Category: Event (page 1 of 234)

Night Tale’s bank holiday weekender @ NT’s Bar / until 1st May 2017 🍸🍺🎶

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Thu 18:00-midnight
Fri 18:00-midnight
Sat 18:00-03:00
Sun 18:00-03:00

@ NT’s Bar, 1 Westgate Street, London E8 3RL

Free entry all weekend

www.ntbar.co.uk

Four banging days of back to back music to celebrate this April Bank Holiday taking you through from Thursday til’ the early hours of Monday morning.

RSVP on Facebook

Richard Tuttle: The Critical Edge @ Pace Gallery / until 13 May 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tues-Sat 10-6

@ Pace Gallery, 6 Burlington Gardens, London W1S 3ET

Free entry

www.pacegallery.com/exhibitions/12860/the-critical-edge

An exhibition of recent works in fabric by Richard Tuttle. First presented at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, in 2016, the exhibition follows two other major exhibitions of Tuttle’s work. In 2014, The Whitechapel Gallery surveyed the artist’s career from the 1960s to today and Tate Modern commissioned Tuttle’s largest textile sculpture to date for its iconic Turbine Hall.

Richard Tuttle (b. 1941, Rahway, New Jersey) is one of the most significant artists working today. Since the mid-1960s, he has created an extraordinarily varied body of work that eludes historical or stylistic categorization. Tuttle’s work exists in the space between painting, sculpture, poetry, assemblage, and drawing. He draws beauty out of humble materials, reflecting the fragility of the world in his poetic works. Without a specific reference point, his investigations of line, volume, color, texture, shape, and form are imbued with a sense of spirituality and informed by a deep intellectual curiosity. Language, spatial relationship, and scale are also central concerns for the artist, who maintains an acute awareness for the viewer’s aesthetic experience. Tuttle was the Artist in Residence at the Getty Research Institute from September 2012–June 2013. The artist lives and works in Mount Desert, Maine; Abiquiu, New Mexico and New York City.

Ashley Bickerton: Ornamental Hysteria @ Newport Street Gallery / until 20th August 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Tuesday – Sunday 10am – 6pm
Closed on Mondays

@ Newport Street Gallery, Newport Street, London SE11 6AJ

Free entry

www.newportstreetgallery.com/exhibitions/ashley-bickerton

Spanning more than three decades of Bickerton’s career and features 51 works, including a significant display of new and previously unexhibited pieces. It is the artist’s first UK show since 2009 and runs throughout all six spaces at Newport Street Gallery.

Bickerton moved to New York in 1982 and after working as a painting assistant to Jack Goldstein, he emerged as a key figure on the newly exploding East Village art scene. Within the context of the culture of commodification sweeping America he rose to prominence as part of an amorphous movement that was branded ‘Neo-Geometric Conceptualism’. Alongside artists such as Haim Steinbach and Jeff Koons, Bickerton endeavoured to reframe the practice of art production in response to the new, seductive mechanisms of desire at work in society.

Bickerton abandoned New York in 1993, eventually settling in Bali, where he still lives and works. Whilst a number of his themes prevailed, the materiality of his work shifted dramatically after this self-imposed exile from the urban environment.

Both in materiality and content, Bickerton’s work resists categorisation. On the diversity of his mediums – photocollage, appropriated image, digital image, paint and sculpture – he states: “Painting is far too cartoony and lacks the backbone of factuality; photography is too clinical and incapable of loony launches into the ether; and sculpture can be just downright presumptuous. […] Only in their combination do I find comfort.”

Bickerton’s conceptual commitment to intersectionality extends to his subject matter; his audacious and technically complex assemblages are predicated on themes of opposition and duality, for example representation and reality, creativity and commodity, nature and artifice, idyll and apocalypse. This is evident in his earlier work on display in gallery 1, which offers a sardonic critique of contemporary consumer culture and the commodification of the ‘art object’ via steel and aluminium wall-mounted ‘Culturescapes’ from the ‘Logo’ and ‘Non-Word Word’ series. Galleries 3 and 4 are dominated by Bickerton’s ‘Sea’ and ‘Landscapes’ – overblown and incongruous, they contain ephemera from the anthroposphere in the simulated shells of transportation devices. In part, these “truly contemporary” landscapes might be read as a dystopian view of the devastating impact of man on the ecosphere.

