Tag: art exhibitions (page 1 of 2)

426㎡ at StolenSpace Gallery until 29 April 2018

A group show featuring the creative talents from skateboarding and beyond. ‘426㎡’ will dissect and explore the ever present relationship between skateboarding and art, giving us an intimate look at it’s DIY nature. 🤟

There is little wonder why so many skateboarders make art. Both outlets serve similar purposes, they offer the access to freedom of expression and can both be solitary activities; the onus is on you to create, nobody else. ‘426㎡’ is a reflection of the community itself. The work conveys a diverse understanding of what it means to make art and how we as skateboarders don’t limit ourselves to any medium or subject matter. From Arran Gregory’s abstract use of geometry to Jon Horner’s playful characters, the art of skateboarding is as multifaceted as the culture that inspires it. ‘426㎡’ will display this diversity of creation in a two week exhibition, showcasing some of the most well respected artists and illustrators from skateboarding and beyond.

Contributing artists; Andrew Pommier, Arran Gregory, Artista, Ben Gore, Blondey McCoy, Chet Childress, D*Face, Darren John, Domas Glatkauskas, Ed Templeton, Eloise Dorr, Fos, Ged Wells, Glen Fox, Goldie, Gregory Conroy, Gaurab Thakali, Haroshi, Jack Pearce, James Jarvis, Jeremy Jones, Jon Horner, Liisa Chisholm, Lucas Beaufort, Luka Pinto, Mark Gonzales, Matthew Bromley, Nick Jensen, Oko, Pontus Alv, Rainyrainforest, Shepard Fairey, Will Sweeney, Zin V.

www.stolenspace.com/portfolio_page/llsb-426m2
www.llsbdonate.com

Location:
StolenSpace Gallery, 17 Osborn Street, London UK E1 6TD

Times:
Monday closed
Tuesday – Friday 11am – 7pm
Saturday – Sunday 11am – 6pm

Entry:
Free

Crossroads: Kauffman, Judd and Morris at Sprüth Magers until 31 March 2018

The show presents six works from Kauffman’s fertile period of 1966—1971, when he addressed the issues of structure and form in painting, the use of industrial materials, painting’s relationship to the wall, and dematerialisation. His work is contextualised by the inclusion of the stack piece Untitled (Bernstein 80-4) (1980) and the floor piece Untitled, DSS 234 (1970) by Donald Judd and the two felt works Untitled (1968) and Fountain (1971) by Robert Morris, as well as supplemental materials from the Kauffman archives. The exhibition presents the three artists together for the first time in Europe, and is Kauffman’s debut exhibition with the gallery in London. 😍

Although primarily known as a Los Angeles based artist, Craig Kauffman had a long history of engagement with the New York scene. In 1967, Kauffman relocated to New York, encouraged by the successes of his recent exhibitions in the city. While there, he began a friendship with Donald Judd, the artist who coined the phrase “specific objects” to describe his own work, a format which operated between painting and sculpture. Like the work of Judd, Kauffman’s three-dimensional plastic paintings occupy this liminal category. Their volume suggests that they are sculpture, but their presence on the wall reinforces their status as paintings. The unity of colour and form, achieved through the use of industrial materials, is another point of similarity between the two artists’ objectives.

Kauffman’s move to New York also reignited his friendship with Robert Morris, whom he had met in San Francisco ten years earlier. Their frequent discussions resulted in a short lived collaboration for the exhibition Using Walls (Indoors) at the Jewish Museum in 1970, which remained open for only one day, and which Kauffman described as a combination of both of the artists’ ideas. Only a few years prior, Morris begun making process-oriented felt pieces, in which he hung strips of industrial felt on the wall and allowed gravity to determine their shape. This influenced Kauffman’s conception of his series of Loops, in which sheets of spray painted Plexiglas seem to casually droop over a wire.

In Kauffman’s work, the environment constantly shifts as the viewer moves around each object. The light that moves across the curved edges of each piece facilitates the full comprehension of their forms. This draws comparisons to Morris’s own textual formulations in his influential Notes on Sculpture series, which advocated a phenomenological reading of the art object, how they change under varying conditions of light and space. The coloured shadows of the hanging Loops and the cast plastic forms that project into space directly implicate both the viewer and their supports.

