Gods Own Junkyard @ pop-up at Selfridges, Lights of Soho and Gods Own Junkyard / open year round

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Various see below

@
Various see below

Free entry

www.godsownjunkyard.co.uk

Chris Bracey was the Neon Man for 37 years creating iconic pieces for artists including David LaChappelle and Martin Creed. He died November 2014.

The new and used neon fantasies are created from salvaged signs, vintage neons, old movie props and retro displays, retrieved and renewed waste and lights also fairground and circus lighting.

Visit at:
Pop-up at Selfridges
Lower Ground Floor, 400 Oxford Street, London W1A 1AB
Mon-Wed 9:30-20:00
Thu 9:30-21:00
Fri-Sat 9:30-20:00
Sun 11:30-18:00

Lights of Soho
35 Brewer Street, London W1F 0RX
Mon-Sun 10:00-20:00

Gods Own Junkyard (including Rolling Scones Cafe)
Unit 12, Ravenswood Industrial Estate, Shernhall Street, London E17 9HQ
Mon-Thu closed
Fri 11:00-17:00
Sat 11:00-21:00
Sun 11:00-18:00

DJ Yoda @ The Old Queen’s Head / Friday 9th January 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 8pm to 2am

@ The Old Queens Head, 44 Essex Road, London N1 8LN

Tickets: £5 (limited entry on the door, arrive from 7pm)

www.theoldqueenshead.com

Quite simply the best party DJ there is! Multi award winning DJ Yoda is a scratch master, visual and audio genius. This a unique chance to see him in an intimate setting.

Catch @djyodauk this Friday! Advanced tickets are sold out, ltd entry on the door from 7pm

A photo posted by The Old Queen's Head (@oldqueenshead) on

Breakfast/lunch/dinner @ Cereal Killer Cafe / open every day

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 7am-10pm

@ Cereal Killer Cafe, 139 Brick Lane, London E1 6SB

Free entry

www.cerealkillercafe.co.uk

The UK’s first speciality Cereal Cafe with over 120 different types of cereal from around the world.

To create the perfect bowl of cereal you can choose from 30 different varieties of milk and 20 different toppings.

To give you the real sugar rush feeling you had when you were a kid come and visit for breakfast, lunch or dinner in the nostalgic cafe displaying hundreds of pieces of memorabilia from the 80s and 90s.

Giacomo Bufarini aka RUN: Parabola Di G @ Howard Griffin Gallery / until 31st January 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Tue-Sun 12PM-8PM

@ Howard Griffin Gallery, 189 Shoreditch High Street, London E1 6HU

Free entry

www.howardgriffingallery.com

For the first time, RUN is exhibiting under his real name, Giacomo Bufarini.

In this unique exhibition, he leads us through a semi-autobiographical story told through a unique series of highly detailed pen and ink drawings that collectively make up a book. On this voyage of self-discovery, Bufarini is both the creator and protagonist, trapped within his own story. Bufarini plays with levels of reality and metaphor, creating a dreamscape that appears at once fantastical and very real.

Parabola di G follows the journey of a semi-fictional character, G, as he falls through levels of reality into a dreamscape. The exhibition presents a unique opportunity to see the original drawings of the book presented within an immersive gallery wide installation.

Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010 @ Tate Modern / until 8th February 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Sun–Thu 10:00–18:00
Fri–Sat 10:00–22:00

@ Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: £14.50 book online

www.tate.org.uk

Sigmar Polke was one of the most insatiably experimental artists of the twentieth century.

The retrospective is the first to bring together the unusually broad range of media he worked with during his five-decade career – not only painting, drawing, photography, film and sculpture, but also notebooks, slide projections and photocopies.

He worked in off-the-wall materials ranging from meteor dust to gold, bubble wrap, snail juice, potatoes, soot and even uranium, all the while resisting easy categorisation.

Polke’s relentlessly inventive works range in size from the intimacy of a notebook to monumental paintings. He took a wildly different approach to art-making, from his responses to consumer society in the 1960s to his interest in travel, drugs and communal living in the 1970s and his increasingly experimental practice after 1980.

