Tag: art (page 1 of 18)

David Shrigley: Drawings and Paintings @ Stephen Friedman Gallery / until 20th April 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
10am – 6pm (Tuesday to Friday)
11am – 5pm Saturday

@ Stephen Friedman Gallery, 25-28 Old Burlington Street, London W1S 3AN

Free entry

www.stephenfriedman.com/artists/david-shrigley

Eighth solo show by acclaimed British artist David Shrigley. Using acrylic paint and oil stick, he returns to his ubiquitous satirical combination of drawing and text with new large-scale works on paper. Working with oil stick for the first time, here Shrigley riffs on Op Art, with insertions of dry humour that cut to the point of human nature and everyday situations.

This exhibition runs concurrent with a major touring solo show organised by the British Council, enititled ‘Lose Your Mind’, which travels to Museo De Arte Contemporaneo, Santiago, Chile in May 2016. It also prefigures Shrigley’s ‘Really Good’ which will be unveiled in Trafalgar Square, for the Fourth Plinth Commission in September 2016.

For this show the artist turns his sharp art historical critique to optical art. This 1960s development in painting bewitches the eye, creating realistic movement or dimension where there is none. Through Shrigley’s lens and wiggly script the effect is totally undermined, ridiculing the smoothness of design particularly when paired with the mundane everyday subjects that Shrigley often engages with.

Using oil stick, Shrigley’s characteristic line is rendered as though he were drawing with a pencil, but is characterised here by the textured opacity of the material. The brightly-coloured paint, thicker and less controllable than pencil, brings Shrigley’s characteristic imaginings into a new dimension. These works undermine the distinction between painting and drawing, having the lightness of touch and deceptive simplicity of his drawing.

Shrigley’s practice is rich and varied, always underlined with an appreciation of the absurd, the overlooked and the necessity of humour. His subtle, darkly amusing work provides an antidote to everyday life. His skeptical project continues to delight, making us wonder where the never-ending stream of propositions, dilemmas and situations come from to fuel his imagination. Acerbic, weirdly profound and at the same time universal; his work does not require explanation. We are left to our own interpretations; it is whatever we take it to be. Displayed together in this way, the drawings in this exhibition form a fragmented dialogue. The viewer is bombarded with messages, in a way that it is pleasantly exciting. Rather than being confusing, the works create a warm buzz of humorous ambiguity.

The fundamental elements of Shrigley’s practice; the combination of pointedly witty text with immediately recognisable imagery, are maximised here. Having consistently experimented with work across different media, drawing remains the mainstay of Shrigley’s oeuvre. The use of coloured oil stick on primed paper is new to Shrigley’s practice, but relies on the same premise as the black and white drawings for which he is known.

Shrigley’s playful absurdity draws on references that we can all share and is amplified in this instance with colour and minimal text. Serious issues such as death, love, insecurity and in this case art history, are unapologetically tackled head on. Like all of his work, its strength lies in its deceptive simplicity and the power of engaging the viewer with laughter.

David Shrigley was born in 1968 in Macclesfield, UK. He is now based in Glasgow, Scotland. Best known for his distinctive drawing style and works that make satirical comments on everyday situations and human interactions. His quick-witted drawings and hand-rendered texts are typically deadpan in their humour and reveal chance utterings like snippets of over-heard conversations. Reoccurring themes and thoughts pervade his story telling capturing child-like views of the world, the perspective of aliens and monsters or the compulsive habits of an eavesdropper shouting out loud. While drawing is at the centre of his practice, the artist also works across an extensive range of media including sculpture, large-scale installation, animation, painting, photography and music. Shrigley consistently seeks to widen his public by operating frequently outside the gallery sphere such as in prolific artist publications and collaborative music projects. In 2012 he co-authored a ‘sort-of-opera’ titled ‘Pass the Spoon’, and more recently he transformed the Gallery at Sketch café in London as part of a long-term programme of artist-conceived restaurants.