Throughout his career, Bickerton has challenged the relevancy of traditional art-historical tropes. His ‘self-portraits’ similarly parody the mythological figure of ‘the artist’, who is represented in the guise of the brands he chooses to endorse in Tormented Self-Portrait: Susie at Arles (25 Years) (2014) and as a five-bodied, technicoloured serpent in the monumental 5 Snake Heads (2009), on display in Newport Street’s double-height gallery 2.

Bickerton’s practice evolved in the late 90s to incorporate digital image and photography. In portraits such as Smiling Woman (2009), models (often family members and friends) are heavily made-up and photographed, then distorted in Photoshop before the image is printed on canvas and re-painted. These paintings are amongst Bickerton’s most overtly satirical, presenting lurid, constructed visions of life on a generic Pacific / Caribbean island.

London Clown Festival @ Hornsey Town Hall Arts Centre / from 11th – 21st May 2017 🤡

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: various

@ Hornsey Town Hall Arts Centre, The Broadway, Crouch End, London E8 9JJ

Tickets: from £7.50 book online

www.londonclownfest.co.uk

The festival returns and will be located in the Art Deco splendour of Hornsey Town Hall to bring a multitude of shows to four venues within the building.

Featuring highly acclaimed artists, alongside up and coming new talent from across the globe. London Clown Festival will maintain its founding principles remaining a celebration of physical comedy and clown influenced contemporary performance, exploring various forms of clowning and sharing the joy, exhilaration and surprise with a wide breadth of audiences both young and old and to help to explore the image of Clown in the public consciousness, igniting a new passion in audiences.

Lightheaded, whimsical, anarchic, dark and political performers all find a home within the festival. The court jester spoke the truth to the King without punishment or penalty and this subversive performance tradition continues.

In its inaugural year in 2016, London Clown Festival, the first of its kind in London, set out to celebrate the rise of modern clowning, bringing amazing physical performers who could make people laugh with a twitch of their eyebrows into one place.

Highlights of the 2017 festival include Red Bastard, Natalie Palamides: Laid (co-devised and directed by Edinburgh Comedy Award Winner Dr Brown) Zach & Viggo: Dream Team (Winners – Best Comedy, Adelaide Fringe Weekly Award and Best Comedy Brighton Fringe) Jamie Wood: I Am A Tree (Total Theatre Award for Innovation Nominee) Twisted Loaf Are Off Yeast (Funny Women Award winners) and many more, including workshops yet to be announced.

Clowning has been growing in popularity and its reputation changing over the last few years, with a number of high profile and award winning performers coming to the forefront of the comedy industry, moving away from stereotypes of red noses and squirty flowers and towards the sophisticated silliness of physical comedy at its greatest.

Last year the festival recognised the upsurge of comedy and theatre performers who have been influenced by the teachings of legendary physical performance trainers Lecoq and Gaulier and many of these students have gone on to become celebrated award winning artists. However, Clown remains somewhat of an enigma to the general public who still sometimes think only of the stereotypical image of the clown as found in circus performance, complete with big shoes and painted faces. Or of course as the figures of fear as seen the spate of scary clown sightings on the UK streets last year.

Selfie to Self-Expression @ Saatchi Gallery / until 30th May 2017 🤳😝📸

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10am-6pm, 7 days a week

@ Saatchi Gallery, Duke of York’s HQ, King’s Road, London SW3 4RY

Free entry

www.saatchigallery.com/selfie

Saatchi Gallery and Huawei have teamed up to present From Selfie to Self-Expression. This will be the world’s first exhibition exploring the history of the selfie from the old masters to the present day, and will celebrate the truly creative potential of a form of expression often derided for its inanity.

The show will also highlight the emerging role of the mobile phone as an artistic medium for self-expression by commissioning ten exciting young British photographers to create new works using Huawei’s newest breakthrough dual lens smartphones co-engineered with Leica.

Game Changers: another way to play @ Somerset House / until 7th May 2017 🃏 ♣️ 👾 🎲 🕹

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Mon, Tue, Sat & Sun 10.00-18.00 (last entry 17.00)
Wed–Fri 11.00-20.00 (last entry 19.00)

@ Somerset House,  Strand, London WC2R 1LA

Free entry!

www.somersethouse.org.uk/whats-on/game-changers

Discover how traditional forms of chess, billiards and mazes continue to influence designers making exciting new games today.

A timeline tracing how traditional forms of chess, billiards and mazes have evolved with a selection of contemporary examples – both physical and digital – will be on show for visitors to try, including:

Four regional variations of Orthogonal/Diagonal, Nova Jiang’s modified chess sets which showed at Now Play This in 2016. Inspired by traditional Bauhaus chess sets, the pieces’ physical shape indicates how they should move.

