Tag: art (page 1 of 18)

World Press Photo @ Southbank Centre / until 21st November 2016 🌍 📸

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10am – 11pm

@ Southbank Centre, Belvedere Road, London SE1 8XX

Free entry

www.southbankcentre.co.uk/whatson

See the best in journalistic photography in this renowned exhibition.

Since 1955, World Press Photo has invited press photographers of the world to participate in the premier annual international competition in press photography.

The World Press Photo of the Year competition honours the photographer whose visual creativity and skills made a picture that captures or represents an event or issue of great journalistic importance in the last year.

This year, 5,775 photographers from 128 countries submitted 82,951 images and the jury gave prizes in eight categories to 41 photographers from 21 countries.

Be moved and inspired by the images from these talented photographers, in this exhibition of the finalists’ work.

Intrigue: James Ensor by Luc Tuymans @ Royal Academy of Arts / until 29th January 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Sat-Thu 10am-6pm
Fri 10am-10pm

@ Royal Academy of Arts, The Sackler Wing, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BD

Tickets: £10.50 book online

www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/james-ensor-luc-tuymans

Despite spending his whole professional life in the Belgian seaside town of Ostend, James Ensor was very successful in his lifetime and exerted considerable influence on the development of Expressionism. An innovator and an outsider, he rebelled against the conservative art teachings of the late 19th century academy in Brussels, drawn instead to the avant-garde salons where his radical creative vision could thrive.

Ensor’s childhood spent among the fantastical treasures of his family’s curiosity shop offers a clue as to how the seeds of this wild imagination were sown. The imagery of masks and carnivals runs through much of his work, from vibrant colours and flamboyant costumes to an ever-present sense of drama and satire.

We invited the artist Luc Tuymans, a fellow Belgian and admirer of Ensor, to curate this unique exhibition. Taking a personal view, Tuymans looks back at Ensor’s singular career through a selection of his most bizarrely brilliant and gloriously surreal creations.

Deptford X Fringe @ various locations in Deptford / until Sunday 2nd October 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: various

@ Various locations

Free entry

www.deptfordxfringe.org

A showcase of work from locally-based talent through an open call that invites artists to go and install work in Deptford.

In the past they’ve had art occupying shop windows, libraries, roundabouts, public walls, railway arches and pubs! No nook or cranny is left unfilled. This year they have over 80 different exhibitions and events across 40 venues creating a genuine celebration of local culture!

Events are located throughout Deptford, view the Interactive Google Maps and look at the events listings.

Artists:
Alana Francis
Alfie Dwyer, Dani Smith, Katie South & Will Butterworth
Alison Day
ALW at APT
Andy Nizinskyj
Anna Sebastian
Anne Verheij
Annie Om
APT LIVE
BEARSPACE
Brookmill Studios
Christy Symington MRBS
Clare Daly
Crossfield Studios
Dangerous Minds
Deptford Cinema
DEPTFORD DOES ART: TRIANGLE
Drawing Connections
Edwin Hind
Ellen Watson Curates
Erinyes
Eva Fàbregas and Rachel Pimm
Flâneurism (Rik Moran)
Gopan Iyadurai
Gorka Mohamed
Gossamer Fog
Helena de Pulford
Ian Bruce
Ian Gonczarow
Jake Chapman
James Furzer / Made In Greenwich
Janette Scott
Joshua Drewe & Devora Tancheva
Juliana Capes
Lara Proctor & Shaun Harrigan
Lawrence Preece
Levantes Dance Theatre
Lewisham Arthouse
London Drawing Group
Lucie Kordacova, Karolina Mikeskova
Madi Acharya-Baskerville
Margaret Jennings
Martha Orbach
Matthew Gould
Mr. Degri
news of the world
Nicholas Burwell and Tom Ravenscroft
Nicola Rae
Nomad Art School
Patricio Forrester
Paul Abbott and Alex Roberts
Paul Clayton
PJ Yeboah
Propeller Foundry Open Studio
Redstart Arts
Res.
Rose Cleary
Sally Wyatt
SALSAROSA
Soft Wax
Sound is sound is sound
South London Art Map
Stan’s L I F T
Steven Morgana & Matthew Verdon
The Interview Room
The Jericho Orchestra
Victoria Rance
Vinyl
Zbigniew Libera

We are all Human @ Southbank Centre / until 13th November 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10am-11pm

@ Southbank Centre, Spirit Level, London SE1 8XX

Free entry

www.koestlertrust.org.uk/exhibitions/we-are-all-human

We are all Human is the UK’s annual national showcase of arts by prisoners, ex-offenders on community sentences, secure psychiatric patients and immigration detainees. It is the ninth exhibition in an ongoing partnership between the Koestler Trust and Southbank Centre.