His digital animations such as ‘Headless Drummer’ and ‘The Artist’ demonstrate what Shrigley calls ‘the economy of telling stories’, delivering a deftly crafted mix of dark and light through the simplest of forms. In his sculptural works that explore materials such as bronze and ceramic, the artist makes physical some of his more curious and eccentric propositions by transforming found objects or by playing with their scale. Taking Lewis Carroll’s perspective of Wonderland, Shrigley enlarges objects and imbues them with curious proportions.

Red Bull Studio Collectives @ Hoxton Gallery, DreamBagsJaguarShoes and No. 90 / from 28th January – 13th March 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: various

@
Hoxton Gallery, 59 Old Street, London EC1V 9HX

DreamBagsJaguarShoes, 32-34 Kingsland Road, London E2 8DA

No. 90, Main Yard, Wallis Road, London E9 5LN

Free entry

www.redbullstudios.com

Red Bull Studio Collectives series launches with a focus on bringing artists together in a cross-disciplinary project. Collectives sees artists select a young collaborator to work with and, combining creative minds both emerging and established, together they are challenged to create unique and exciting pieces of art that push limitations and provoke viewers. Based across three east London locations with one-of-a-kind collaborative installations for you to experience.

Leif Podhajsky and Eva Papamargariti @ Hoxton Gallery
(28th January – 8th February)

Combining their common interests, Leif and Eva are using their partnership to explore the individualism of interpretation in relation to visual language. Pursuing a symbiosis between Eva’s digital techniques and Podhaisky’s trademark patterns; “The Language of dreams” explores the meaning of a visual language, bringing to life thoughts, ideas and dreams through visual manifestations.

Alice Dunseath and Matteo Mastrandrea @ DreamBagsJaguarShoes
(28th January – 13th March)
Expanding on their own individual projects, Matteo and Alice have drawn influence from Object Oriented Ontology, a philosophy based on the idea that everything is connected, contrary to the egocentrism of humanity. In a room filled with the central colours of the spectrum, one can ponder one’s place within the web of existence, while experiencing some of Dunseath’s crystal formations taking on a life of their own.

Netta Peltola and Hortense Duthilleux @ No. 90
(29th January – 9th February)

“Latitude’ utilises No. 90 as a public space, remaining open to all for the exhibition’s duration. With this organic flow, the installation will respond to the relative amount of energy and collective movement within the space at any one time, revealing and concealing fragments of choreographed light. Using the passage of the sun as a means to express energy throughout the course of the day, ’Latitude’ creates an immersive, interactive space.

Eddie Peake The Forever Loop @ Barbican Centre: The Curve / until 10th January 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Sat–Wed 11am–8pm
Thu–Fri 11am–9pm
Closed: 24, 25, 26 Dec
Sun 27 Dec 11am–8pm
Mon 28 Dec 12noon–8pm
Thu 31 Dec 11am–6pm

@ Barbican Centre, The Curve, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS

Free entry

www.barbican.org.uk

London-based artist Eddie Peake combines live performance with sculpture, video, installation and painting to create an energetic gallery experience.

Sexuality and desire are constant themes in Peake’s live performances that typically foreground the naked body.

The Forever Loop presents a choreographed, looped performance that weaves in and out of synchronisation with a video of past performances, a home movie from his childhood and a film shot at the studio of koollondon.com.

Set against a backdrop of large scale installations from maze-like, plastered wall structures that frame both the viewer and performer to a raised scaffold walkway, the performers move in and out of the spaces taking the viewer on a dramatic journey, while a sheer suited roller skater glides fluidly through the space.

The installation is populated with surreal objects Including a cast of Perspex bears, brightly coloured whale bones, a metal figure with an acrylic box head filled with autobiographical items, as well as delicate bronze pipettes nestled on shelves with plaster sculptures.

Nudity included! No photos allowed!