Two of the earliest works from 1966 demonstrate how Kauffman addressed some of the issues which were important to Minimalist art and theory: seriality, industrial multiples, and anonymity. But where the New Yorkers’ opted for material and formal austerity—Kauffman’s supple plastic works were coloured and full of curves.

This exhibition is curated by Frank Lloyd, and follows Craig Kauffman: Works from 1962 – 1964 in dialogue with Francis Picabia and Marcel Duchamp, Sprüth Magers debut of the gallery’s representation of the Estate of Craig Kauffman in Berlin in 2016. The show is timed to run concurrently with the gallery’s Los Angeles presentation of Robert Irwin, who, along with Kauffman, was a major force in the definition of art from Los Angeles in the 1960s.

www.spruethmagers.com

Location:
Sprüth Magers, 7 Grafton Street, Mayfair, London W1S 4EJ

Times:
Tue-Sat 11am-6pm

Price:
Free entry

Super Sharp at Fashion Space Gallery until Saturday 21 April 2018

Exploring the appropriation of Italian designer brands in the underground music scenes of Jungle and UK Garage. Versace, Moschino, Iceberg and D&G are examples of labels that ruled the dance floor in the nineties. Moschino, in particular, became synonymous with the look associated with that era. This exhibition draws from an extensive archive amassed by DJ and producer Saul Milton, which also forms the core of the wider series of exhibitions RTRN II JUNGLE. 🎤 🔊

Recently, there has been a revival of interest in the music, style and culture of that time. Even though Jungle and UK Garage took place before the emergence of the Internet, their history is extensively documented online. However, the overlap between their style and the various times there was a revived interest in the music, has meant that a blurry nostalgic image of the time has emerged.

This exhibition attempts to address this by highlighting the voices of people who were actually there at the time, such as Goldie, Fabio & Grooverider, Bushkin, Skibadee, Navigator and PJ & Smiley, Jumpin’ Jack Frost and MC Nyke. Their personal memories shed light on why designer clothing was first embraced by Jungle ravers and then made famous by UK Garage. By combining the music, testimonials and the original garments, it reveals why high-end Italian labels were so important to the cultural and style history of both genres.

www.fashionspacegallery.com/exhibition/super-sharp

Location:
Fashion Space Gallery, London College of Fashion, 20 John Princes Street, London W1G 0BJ

Times:
Monday – Friday 10am 6pm
Saturday 12pm – 4pm (during term time)
Sunday closed

Price:
Free entry

Everything At Once at 180 The Strand until 10 December 2017

Store Studios is hosting an extensive off-site exhibition featuring 24 artists currently shown at Lisson Gallery in celebration of its 50th anniversary.

The stellar line-up presents work by a range of international artists like Ai Weiwei, Anish Kapoor, Marina Abramović, Cory Arcangel, Julian Opie, Richard Long, Lawrence Weiner and more, as well as featuring previous VF collaborators Haroon Mirza, Rodney Graham, Nathalie Djurberg and Hans Berg.

Housed in the striking brutalist environment at Store Studios – home to last year’s show-stopping music and film exhibition The Infinite Mix – Everything At Once probes the multi-sensory simultaneity of contemporary life, first articulated by John Cage in 1966, a year before Lisson Gallery opened its doors.

Neither chronological nor encyclopedic, the show will instead feature 45 interconnected works that exploit the full potential of the space, whether through installation, painting, sculpture, performance or sound.

www.thevinylfactory.com/news/everything-at-once-lisson-store-studios

Doors:
Tuesday – Saturday 12pm-7pm
Sunday 12pm – 6pm

Location:
Store Studios, 180 The Strand, London WC2R 1EA

Price:
Free entry

The World of Anna Sui @ Fashion and Textile Museum / until 1st October 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Tue – Sat, 11am – 6pm (Thu until 8pm)
Sun 11am – 5pm
Mon closed

@ Fashion and Textile Museum, 83 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3XF

Tickets: £9.90 book online

www.ftmlondon.org/ftm-exhibitions/the-world-of-anna-sui

Anna Sui is the classic American fashion designer. From Detroit to New York, her signature rock-n-roll romanticism reinvents pop culture for every new generation.

