Tag: art (page 1 of 21)

426㎡ at StolenSpace Gallery until 29 April 2018

A group show featuring the creative talents from skateboarding and beyond. ‘426㎡’ will dissect and explore the ever present relationship between skateboarding and art, giving us an intimate look at it’s DIY nature. 🤟

There is little wonder why so many skateboarders make art. Both outlets serve similar purposes, they offer the access to freedom of expression and can both be solitary activities; the onus is on you to create, nobody else. ‘426㎡’ is a reflection of the community itself. The work conveys a diverse understanding of what it means to make art and how we as skateboarders don’t limit ourselves to any medium or subject matter. From Arran Gregory’s abstract use of geometry to Jon Horner’s playful characters, the art of skateboarding is as multifaceted as the culture that inspires it. ‘426㎡’ will display this diversity of creation in a two week exhibition, showcasing some of the most well respected artists and illustrators from skateboarding and beyond.

Contributing artists; Andrew Pommier, Arran Gregory, Artista, Ben Gore, Blondey McCoy, Chet Childress, D*Face, Darren John, Domas Glatkauskas, Ed Templeton, Eloise Dorr, Fos, Ged Wells, Glen Fox, Goldie, Gregory Conroy, Gaurab Thakali, Haroshi, Jack Pearce, James Jarvis, Jeremy Jones, Jon Horner, Liisa Chisholm, Lucas Beaufort, Luka Pinto, Mark Gonzales, Matthew Bromley, Nick Jensen, Oko, Pontus Alv, Rainyrainforest, Shepard Fairey, Will Sweeney, Zin V.

www.stolenspace.com/portfolio_page/llsb-426m2
www.llsbdonate.com

Location:
StolenSpace Gallery, 17 Osborn Street, London UK E1 6TD

Times:
Monday closed
Tuesday – Friday 11am – 7pm
Saturday – Sunday 11am – 6pm

Entry:
Free

Fred Wilson: Afro Kismet at Pace Gallery until 27 April 2018

An exhibition featuring the artist’s most recent body of work originally produced for the 15th Istanbul Biennial in the autumn of 2017. The exhibition will be Wilson’s first at Pace London. On the occasion of Afro Kismet, Pace will publish a catalogue that will include an introduction by artist duo and Istanbul Biennial curators Elmgreen & Dragset, an essay by the Biennial’s Director Bige Örer, and an interview with the artist conducted by American novelist, playwright and essayist Darryl Pinckney. 👀

The genesis of the exhibition stretches back to 1992 when Wilson presented Re:Claiming Egypt, at the 4th International Cairo Biennale and to 2003 when Wilson represented the United States at the 50th Venice Biennale with Speak of Me as I Am. Wilson’s interest in Istanbul had been piqued for a long time; he conceived of the city as the third leg in a historically and culturally connected eastern Mediterranean triangle which also included Cairo and Venice. Through his research, Wilson developed a conceptual basis for the Istanbul project in which he contextualized pieces from the city’s Pera Museum’s Orientalist collection with new and existing works of his own. “My work is about an issue which is both personal and universal. […] A new meaning emerges from the coming together of art and history […] bring[ing] a fresh perspective to things we are used to seeing in museums. You can say that I tell a history which is not adequately discussed…” Fred Wilson, 2017.

For Pace, Wilson will reconfigure Afro Kismet which includes two chandeliers, two monumental Iznik tile walls, four black glass drip works, and a globe sculpture, as well as installations and vitrine pieces that gather cowrie shells, engravings, photographs, a Yoruba mask, and furniture, among other objects that the artist discovered in his frequent trips to Istanbul throughout 2016 and 2017. Since Venice Biennale in 2003, Wilson’s Murano glass chandeliers, with their shifts in scale, color, and complexity, have become vehicles for the artist’s meditations on blackness, death, and beauty. New chandeliers, included in the exhibition, combine black Murano glass with traditional metal and glass elements of Ottoman chandeliers, thus fusing two histories of craftsmanship and symbolizing the complex relationship between the Venetian and Ottoman Empires.