Poundshop presents: The Garage Sale @ Somerset House / until Sunday 13th December 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Friday 10am-10pm
Saturday 10am-6pm
Sunday 10am-4pm

@ Somerset House, New Wing, Lancaster Place, London WC2R 1LA

Entry: £3 for charity

www.thepoundshop.org
www.somersethouse.org.uk

New pop-up event where designers are selling stock from past seasons, prototypes, work in progress and samples. Prices will range from our £1 items all the way up to £100.

The Garage Sale will bring these products from over 50 designers into one specially curated space designed by BAT Studio. Customers will be able to get their hands on items that are not available in any shop and is perfect for those who might have missed a particular item the first time around or design lovers on a budget, searching for unique Christmas presents.

Products include:
– Arnold Circus stools by Martino Gamper
– One-off scarves designed by Malika Favre
– Animation stills by Johnny Kelly
– Prints by HelloVon
– Illustrated cards and mugs by Lisa Jones Studio
– Sunglasses by Craig&Karl
– And loads more!

Future Artefacts @ Shoreditch Studios / from Friday 23rd till Sunday 25th October 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Friday 12.00 – 20.00
Saturday 10.00 – 20.00
Sunday 12.00 – 18.00

@ Shoreditch Studios, 37 Batemans Row, London EC2A 3HH

www.futureartefacts.com

Future of physical media; the world’s most progressive music, arts publishing, fashion and tech companies will be selling exclusive products at the fair.

Forty of the most exciting producers of physical media will present their finest products in a luxury environment for the inaugural FUTURE ARTEFACTS fair in 2015.

Everything from record labels and arts publishers to tech companies and artists, you can expect to see 3D printed music totems, fabric with patterns generated by sonic algorithms, experience Bjork’s Stonemilk video on Oculus Rift, and buy exclusive vinyl pressings, DIY synthesisers, prints and special editions of art and photo books.

Artisan food and drink will be supplied by leading London caterers in two bars, including one outdoor covered and heated area with film screenings.

Exhibitors:
Aesop, AMC Books, AnOther, Astral Black, Beatwoven, Baron Magazine, Bemojake, Big Dada, Butterz, Claire de Rouen, Diagonal, Ditto Press, Eros, Four Corners, GOST Books, Here Press & Loose Joints, Huntleys & Palmers, In Other Words, Knives, Kodoji, Landfill Editions, LuckyMe, Ninja Tune, One Little Indian, PAN, REGA, Reify, Ridinghouse, SPBH Editions, Sorika, Stolen Recordings, Studio Operative, Technology Will Save Us, Trolley Books and more!

The Big Blue @ Ordovas Gallery / until 12th December 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Tue-Fri: 10:00-18:00
Sat: 11:00-15:00

@ Ordovas Gallery, 25 Savile Row, London W1S 2ER

Free entry

www.ordovasart.com

Conceived by Damien Hirst and curated by Ordovas.

The Big Blue explores some of the ways in which the sea influences art, by looking at works that span many centuries from Roman times until today. Our intention is to offer an original and penetrating glimpse into a universal theme.

The London Open @ Whitechapel Gallery / until 6th September 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Tue, Wed, Fri, Sat, Sun 11am-6pm
Thursday 11am-9pm

@ Galleries 1, 8 & 9,  Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High Street, London E1 7QX

Free entry

www.whitechapelgallery.org

Presenting the most innovative art made across the Capital. Discover the latest trends in contemporary art, and see paintings and sculptures, film and photography from 48 artists working in London today.

A panel of high profile art world figures selected the artists from a record number of 2,133 applicants!

The London Illustration Fair @ Hoxton Arches / from Friday 10th July until Sunday 12th July 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Friday 2pm–10pm
Saturday 12–8pm
Sunday 12–6pm

@ Hoxton Arches, Arch 402, London E2 8HD

Tickets: £5 general admission (students get 50% off Friday launch party tickets with promotional code ‘cosmic’)

www.thelondonillustrationfair.co.uk

Back with their fourth event Summer Festival: Psychedelia. A psychedelic inspired cosmic universe, showcasing mind altering artworks from creative agencies, collectives, publications, textile designers, visual artists and print studios from around the UK.