This year’s show was curated by writer and dub–poet Benjamin Zephaniah. The exhibition features a wide range of artforms including painting, drawing, matchstick modelling, craft, music and writing, exploring themes of time, contemplation and the natural environment.

Working alongside Southbank Centre exhibition hosts, to welcome visitors and invigilate the exhibition, are ex-prisoners, specially recruited, trained and employed by the Koestler Trust. As well as gaining unique work experience and new skills, the hosts deepen visitors’ engagement with the exhibition, enabling audiences to hear first-hand how the arts reflect and enrich the lives of people in secure and criminal justice settings.

The Great British Graphic Novel @ Cartoon Museum / 24th July 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Mon-Sat 10:30–17:30 (including Bank Holidays)
Sun 12:00–17:30

@ Cartoon Museum, 35 Little Russell Street, London WC1A 2HH

Tickets: £7

www.cartoonmuseum.org

An exhibition looking at the rise of the British Graphic novel with works by William Hogarth, Kate Charlesworth, Dave Gibbons, Martin Rowson, Posy Simmonds, Bryan and Mary Talbot and many others.

The Cartoon Museum is the only museum in the UK to celebrate our cartoon and comic heritage, from the 18th century to the present day. Four special exhibitions a year explore the work of cartoonists, graphic novelists and animators and themes found in cartoon artwork.

The two permanent displays tell the story of cartooning in all its forms, from the political satire of William Hogarth, Gerald Scarfe, Ralph Steadman and Steve Bell, to the social satire of H.M. Bateman and Pont, to the extraordinary works of William Heath Robinson and the fantastical comic strip creations like Dennis the Menace, Desperate Dan, Rupert Bear and Andy Capp.

Jeff Koons @ Newport Street Gallery / until 18th October 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Tuesday – Friday and Sunday 10am – 6pm
Saturday 10am – 10pm

@ Newport Street Gallery, Newport Street, London SE11 6AJ

Free entry

www.newportstreetgallery.com/exhibitions/current

www.jeffkoons.com

Jeff Koons is widely considered to be one of the most significant artists to have emerged in the postwar era. Since the late 1970s, his diverse work has explored themes pertaining to taste, consumerism, mass culture, beauty, acceptance, and the role of the artist.

‘Now’ is the first major UK exhibition to be devoted to the artist since ‘Jeff Koons: Popeye Series’, at the Serpentine Gallery in 2009. Spanning thirty-five years of the artist’s extraordinary career, ‘Now’ features over thirty paintings, works on paper and sculptures dating from 1979 to 2014. Drawn from Hirst’s collection, a number of these works have never before been shown in the UK.

Tracing the development of the artist’s radical reconfiguration of the readymade, the exhibition features one of Koons’s earliest works, Inflatable Flowers (Short White, Tall Purple) (1979), a vinyl blow-up flower displayed on a mirrored floor tile.

Signalling the conception of one of Koons’s most enduring themes – the inflatable – it is here presented alongside a number of his iconic Hoover sculptures. Part of The New series (1980–1983), the wall-mounted Hoovers – in which immaculate, unused household appliances are displayed in fluorescent-lit, acrylic boxes – date from Koons’s time working as a Wall Street commodities broker. Two of the Hoovers, which remain eternally pristine despite being outdated, were included in Koons’s first solo exhibition, at New York’s New Museum in 1980. Part of that installation – originally displayed in the museum’s storefront windows – has been reassembled for this exhibition. For the artist, the readymade, whether in the form of a child’s toy, Baroque sculpture or advertising billboard, provides “the most objective statement possible”.

Having begun his career focusing on the status of the object, ‘Now’ demonstrates how Koons quickly embarked on his lifelong investigation into the means by which objects are represented and communicated. With his sculptures cast in stainless steel, he returned to the inflatable; seductively replicating pre-existing objects in the gleaming, simulated opulence of the proletarian material. Employing cutting-edge technology, seemingly fragile, air-filled vinyl blow-ups and balloon animals are reproduced in stainless steel, sometimes rendered on the monumental scale of Balloon Monkey (Blue) (2006–2013), here exhibited in Newport Street’s double-height gallery. The reflective surfaces of these sculptures serve to “constantly remind viewers of their existence”, as Koons maintains, “it’s all about you”.

Koons’s enduring ability to delight, fascinate and provoke is evident throughout this broad survey. Employing easily-identified images, he explores social mobility in the Equilibrium Nike posters, the ways alcohol is advertised to different demographics in Luxury and Degradation, and the evocative imagery of childhood toys represented in Celebration. Whilst with his Made in Heaven series – erotic scenes involving the artist and his then-wife Ilona Staller (aka ‘La Cicciolina’) – he investigates the stigma and shame that inheres in contemporary conceptions of sexuality, succeeding in transforming the erotic into a study of: “the biological eternal… the preservation of life, the continuation of life”.