Throughout the exhibition, Wilson utilizes alluring materials—from richly coloured tiles walls to luminescent glass—to represent and investigate the long-ignored presence of communities of African descent in Turkey. In the two Iznik tile walls, the Arabic calligraphy translates in one case to “Mother Africa” and in the other “Black is Beautiful”. The new globe sculpture titled “Trade Winds” refers not to its original meaning, related to weather patterns, but to the complex and tragic global trade in human beings. The juxtaposition of recent works by Wilson with works from the 19th century – including Orientalist paintings with African subject matter by Alfred De Dreux and William James Müller – not only questions notions of universal knowledge and truth, but also sheds light on a history not thoroughly examined. By combining contemporary objects and museum-quality artefacts, Wilson challenges the assumptions of exhibition methodology and art historical scholarship.

www.pacegallery.com/exhibitions/12917/afro-kismet

Location:
Pace Gallery, 6 Burlington Gardens, London W1S 3ET

Times:
Tuesday – Saturday 10am – 6pm

Entry:
Free

The Other Art Fair: presented by Saatchi Art at Victoria House until 25 March 2018

UK’s favourite fair to meet and buy art direct from the very best emerging and undiscovered artists. Presenting 130 of the best emerging artists handpicked by a committee of art industry experts. 👩‍🎨 🎨 🖌

Celebrated for its unique visitor experience, The Other Art Fair’s Spring London edition will continue to delight and inspire art lovers with a tightly curated and distinctive programme of fair features that will create a platform for the ‘unexpected’ at the fair.

RSVP on Facebook

www.theotherartfair.com

Location:
Victoria House, Southampton Row, London WC1A 2QP

Times:
Saturday 11am – 7pm
Sunday 11am – 6pm

Price:
From £8 book online

The Female Gaze at Getty Images Gallery until 14 March 2018

2017 was the Year of Women: it began with massive women’s marches in the US and ended with a series of high-profile resignations by powerful men over sexual harassment scandals. 🙎 👀

This groundswell of feminism may have erupted in response to current events, but it has also been slowly and steadily growing for decades. Over the past five years, female photographers have actively sought to redefine the manner and styles in which women are visually represented across advertising, film, and other media.

In response to this change, Getty Images has recruited a new generation of image makers and partnered with a number of organizations such as LeanIn.org, Refinery 29, and Muslim Girl to expand and evolve the photographic landscape.

www.gettyimagesgallery.co.uk/exhibitions/archive/the-female-gaze

Location:
Getty Images Gallery, 46 Eastcastle Street, London W1W 8DX

Times:
Monday – Friday 10am – 5:30pm
Saturday 12pm – 5:30pm

Price:
Free entry

Giorgio Griffa: A Continuous Becoming at Camden Arts Centre until 8 April 2018

Abstract painter Giorgio Griffa, closely linked to the Arte Povera movement, first became known in the 1960s as part of an Italian generation of artists who sought to radically redefine painting. 🎨

Believing in the ‘intelligence of painting’, Griffa allows the essential elements of his process, such as the type or width of the brush, the colour or dilution of the paint and the nature of the canvas, whether linen, cotton, hemp or jute, to influence and form the work. Griffa’s approach is performative and time-based – often working horizontally on the floor, his rhythmic, formal gestures soak into the unprimed and unstretched material. Griffa’s minimal and primordial marks extend from his fascination with quantum energy, time-space mathematics, the golden ratio and the memory of visual experience since time immemorial. Suggesting the ongoing and organic life of the painting, lines and brushstrokes are deliberately cut short and the canvas is never filled; never a finished or complete object, but a process viewed in the moment.

www.camdenartscentre.org/whats-on/view/griffa

Location:
Camden Arts Centre, Arkwright Road, London NW3 6DG

Times:
Tuesday – Sunday 10:00am – 6:00pm
Wednesdays 10:00am – 9:00pm
Closed Mondays

Price:
Free entry

Red Star Over Russia: A revolution in visual culture 1905-55 at Tate Modern until 18 February 2018

A dramatic visual history of Russia and the Soviet Union from 1905 to the death of Stalin – seen through the eyes of artists, designers and photographers. 🇷🇺

2017 marks the centenary of the October Revolution. Rebellion brought hope, chaos, heroism and tragedy as the Russian Empire became the Soviet Union, endured revolutions, civil war, famine, dictatorship and Nazi invasion. A new visual culture arose and transformed the fabric of everyday life.

The core of this exhibition comes from the extraordinary collection of photographer and graphic designer David King (1943–2016). He started his collection of over 250,000 items relating to this period while working for The Sunday Times Magazine in the 1970s. The collection was acquired by Tate in 2016.

