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Latitude Festival @ Henham Park / from 14th July – 17th July 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: all day until late

Tickets: £205 weekend camping, book online

www.latitudefestival.com

Latitude Festival announces the line up for their 11th Edition. The Maccabees return to Latitude to perform their first ever major festival headline show on Friday night in the Obelisk Arena. The south London five piece climb to the top of the bill to cap a remarkable twelve months that has seen them score their first number one album with the acclaimed ‘Marks To Prove It’ last July, and crowned as Best British Band at last month’s NME Awards.

Saturday welcomes one of Latitude’s most loved bands, The National, back to Henham Park as the first ever act to headline the festival for a second time. Their return to the Obelisk stage will be a UK festival exclusive this year; promising a stellar set drawn from their unparalleled six albums.

British all-time greats, New Order took the world by surprise with the release of ‘Music Complete’ last year; 10 years on from their previous studio offering. With 35 years of genre and era-defining classics to draw upon, New Order are set to provide a spectacular closing performance for Latitude 2016.

Performing: The Maccabees, The National, New Order, Beirut, CHVRCHES, M83, Father John Misty, John Grant, The Lumineers, Courtney Barnett, Daughter, Chet Faker, British Sea Power, Squeeze, Laura Mvula, Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats, Michael Kiwanuka, Sturgill Simpson, Alif, Grimes, Of Monsters and Men, Miike Snow, Frightened Rabbit, Half Moon Run, MO, Christine and the Queens, Polica, Lapsley, Roots Manuva, Perfume Genius, Oh Wonder, Jamie Woon, Rat Boy, AURORA, Mura Masa, Lucius, Pantha du Prince, Black Mountain, Anna Meredith, Blanck Mass, Bob Moses, Cloves, Drones Club, Hayden James, Highasakite, Holly Macve, Kelly Lee Owens, Lambert, Little Green Cars, Marlon Williams, Money, ProtoMartyr, Suuns, Weaves, Jungle, David Rodigan, Mike Skinner, Murkage and Tonga.

Imran Qureshi: Where the Shadows are so Deep @ Barbican: The Curve / until 10th July 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Sat–Wed 11am–8pm (bank holiday 12–8pm)
Thu–Fri 11am–9pm (bank holiday 12–9pm)

@ Barbican, The Curve, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS

Free entry

www.barbican.org.uk

Barbican has commissioned the award-winning Pakistani artist Imran Qureshi to create a new body of work for The Curve.

For his first major London commission, Qureshi presents Where the Shadows are so Deep, a series of exquisite miniature paintings, drawing upon The Curve as a motif in this tradition. Beginning with gentle scenes of nature, the sequence of works gradually introduces darker elements, subtly implying the uncertainty of what lies around the bend. Hung at varying heights along the dramatic 90-metre span of the space, these delicate, jewel-like paintings lure the visitor in, demanding an altogether different kind of looking.

J. G. Ballard Afternoon @ Rio Cinema / Sunday 13th March 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: various

@ Rio Cinema, 107 Kingsland High Street, London E8 2PB

Tickets: £11 (£9 concessions)

www.riocinema.org.uk

Celebrate J.G. Ballard’s cinematic classics with an afternoon of cinema. Discounts available for multiple films!

Part 1:

Thirteen to Centaurus at 12:00
Donald Houston, James Hunter, John Abineri, Noel Johnson, Robert James.
A television adaptation of one of the Ballard short stories in which he takes a psychological problem and explores the minds of the subjects who are part of the testing process. Among the crew of a space station hurtling through space towards Alpha Centauri is 16-year-old wunderkind, Abel, a boy given to questioning every facet of his existence. Abel is aware that there is something beyond the limits of his perception, some vital key of knowledge that will explode the received worldview controlling life on the station but like the rest of the crew he is subjected to ‘subsonic’ instruction – brainwashing – which keeps their minds preoccupied solely with day to day existence… But there’s a twist in the tale of this disquieting and prescient piece of science-fiction.