Summarised by curator and critic Norman Rosenthal as “manifestations of a joyful acceptance of American culture”, Koons’s work – which here fills Newport Street’s six, expansive galleries – challenges and teases in equal measure, reflecting as much on the profundities of our existence as the banalities of daily life.

The exhibition contains sexually explicit material.

David Shrigley: Drawings and Paintings @ Stephen Friedman Gallery / until 20th April 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
10am – 6pm (Tuesday to Friday)
11am – 5pm Saturday

@ Stephen Friedman Gallery, 25-28 Old Burlington Street, London W1S 3AN

Free entry

www.stephenfriedman.com/artists/david-shrigley

Eighth solo show by acclaimed British artist David Shrigley. Using acrylic paint and oil stick, he returns to his ubiquitous satirical combination of drawing and text with new large-scale works on paper. Working with oil stick for the first time, here Shrigley riffs on Op Art, with insertions of dry humour that cut to the point of human nature and everyday situations.

This exhibition runs concurrent with a major touring solo show organised by the British Council, enititled ‘Lose Your Mind’, which travels to Museo De Arte Contemporaneo, Santiago, Chile in May 2016. It also prefigures Shrigley’s ‘Really Good’ which will be unveiled in Trafalgar Square, for the Fourth Plinth Commission in September 2016.

For this show the artist turns his sharp art historical critique to optical art. This 1960s development in painting bewitches the eye, creating realistic movement or dimension where there is none. Through Shrigley’s lens and wiggly script the effect is totally undermined, ridiculing the smoothness of design particularly when paired with the mundane everyday subjects that Shrigley often engages with.

Using oil stick, Shrigley’s characteristic line is rendered as though he were drawing with a pencil, but is characterised here by the textured opacity of the material. The brightly-coloured paint, thicker and less controllable than pencil, brings Shrigley’s characteristic imaginings into a new dimension. These works undermine the distinction between painting and drawing, having the lightness of touch and deceptive simplicity of his drawing.

Shrigley’s practice is rich and varied, always underlined with an appreciation of the absurd, the overlooked and the necessity of humour. His subtle, darkly amusing work provides an antidote to everyday life. His skeptical project continues to delight, making us wonder where the never-ending stream of propositions, dilemmas and situations come from to fuel his imagination. Acerbic, weirdly profound and at the same time universal; his work does not require explanation. We are left to our own interpretations; it is whatever we take it to be. Displayed together in this way, the drawings in this exhibition form a fragmented dialogue. The viewer is bombarded with messages, in a way that it is pleasantly exciting. Rather than being confusing, the works create a warm buzz of humorous ambiguity.

The fundamental elements of Shrigley’s practice; the combination of pointedly witty text with immediately recognisable imagery, are maximised here. Having consistently experimented with work across different media, drawing remains the mainstay of Shrigley’s oeuvre. The use of coloured oil stick on primed paper is new to Shrigley’s practice, but relies on the same premise as the black and white drawings for which he is known.

Shrigley’s playful absurdity draws on references that we can all share and is amplified in this instance with colour and minimal text. Serious issues such as death, love, insecurity and in this case art history, are unapologetically tackled head on. Like all of his work, its strength lies in its deceptive simplicity and the power of engaging the viewer with laughter.

David Shrigley was born in 1968 in Macclesfield, UK. He is now based in Glasgow, Scotland. Best known for his distinctive drawing style and works that make satirical comments on everyday situations and human interactions. His quick-witted drawings and hand-rendered texts are typically deadpan in their humour and reveal chance utterings like snippets of over-heard conversations. Reoccurring themes and thoughts pervade his story telling capturing child-like views of the world, the perspective of aliens and monsters or the compulsive habits of an eavesdropper shouting out loud. While drawing is at the centre of his practice, the artist also works across an extensive range of media including sculpture, large-scale installation, animation, painting, photography and music. Shrigley consistently seeks to widen his public by operating frequently outside the gallery sphere such as in prolific artist publications and collaborative music projects. In 2012 he co-authored a ‘sort-of-opera’ titled ‘Pass the Spoon’, and more recently he transformed the Gallery at Sketch café in London as part of a long-term programme of artist-conceived restaurants.