Line-up and activities:
14 exhibitor stands, including Material Gallery, Belly Kids, Pirrip Press, Brothers of the Stripe, Ben Oakley Gallery, East London Printmakers, Not Another Bill, The Flood Gallery and many more.

A featured wall, exhibiting exclusive prints from a selection of handpicked artists. Keep you eyes peeled for the likes of Steve Thomas, Paul Blow, Saskia Pomeroy, Supermundane and Pâté. But hurry, each print is in an edition of 20 so once it’s sold, it’s gone for good!

‘Print your own Magic Mushroom’ screen printing workshop with Hello Print Studio, silent Wes Wilson auction, The London Illustration Fair print shop, street food vendors, live music, DJs and a fully stocked summer bar.

Signage tomfoolery! @hoxton_arches

A photo posted by The London Illustration Fair (@thelondonillustrationfair) on

Richard Prince: New Portraits @ Gagosian Gallery / until 1st August 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue–Sat 10-6

@ Gagosian Gallery, 17-19 Davies Street, London W1K 3DE

Free entry

www.gagosian.com

Innovative love it or hate it exhibition showcasing plagiarised works designed to make you think about all the taboo subjects including sexuality, feminism, stereotypes and people’s roles in society.

‘In 1984 I took some portraits. The way I did it was different. The way had nothing to do with the tradition of portraiture. If you wanted me to do your portrait, you would give me at least five photographs that had already been taken of yourself, that were in your possession (you owned them, they were yours), and more importantly . . . you were already happy with. You give me the five you liked and I would pick the one I liked. I would rephotograph the one I liked and that would be your portrait. Simple. Direct. To the point . . .’

Sprayed @ Gagosian Gallery / until 1st August 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue–Sat 10am-6pm

@ Gagosian Gallery, 6-24 Britannia St, London WC1X 9JD

Free entry

www.gagosian.com

This extensive exhibition spanning four generations explores the myriad ways in which artists have employed the impulsive yet de-personalized and non-gestural forces of SPRAY.

It begins with Paul Klee’s work on paper Seltsames Theater (1929), where he improvised with a blowpipe to achieve hazy background effects in a circus scene. This tentative experiment presaged the bold and diverse artistic licence that would come with the post-war advent of aerosol paint as a consumer product and the use of the industrial paint compressor.

From the mid-1950s, sculptor David Smith sprayed enamels over various studio objects and offcuts laid on canvas and paper as stencils; the resulting images recalled Paleolithic cave paintings made by blowing pigment over hands pressed flat. John Chamberlain blurred the lines between painting and sculpture by torquing scrap automobile parts into painterly abstractions, then enhancing the original paint surface with fresh sprays of coloured lacquer. Lawrence Weiner’s interaction with the medium resulted in a simple, dispassionate instruction: Two Minutes of Spray Paint Directly Upon the Floor From a Standard Aerosol Spray Can (1968); while Martin Barré tested it at different distances and pressures in a series of rapid strikes producing sequences of stripes and cryptic punctuations on paper.

From the late sixties, spray assumed a new scale and level of exposure, from Dan Christensen’s vast “post-painterly” abstractions—where he used a spray gun to create intersecting coloured loops of paint alive with cool-tempered energies—and Jules Olitski’s ethereal gradations of tone, texture, and depth; to Richard Artschwager’s furtive urban Blps; Jean-Michel Basquiat’s existential aphorisms tagged on New York City walls; and Keith Haring’s exuberant political pictography that covered bodies, canvases, and subways. In the ultimate debunking of Ab Ex posturing, Andy Warhol produced a series of alchemical Oxidation Paintings by urinating on canvases primed with metallic paint.

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