Empire of the Sun at 13.15
Christian Bale, John Malkovich, Miranda Richardson.
A rare occurrence indeed, but J. G. Ballard welcomed Steven Spielberg’s visualisation of the author’s autobiographical novel which was based on his life as a boy in Shanghai during the Second World War, his internment by the Japanese and the search for his parents. He once described the director as ‘an intelligent and thoughtful man’ and the film as one that ‘seems more truthful as the years pass, while ‘brilliant child actor Chrisian Bale uncannily resembled my younger self’ Ballard wrote in 2006. Indeed EMPIRE OF THE SUN, with a screenplay by Tom Stoppard is no simple hijacking of childhood memories, but a deeply moving and compelling tale of hope and survival against all the odds.

Part 2:

Fleshed Out at 16.00
An intense combination of sound and images from Gazelle Twin – composer, producer and performance artist Elizabeth Bernholz – whose live performance personas and electronic musical work have continued to gather critical acclaim since her 2014 album Unflesh. She has also declared a lifelong fascination with the work of J.G. Ballard. In FLESHED OUT, a collaboration with film-maker Esther Springett, even the most familiar of views trigger a threatening unease.

B-Movie (Ballardian Video Neuronica) at 16.15
One of electro-pop’s original pioneers, provides most of the soundtrack for this cut-up movie by Foxx and artist/designer John Karborn featuring typography design & animation by Jon Barnbrook. Inspired by the themes, influence and text of writer J. G. Ballard, it is described as ‘a film and sound seance manifesting J. G. Ballard neurones. Mobilised by ultracolour and inframusic, anatomised hallucinogenetics and proximity psychopathagens.’ Look out for bits of VERTIGO and THE THIRD MAN.

Crash at 16.45
This controversial adaptation of a 1973 novel is the perfect synthesis of the clinical imagination and warped visions of director David Cronenberg and writer J. G. Ballard. After he is involved in a car crash, a movie producer becomes strangely sexually aroused by crashes and fellow victims and discovers an entire sub-culture built around his obsession. Seen as lurid and gratuitous rather than moving and involving by reviewers and the local authorities which banned it at the time of its first release, CRASH remains a daring, challenging and courageous depiction of a psycho-sexual journey into oblivion. Ballard wrote his book to illustrate the connections between sex and technology- the ultimate postmodern melding of flesh and machine – and in Cronenberg he certainly found the one director who could take his theme to the final frontier of sexual expression.

SkyLounge: Prosecco and fancy popcorn @ DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel (Tower Hill) / until the end of March 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 11:00am – 2:00am

@ DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel London, Tower of London, 7 Pepys Street, London EC3N 4AF

Free entry, book a table

http://doubletree3.hilton.com

Unwind with a superb view of the city skyline. The hotel’s premium destination bar, SkyLounge, is located in the heart of London and serves innovative dishes and signature cocktails.

Guests and locals enjoy 360-degree views and fresh air from two terraces. Landmarks visible from SkyLounge include the Tower Bridge, The Shard, the Tower of London, River Thames, Gherkin and St. Paul’s Cathedral. A resident DJ sets the mood.

In celebration of International Women’s Day, Skylounge is offering women a complimentary glass of Prosecco decorated with dainty, edible flowers and a box of strawberry cheesecake pop-corn throughout the whole of March, every evening from 5-8pm.

Secret Cinema Presents: 28 Days Later @ secret location / from 14th April 2016 until 29th May 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 6pm and noon matinees

@ Secret location

Tickets: from £55 book online

www.secretcinema.org/tickets/28dayslater

Secret Cinema is taking over London in the original setting of Danny Boyle’s zombie horror epic 28 Days Later.

As ever, the venue and location is secret. You can expect an incredible immersive theatrical experience where you are as much of the setting as the actors and fake blood!

Scrap your post-work run, make a trip to Homebase for a collection of spades and run around London terrified without other bloody fans.

Absolutely unmissable, tickets are selling very fast so book now.

Botticelli Reimagined @ V&A / until 3rd July 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10.00-17.45

@ Victoria and Albert Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 2RL

Tickets: £15 book online

www.vam.ac.uk/content/exhibitions/exhibition-botticelli-reimagined

This innovative exhibition will explore the enduring impact of the Florentine painter Sandro Botticelli (1445-1510) from the Pre-Raphaelites to today. The exhibition is organised by the V&A and the Gemäldegalerie – Staatliche Museen zu Berlin.