His digital animations such as ‘Headless Drummer’ and ‘The Artist’ demonstrate what Shrigley calls ‘the economy of telling stories’, delivering a deftly crafted mix of dark and light through the simplest of forms. In his sculptural works that explore materials such as bronze and ceramic, the artist makes physical some of his more curious and eccentric propositions by transforming found objects or by playing with their scale. Taking Lewis Carroll’s perspective of Wonderland, Shrigley enlarges objects and imbues them with curious proportions.

Red Bull Studio Collectives @ Hoxton Gallery, DreamBagsJaguarShoes and No. 90 / from 28th January – 13th March 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: various

@
Hoxton Gallery, 59 Old Street, London EC1V 9HX

DreamBagsJaguarShoes, 32-34 Kingsland Road, London E2 8DA

No. 90, Main Yard, Wallis Road, London E9 5LN

Free entry

www.redbullstudios.com

Red Bull Studio Collectives series launches with a focus on bringing artists together in a cross-disciplinary project. Collectives sees artists select a young collaborator to work with and, combining creative minds both emerging and established, together they are challenged to create unique and exciting pieces of art that push limitations and provoke viewers. Based across three east London locations with one-of-a-kind collaborative installations for you to experience.

Leif Podhajsky and Eva Papamargariti @ Hoxton Gallery
(28th January – 8th February)

Combining their common interests, Leif and Eva are using their partnership to explore the individualism of interpretation in relation to visual language. Pursuing a symbiosis between Eva’s digital techniques and Podhaisky’s trademark patterns; “The Language of dreams” explores the meaning of a visual language, bringing to life thoughts, ideas and dreams through visual manifestations.

Alice Dunseath and Matteo Mastrandrea @ DreamBagsJaguarShoes
(28th January – 13th March)
Expanding on their own individual projects, Matteo and Alice have drawn influence from Object Oriented Ontology, a philosophy based on the idea that everything is connected, contrary to the egocentrism of humanity. In a room filled with the central colours of the spectrum, one can ponder one’s place within the web of existence, while experiencing some of Dunseath’s crystal formations taking on a life of their own.

Netta Peltola and Hortense Duthilleux @ No. 90
(29th January – 9th February)

“Latitude’ utilises No. 90 as a public space, remaining open to all for the exhibition’s duration. With this organic flow, the installation will respond to the relative amount of energy and collective movement within the space at any one time, revealing and concealing fragments of choreographed light. Using the passage of the sun as a means to express energy throughout the course of the day, ’Latitude’ creates an immersive, interactive space.

Eddie Peake The Forever Loop @ Barbican Centre: The Curve / until 10th January 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Sat–Wed 11am–8pm
Thu–Fri 11am–9pm
Closed: 24, 25, 26 Dec
Sun 27 Dec 11am–8pm
Mon 28 Dec 12noon–8pm
Thu 31 Dec 11am–6pm

@ Barbican Centre, The Curve, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS

Free entry

www.barbican.org.uk

London-based artist Eddie Peake combines live performance with sculpture, video, installation and painting to create an energetic gallery experience.

Sexuality and desire are constant themes in Peake’s live performances that typically foreground the naked body.

The Forever Loop presents a choreographed, looped performance that weaves in and out of synchronisation with a video of past performances, a home movie from his childhood and a film shot at the studio of koollondon.com.

Set against a backdrop of large scale installations from maze-like, plastered wall structures that frame both the viewer and performer to a raised scaffold walkway, the performers move in and out of the spaces taking the viewer on a dramatic journey, while a sheer suited roller skater glides fluidly through the space.

The installation is populated with surreal objects Including a cast of Perspex bears, brightly coloured whale bones, a metal figure with an acrylic box head filled with autobiographical items, as well as delicate bronze pipettes nestled on shelves with plaster sculptures.

Nudity included! No photos allowed!

Poundshop presents: The Garage Sale @ Somerset House / until Sunday 13th December 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Friday 10am-10pm
Saturday 10am-6pm
Sunday 10am-4pm

@ Somerset House, New Wing, Lancaster Place, London WC2R 1LA

Entry: £3 for charity

www.thepoundshop.org
www.somersethouse.org.uk

New pop-up event where designers are selling stock from past seasons, prototypes, work in progress and samples. Prices will range from our £1 items all the way up to £100.

The Garage Sale will bring these products from over 50 designers into one specially curated space designed by BAT Studio. Customers will be able to get their hands on items that are not available in any shop and is perfect for those who might have missed a particular item the first time around or design lovers on a budget, searching for unique Christmas presents.

Products include:
– Arnold Circus stools by Martino Gamper
– One-off scarves designed by Malika Favre
– Animation stills by Johnny Kelly
– Prints by HelloVon
– Illustrated cards and mugs by Lisa Jones Studio
– Sunglasses by Craig&Karl
– And loads more!

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