A playable installation of Zach Gage’s Really Bad Chess, a digital game that recreates chess with a random selection of pieces for each player.

  • Home Turf, by Ed Saperia, a distorted billiards table that combines the normal challenges of billiards with a deliberately difficult shape
  • INKS by State of Play, an on-screen game within a physical pinball-style environment – derived from more traditional forms of billiards and bagatelle
  • Maze, a challenging, two-player table-top maze game by sculptor Alexander Berchert

Alice’s Adventures Underground @ The Vaults / until 23rd September 2017 🐰

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: various

@ The Vaults, Launcelot Street, London SE1 7AD

Tickets: from £31.50 book online (special under 26 year old tickets available for £25!)

www.alice-underground.com

Following the sell-out run in 2015 at the Vaults deep under Waterloo Station, Les Enfants Terribles’ and ebp bring their Olivier award nominated Alice’s Adventures Underground back in April!

Tumble down the rabbit hole and make a series of choices in a theatrical adventure like no other, with more to explore than ever before!

Meet some of Wonderlands famous and curious inhabitants. Take tea at the biggest un-birthday party with the maddest of Hatters; let the Cheshire Cat take you hither or thither or join the underground movement to rise against the fearsome Queen of Hearts.

The Japanese House: Architecture and Life after 1945 @ Barbican Art Gallery / until 25th June 2017 🏡🇯🇵

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Mon–Sat: 9am–11pm
Sun: 11am-11pm
Bank Holidays: 12 noon–11pm

@ Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS

Tickets: £14.50 book online

www.barbican.org.uk

Our homes and personalities are intrinsically linked but nowhere more so than in Japanese architecture, where the needs of a building’s residents inform its very construction. The Japanese House welcomes you inside the Moriyama House (2005), designed in Tokyo by Ryue Nishizawa (SANAA) and inhabited by Yasuo Moriyama, an enigmatic urban hermit.

Lose track of time weaving in and out of the house’s ten individual, fully-furnished rooms and maze-like gardens. Rabbit chairs, sliding libraries and an ‘outdoor’ cinema are just some of the details that make up Moriyama’s unusual domestic environment.

As well as the full-size recreation of the Moriyama House, the exhibition also features a fantastical and lovingly crafted Japanese teahouse and garden designed by Terunobu Fujimori, featuring traditional Japanese tea ceremonies throughout the exhibition run. Come and watch day turn to night in the gallery space as part of this full sensory experience.

The Japanese House is the centrepiece of the UK’s first major exhibition exploring Japanese domestic architecture from the end of the Second World War, a period which has consistently produced some of the most influential and ground-breaking examples of modern and contemporary design.

In the wake of the war, the widespread devastation of Tokyo and other Japanese cities brought an urgent need for new housing, and the single family house became the foremost site for architectural experimentation and debate. Since then, Japanese architects have used their designs to propose radical critiques of society and innovative solutions to changing lifestyles.

Adventures in Moominland @ Southbank Centre / until 20th August 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: various

@ Southbank Centre, Belvedere Road, London SE1 8XX

Tickets: from £13.75 book online

www.southbankcentre.co.uk

Climb into and get lost inside the eccentric world of Moominland as we explore the internationally renowned Moomin stories through the life of its author, Tove Jansson.

Created in Finland, the Moomin stories are set in the fictional land of Moominvalley and centre around several oddly-shaped characters, including Moominpappa, Moominmamma, little Moomintroll and their friends.

Join us on an enthralling journey through our wondrous Moominland – clamber through forests, huddle in caves or set sail on the high seas to try and find the Moomin family. Along the way you can learn how Tove Jansson created these unique landscapes, characters and stories, while uncovering some special original drawings.

Fevered Sleep: Men & Girls Dance @ The Place / from Thursday 13th – Saturday 22nd April 2017 👯 👯‍♂️

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 7.30pm (Sat 22 Apr 2.30pm)

@ The Place, 17 Duke’s Road, London WC1H 9PY

Tickets: from £12 book online

www.theplace.org.uk/whats-on/fevered-sleep
www.menandgirlsdance.com

Brings together two very different groups of performers: men who dance professionally and girls who dance for fun.

At times playful, at times provocative, Men & Girls Dance celebrates the rights of adults and children to be together and to dance together. It’s a joyful celebration of tenderness, empathy and love.

Co-commissioned by The Place, this critically acclaimed production arrives for a limited London run after a hugely successful national tour.

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