This show is an opportunity to see the rare propaganda posters, prints and photographs collected by King – some bearing traces of state censorship. Including work by El Lissitzky, Gustav Klutsis, Dmitri Moor, Aleksandr Deineka, Nina Vatolina and Yevgeny Khaldei, it is a thrilling journey through a momentous period in world history.

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/red-star-over-russia

Location:
Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Times:
Sunday – Thursday 10am – 6pm
Friday – Saturday 10am – 10pm

Price:
£11.30 book online

Age of Terror: Art since 9/11 at Imperial War Museum until 28 May 2018

See the UK’s first major exhibition of artists’ responses to war and conflict since the terrorist attacks on 11 September 2001. The exhibition features more than 40 British and international artists, including Ai Weiwei, Grayson Perry, Gerhard Richter, Jenny Holzer, Mona Hatoum, Alfredo Jaar, Coco Fusco and Jake & Dinos Chapman. ☣️⚠️☠️💣

The complex issues surrounding the global response to 9/11, the nature of modern warfare and the continuing state of emergency in which we find ourselves have become compelling subject matter for contemporary artists.

Artists’ unique ways of communicating through their art provide different levels of understanding. The stories they tell, whether first or second-hand, come from alternative viewpoints not always reflected in the mainstream media, often challenge our perceptions.

Through 50 works of art including film, sculpture, painting, installations, photography and prints, many of which are exhibited publicly in the UK for the first time, this exhibition highlights the crucial role of artists in representing contemporary conflict.

www.iwm.org.uk/exhibitions/iwm-london/age-of-terror-art-since-911

Location:
IWM London, Lambeth Road, London SE1 6HZ

Times:
10am – 6pm daily

Price:
Adults £15 book online

The Glass Room pop-up until Sunday 12 November 2017

A disruptive tech store with nothing for sale. Instead, it challenges you to reconsider the technologies you use every day, how much they reveal about you, and what choices you can make in our quantified society. 💻 📱

The Glass Room is a pop-up tech store with a twist. At first glance, it offers the latest in shiny digital consumer products, such as the newest tablet, fitness tracker or facial recognition software. But as you go inside, you’ll find there is nothing for sale.

Instead, as you look closer at the ‘products’ on display, you’ll see that they are playfully and provocatively selected to turn the technologies we all use on their head. The artworks, design pieces, and ‘Ingenius’ staff welcome you to take a look behind the screens into the hidden world of what happens to your data. Dig deeper into how much we reveal about ourselves!

www.theglassroom.org

Location:
The Glass Room, 69-71 Charing Cross Road, London WC2H 0NE

Times:
12pm – 8pm

Price:
Free entry

(X) A Fantasy @ DRAF / until 7th October 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Thu—Sat, 12–6 pm
Tue—Wed (by appointment only)

@ David Roberts Art Foundation (DRAF), Symes Mews, London NW1 7JE

www.davidrobertsartfoundation.com

When does the individual experience become a political statement? Over thirty artworks explore the subversion of the quotidian and the transgression of boundaries between public and private spheres. Living, eating, dancing, seducing, reading, watching films, going online; the exhibition traces how individual and collective engagements make the political personal.

An exhibition of new commissions and works by historical and contemporary artists. With Dora Budor, Helen Chadwick, Keren Cytter, Jimmy DeSana, Theaster Gates, Harry Gruyaert, Celia Hempton, Melike Kara, Tala Madani, Paul Maheke, France-Lise McGurn, Pierre Molinier, Julian Opie, Hannah Quinlan and Rosie Hastings, Megan Rooney, Prem Sahib, Wolfgang Tillmans, Danh Vo and Zoe Williams.

DRAF is an independent, non-profit organisation for contemporary art. Since it was founded in 2007, DRAF has welcomed over 100,000 visitors to international programmes including exhibitions, commissions, performances and discussions. To date, DRAF has partnered with over 100 museums, institutions, and not for profit organisations and collaborated with over 1,000 artists.

Here We Are @ Burberry / until 1st October 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10am – 9pm

@ Old Sessions House, 22 Clerkenwell Green, London EC1R 0NA

Free entry

www.burberry.com/london-fashion-week/september-show-2017/the-exhibition

Introducing an exhibition of British photography – curated by Christopher Bailey, Lucy Kumara Moore and Alasdair McLellan – in celebration of the September 2017 collection.

The 18th-century Grade II listed building plays host to our two week-long exhibition, spanning three floors in 14 unique rooms.

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