Sandro Botticelli (1445-1510) is recognised as one of the greatest artists of all time. His celebrated images are firmly embedded in public consciousness and his influence permeates art, design, fashion and film. However, although lauded in his lifetime, Botticelli was largely forgotten for more than 300 years until his work was progressively rediscovered in the 19th century.

Telling a story 500 years in the making, Botticelli Reimagined will be the largest Botticelli exhibition in Britain since 1930. Including painting, fashion, film, drawing, photography, tapestry, sculpture and print, the exhibition will explore the ways that artists and designers have reinterpreted Botticelli. It will include over 50 original works by Botticelli, alongside works by artists such as Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Edward Burne-Jones, William Morris, René Magritte, Elsa Schiaparelli, Andy Warhol and Cindy Sherman.

Hand Maid @ Hoxton Arches / until Wednesday 9th March 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
12pm – 7pm

@ Hoxton Arches, Cremer Street, London E2 8HD

Free entry

www.wearesweetart.com

Hand Maid will be Sweet ‘Art’s third exhibition in aid of International Women’s Day and will be following a Sweet ‘Art tradition of hosting fun, challenging, interactive and inclusive exhibitions to mark IWD.

Showcasing the work of local and international artists exploring the themes of femininity, feminine identity and women’s day. Works will celebrate, critique and reflect notions of femininity in our society and internationally, created by artists identifying as any gender.

Along with exhibiting a selection of artworks, from the beautiful to the provocative, Hand Maid will also be an inclusive and fun art experience for visitors attending the show and the opening reception, that is set to be another awesome arty party following Sweet ‘Art tradition, including interactive artworks, workshops and fun and exciting freebies and surprises.

In addition there will also be a program of feminist films during the course of the show. Join for a vagina cupcake and a Sweet ‘Art punch in celebration and solidarity!

Mark Wallinger ID @ Hauser & Wirth / until 7th May 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10am–6pm (Tuesday–Saturday)

@ Hauser & Wirth, 23 Savile Row, London W1S 2ET

Free entry

www.hauserwirth.com

Debut solo exhibition featuring new paintings and multi-media works. In this exhibition, Wallinger encourages a contemplation of the self within a society in which behaviour and personal identity come under increasingly closer scrutiny.

Wallinger utilises Sigmund Freud’s terms, id, ego and superego in an interrogation of the psyche, the self, and the subject. The work examines how, as human beings, we operate between our instinctual urges, our attachment to our identities, and the ways in which we judge ourselves as members of a certain culture.

Entering into the North Gallery, the first work is ‘Ego’ (2016). Two iPhone photographs depict the hands of their creator: the artist Mark Wallinger. The work, doubly hubristic, is a playful recreation of Michelangelo’s ‘Creation of Adam’.

The remainder of the gallery is devoted to a new body of work: the id Paintings. According to Freud, the id, driven by the pleasure principle, is the source of all psychic energy. The paintings are the record of actions that appear to be intuitive and guided by instinct, thus echoing the primal, impulsive and libidinal characteristics of the id. These monumental paintings have grown out of Wallinger’s extensive self-portrait series and they reference the artist’s own body. His height – and therefore his arm span – is the basis of the canvas size. They are exactly this measurement in width and double in height. Wallinger uses symmetrical bodily gestures on the two halves of the canvas to mirror one another. This recalls the bilateral symmetry of Leonardo da Vinci’s ‘Vitruvian Man’ and more explicitly the Rorschach test. Created by sweeping paint-laden hands across the canvas in active freeform gestures, the id Paintings bear the evidence of their making and of the artist’s encounter with the surface. In recognising figures and shapes in the material, the viewer reveals their own desires and predilections while trying to interpret those of the artist.

In the South Gallery, the visitor is confronted initially by a new sculptural work, ‘Superego’ (2016). In contrast to the id the superego acts to perfect, civilise, control, and suppress our behaviour. ‘Superego’ is an entirely mirrored form inspired by the revolving New Scotland Yard sign. This sign itself is a brand, a logo, and seat of authority. It is the all-seeing eye omnipresent and omniscient. Its constant rotation symbolises the ceaseless energy and vigilance of the police. Through the abstraction of this symbolic totem, Wallinger produces an enigmatic symbol of dominance. The sculpture’s reflective surface offers the promise of our own self-reflection and recognition. Here however, the mirrors revolve implacably above the viewer’s head. Their purview is remote and inaccessible.