Since her first catwalk show in 1991, Sui has shaped not only the garments, textiles, accessories, beauty and interiors which comprise her design universe, but also the course of fashion history. The World of Anna Sui features over 100 looks from the designer’s archive, presenting a roll call of archetypes from Surfers and School Girls to Hippies, Mods and Punks. This is the first time an American designer has been the focus of a retrospective exhibition in the UK.

@annasui's newest fragrance, Fantasia, has just arrived EXCLUSIVELY in the Fashion and Textile Museum Shop! Of this perfume, Anna says "It's all about enchantment. In everything I do, I'm always trying to transport you to exotic faraway places, to beautiful new worlds." And Anna has certainly achieved her goal with this fabulous fragrance. With floral notes at it's heart, a delicious raspberry praline top note and scents of Golden Cypress and Himalayan Cedar Wood, this perfume is an extravaganza of woody freshness. The creation is is spellbinding, modern and playful – much like Anna's clothes! Image: @annasui . . . #museum #fashiontextilemuseum #fashiontextile #annasui #annasuicosmetics #perfume #perfumes #museumshop #fashionexhibition #textiledesign #fashionart #designerfashion #unicorn

A post shared by Fashion and Textile Museum (@fashiontextilemuseum) on

Bouchra Khalili @ Lisson Gallery / until 18th March 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Monday–Friday, 10am–6pm
Saturday, 11am–5pm

@ Lisson Gallery, 67 Lisson Street, London NW1 5DA

Free entry

www.lissongallery.com/exhibitions/bouchra-khalili

First major solo exhibition in the United Kingdom by Moroccan-French artist Bouchra Khalili. Based between Berlin, Oslo and Paris, Khalili’s work explores the broad topics of migration and displacement through the mediums of film, video, installation, photography and prints. Largely inspired by the idea of journeys, both literally and conceptually, Khalili’s exhibition at Lisson Gallery lays bare the socially constructed nature of borders and challenges our fixed ideas of identity and nationhood.

Nowhere do the concepts of movement, identity and borders align more poignantly than in Khalili’s multi-channel video installation The Mapping Journey Project (2008–11). Aiming to draw an alternative practice of map-making, the work consists of eight films that focus the audience’s gaze on the tortuous and complex journeys taken by individuals forced to cross borders illegally. These journeys are literally traced onto a large map seen on screen, while the narrators recount the journey factually, vividly filling in the experiential details of their quests. In an essay for MoMA, New York, where the work was recently exhibited, Quinn Latimer notes that “the dark, pen-inked lines of [the migrants’] trajectories create strange and distinct constellations, fluid forms of statelessness that are posited against and over the more familiar coloured shapes and lines they cross – that patchwork of nation-states (colonial and other) that we have all learned to recognise like some international language of signs of the hegemonic world order”.

The abstract traces created in The Mapping Journey Project are realised further in Khalili’s The Constellation Series (2011). Composed of eight silkscreen prints, each of the Constellations translates the voyages recounted in the films into the form of star constellations similar to those that have been used in astronomy for centuries. Stripped of their borders and resisting containment, these journeys become fluid records of travels through space and time.

The final work in the exhibition, Foreign Office (2015), examines ideas of internationalism and solidarity. It is made up of a film, a series of photographs and a print. The work focuses on the city of Algiers and its position as an active site of revolution and anti-colonial movements between 1962-1972, with groups including the African National Congress (ANC) and Black Panthers having headquarters there during this period. Produced with the support of the Sam Art Prize, the film shows two young Algerians ‘re-writing’ history through images, language and oral narratives, while the accompanying series of photographs document the ghostly places that were home to these political movements, at once echoing the disappearance of utopia and its persistence to haunt the present-time.

Intrigue: James Ensor by Luc Tuymans @ Royal Academy of Arts / until 29th January 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Sat-Thu 10am-6pm
Fri 10am-10pm

@ Royal Academy of Arts, The Sackler Wing, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BD

Tickets: £10.50 book online

www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/james-ensor-luc-tuymans

Despite spending his whole professional life in the Belgian seaside town of Ostend, James Ensor was very successful in his lifetime and exerted considerable influence on the development of Expressionism. An innovator and an outsider, he rebelled against the conservative art teachings of the late 19th century academy in Brussels, drawn instead to the avant-garde salons where his radical creative vision could thrive.

