Marking 100 years of jazz in the UK, the exhibition explores the impact that jazz had on Britons from 1918. 🎷

Jazz provoked reactions ranging from devotion to abhorrence when the idea, and then the sound, of the music first entered the consciousness of the British public in the aftermath of the First World War. Visiting American groups such as the Original Dixieland Jazz Band and the Southern Syncopated Orchestra offered Britons their first chance to experience the music live.

The exhibition highlights how the new jazz sound in post-War nightclubs and dancehalls provided exciting and dynamic material for British artists. Bold depictions of lively dancers by William Roberts and Frank Dobson, will be displayed alongside the Harlem-inspired paintings for which Edward Burra, one of Britain’s foremost Modernist painters, was well-known.

The growing interest in jazz brought black and white musicians, artists and audiences together, and was crucial in influencing changes in British society, moving from stereotypes descended from the minstrel show to a more nuanced understanding of and interest in African American and black British culture.

The exhibition brings together painting, prints, cartoons, textiles and ceramics, moving film, instruments and the all-important jazz sound, to explicitly examine the influence of jazz on British art, design and wider society.

www.twotempleplace.org/exhibitions/rhythm-and-reaction

Location:
Two Temple Place, London WC2R 3BD

Times:
Monday 10am – 4.30pm
Tuesday closed
Wednesday 10am – 9pm
Thursday 10am – 4.30pm
Friday 10am – 4.30pm
Saturday 10am – 4.30pm
Sunday 11am – 4.30pm

Price:
Free entry