‘Ever Since’ (2012) is a life-sized projection of a barber’s shop front. The only thing that appears to be moving is the barber’s pole outside. Closer inspection reveals the truncated progress of the second hand of the clock inside. Two seconds loop endlessly. The way that we perceive movement in film is different to the way we perceive moving objects in real life, since film images do not really move at all. Displaying a series of consecutively photographed still images, in quick succession, creates apparent motion. The barber’s ever rising red and white spiral is an illusion, yet here it can be seen as an illusion of ‘endlessness’. One revolution of the pole lasts two seconds. It is a silent film of time passed that is forever passing.

For ‘Shadow Walker’ (2011) Wallinger captures his shadow walking along Shaftesbury Avenue. The shadow moves fluidly over passing strangers and slides up and down the kerbstones. It navigates the chewed gum, spilt alcohol and worse. Before long it assumes an autonomous existence as ‘real’ as the artist’s actual body. His creation becomes a modern-day version of Peter Pan’s lost shadow.

Wallinger’s new video work, ‘Orrery’ (2016) takes as its subject the New Fairlop Oak in the centre of Fullwell Cross roundabout in Barkingside. This tree was planted in 1951 as part of the Festival of Britain to commemorate the legendary Fairlop Oak that had stood for centuries in Hainault Forest. ‘Orrery’ takes its name from the mechanical model that articulates the positions of the planets and moons. Within the gallery, the work is presented on four screens mounted on stands representing the four seasons, reiterating the pedagogical nature of the Orrery.

The work was created using an iPhone blue-tacked to the driver’s side window. In this way the tree is presented in a revolving dance within the constancy of the frame. The oak tree on its island is a cameo of Britain destined to rotate in its tiny orbit endlessly. As the world around the tree revolves, the sun moves across the screen. This revolution of a municipal roundabout in Essex becomes a contemplation of the orbit of our planet around the sun and our place in the universe.

Moët & Chandon @ Code Nast College of Fashion / from 21st March until 3rd April 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: various

@ Condé Nast College of Fashion & Design, 16-17 Greek Street, London W1D 4DR

Tickets: £45 book online

www.moethennessy-selection.co.uk

Following the success of its inaugural educational and immersive pop-up in London last year, Moët & Chandon is once again returning with the Moët Academy showcasing new and inspiring experiences.

Taking place at the Condé Nast College, Soho, you will be transported through the vineyards and cellars of Moët & Chandon in an exciting immersive 360° virtual reality experience. Discover the Champagne region, the history of Moët & Chandon and the science of blending and maturation to create the world’s most loved champagne.

During the 90 minute experience, you will be guided through a virtual and immersive experience from grape to glass. Hosted by wine gurus Susie Barrie, Peter Richards, Jane Parkinson and Simon Stockton, you will learn more about the Champagne region, its vineyards and grape varieties.

You will discover how champagne is made and differs in style from sparkling wines. Following this, you will be invited to taste the full Moët & Chandon range to showcase winemaking styles, of which, a unique preview of the Grand Vintage Rosé 2008 that will be released later in the year.

Performing for the Camera @ Tate Modern / until 12th June 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Sun–Thu 10am–6pm
Fri–Sat 10am–10pm

@ Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: £14.50 book online

Serious performance art, portraiture, or just simply posing for the camera? What does it mean to perform for the camera?
Photography has been used to capture performances since its invention – from the stars of the Victorian stage to the art happenings of the 1960s, and today’s trend for selfies.

With over 50 seminal photographers on display, the exhibition explores the relationship between photography and performance, engaging with serious, provocative and sensational topics, as well as humour, improvisation and irony. It shows how photographs have captured performances by important artists including Yves Klein and Yayoi Kusama, and ground-breaking collaborations between photographers, performers and dancers. It looks at how artists including Francesca Woodman, Erwin Wurm and others have used photography as a stage on which to perform, and how figures from Cindy Sherman and Hannah Wilke to Marcel Duchamp and Samuel Fosso have used photography to explore identity.

From marketing and self-promotion, to the investigation of gender and identity, to experiments with the self-portrait, Performing for the Camera brings together over 500 images shown in series, including vintage prints, large scale works, marketing posters and artists working with Instagram. It is a wide-ranging exploration of how performance artists use photography and how photography is in itself a performance.

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