Ensor’s childhood spent among the fantastical treasures of his family’s curiosity shop offers a clue as to how the seeds of this wild imagination were sown. The imagery of masks and carnivals runs through much of his work, from vibrant colours and flamboyant costumes to an ever-present sense of drama and satire.

We invited the artist Luc Tuymans, a fellow Belgian and admirer of Ensor, to curate this unique exhibition. Taking a personal view, Tuymans looks back at Ensor’s singular career through a selection of his most bizarrely brilliant and gloriously surreal creations.

Brown’s London Art Weekend @ various venues around Mayfair / until Sunday 3rd July 2016

Browns London Art Weekend

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: various

@ Various venues around Mayfair

Free entry

www.londonartweekend.co.uk

For 150 years Mayfair’s galleries and auction houses have welcomed the world’s greatest art collectors, and this event is the ultimate celebration of this London heartland, rich with art galleries.

Experience the unrivalled quality and diversity of this key art market destination as galleries and auction houses open their doors to the public for this exciting event. With talks, walks, and over 50 exhibitions to see, Brown’s London Art Weekend offers a unique opportunity for art lovers to explore the capital’s greatest private galleries.

Brown’s Hotel, on Albemarle Street, will be the base for the London Art Weekend, offering themed tours and talks with the art experts, and offering a welcoming pitstop where you can indulge in a glass of Ruinart Champagne and an oyster or two in the HIX Mayfair Ruinart and Seafood Bar.

Conflict, Time, Photography @ Tate Modern / until 15th March 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
10.00–18.00 Sun–Thu
10.00–22.00 Fri–Sat

@ Tate Modern, The Eyal Ofer Galleries Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: around £13 book online

From the seconds after a bomb is detonated to a former scene of battle years after a war has ended, this moving exhibition focuses on the passing of time, tracing a diverse and poignant journey through over 150 years of conflict around the world, since the invention of photography.

In an innovative move, the works are ordered according to how long after the event they were created from moments, days and weeks to decades later. Photographs taken seven months after the fire bombing of Dresden are shown alongside those taken seven months after the end of the First Gulf War. Images made in Vietnam 25 years after the fall of Saigon are shown alongside those made in Nakasaki 25 years after the atomic bomb. The result is the chance to make never-before-made connections while viewing the legacy of war as artists and photographers have captured it in retrospect.

Alibis: Sigmar Polke 1963–2010 @ Tate Modern / until 8th February 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Sun–Thu 10:00–18:00
Fri–Sat 10:00–22:00

@ Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: £14.50 book online

www.tate.org.uk

Sigmar Polke was one of the most insatiably experimental artists of the twentieth century.

The retrospective is the first to bring together the unusually broad range of media he worked with during his five-decade career – not only painting, drawing, photography, film and sculpture, but also notebooks, slide projections and photocopies.

He worked in off-the-wall materials ranging from meteor dust to gold, bubble wrap, snail juice, potatoes, soot and even uranium, all the while resisting easy categorisation.

Polke’s relentlessly inventive works range in size from the intimacy of a notebook to monumental paintings. He took a wildly different approach to art-making, from his responses to consumer society in the 1960s to his interest in travel, drugs and communal living in the 1970s and his increasingly experimental practice after 1980.

Beneath Polke’s irreverent wit, promiscuous intelligence, and chance operations lay a deep scepticism of all authority. It would be impossible to understand this attitude, and the creativity that grew out of it, without considering Polke’s biography and its setting.

In 1945, near the end of World War II, his family fled Silesia (in present-day Poland) for what would soon be Soviet-occupied East Germany, and then escaped again, this time to West Germany, in 1953.
Polke grew up at a time when many Germans deflected blame for the atrocities of the Nazi period with the alibi, ‘I didn’t see anything’.

In various works in the exhibition, Polke opposes many Germans of his generation’s tendency to ignore the Nazi past, as if picking off the scab to reopen the wound.

Older posts

© 2018 InFormed London

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