Beneath Polke’s irreverent wit, promiscuous intelligence, and chance operations lay a deep scepticism of all authority. It would be impossible to understand this attitude, and the creativity that grew out of it, without considering Polke’s biography and its setting.

In 1945, near the end of World War II, his family fled Silesia (in present-day Poland) for what would soon be Soviet-occupied East Germany, and then escaped again, this time to West Germany, in 1953.
Polke grew up at a time when many Germans deflected blame for the atrocities of the Nazi period with the alibi, ‘I didn’t see anything’.

In various works in the exhibition, Polke opposes many Germans of his generation’s tendency to ignore the Nazi past, as if picking off the scab to reopen the wound.

Binkbeats @ Royal Albert Hall / Monday 26th January 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 20:00

@ Royal Albert Hall, Elgar Room, Kensington Gore, London SW7 2AP

Tickets: book online

www.royalalberthall.com

Operating from what looks like a storage room filled with weird and out of time instruments, Binkbeats has become an unparalleled musical wizard, meticulously deconstructing electronic tracks and rebuilding them in a single live take.

Reinterpretating the music of Madlib, Flying Lotus, Aphex Twin and J. Dilla with instruments ranging from vibraphone, guzheng (Chinese harp), turntables, exotic percussion, voice and typewriter, he quickly received the reception he deserved, with his Beats Unraveled video sessions hitting more than a million views.

Bloomberg New Contemporaries 2014 @ ICA / until 25th January 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Tue-Sun 11am–11pm (venue)

11am–6pm except Thu 11am–9pm (exhibitions)

@ Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA), Lower and Upper Galleries, The Mall, London SW1Y 5AH

Free entry (£1 day membership)

www.ica.org.uk
www.newcontemporaries.org.uk

Works by 55 of the most promising artists emerging from UK art schools from 1,400 submissions.

This year printmaking, moving image and performance occupy much of the final selection as well as an interest in modes of production and materiality.

Artists explore themes linked to:

Current affairs (Marco Godoy, Melissa Kime, Milou van der Maaden)

Human behaviour (Simon Senn, Lucy Beech, Stacey Guthrie)

Language (Matt Copson, Alice Hartley, Imran Perretta)

Desire (Yi Dai, Katie Hayward, Racheal Crowther, Tajinder Dhami)

The body (Bee Flowers, Yussef Hu, MKLK, Adam Wallace, Xiao-Yang Li)

Constructing Worlds: Photography and Architecture in the Modern Age @ Barbican Centre / until 11th January 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Sat-Wed 10am–6pm
Thu-Fri 10am–9pm

@ Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS

Tickets: around £12 book online

www.barbican.org.uk

Constructing Worlds brings together eighteen exceptional photographers from the 1930s to the present day who have changed the way we view architecture and perceive the world around us.

From the first skyscrapers in New York and decaying colonial structures in the Congo, to the glamorous suburban homes of post-war California, and the modern towers of Venezuela, we invite you on a global journey through 20th and 21st century architecture.

Featuring over 250 works, this exhibition highlights the power of photography in revealing hidden truths in our society.

London New Year’s Day Parade 2015 @ central London / Thursday 1st January 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

From: noon-15:30

@ Starts Piccadilly, ends Parliament Square

Free

www.lnydp.com

London’s New Year’s Day Parade has evolved into one of the world’s great street spectaculars with up to 10,000 performers from across continents, hundreds of thousands of spectators, and a ‘live’ TV audience of several hundred million.

The Parade starts at 12 midday on Piccadilly at the junction with Berkeley Street near Green Park Tube Station and finishes at 3.30 pm in Parliament Square.

The Parade route is – Piccadilly, Piccadilly Circus, Lower Regent Street, Waterloo Place, Pall Mall, Cockspur Street, Trafalgar Square, Whitehall and Parliament Street.

See the route on Google Maps.