Tag: art exhibitions (page 1 of 2)

Renzo Piano at Royal Academy of Arts until 20 January 2019

From The Shard in London to the Centre Pompidou in Paris, the buildings of Renzo Piano have enriched cities across the globe. We reveal the vision and invention behind his pioneering work, showing how architecture can touch the human spirit. 🏙 🌆

United by a characteristic sense of lightness, and an interplay between tradition and invention, function and context, Piano’s buildings soar in the public imagination as they do in our skylines. Counting the New York Times Building and the Jean-Marie Tjibaou Cultural Centre in Nouméa among his creations, he has cemented his place as one of the greatest architects of our times.

This illuminating exhibition follows Piano’s career, from the influence of his Genoese heritage and his rise to acclaim alongside friend and collaborator Richard Rogers, to current projects still in the making. Focusing on 16 key buildings, it explores how the Renzo Piano Building Workshop designs buildings “piece by piece”, making deft use of form, material and engineering to achieve a precise and yet poetic elegance.

Marvel in rarely seen drawings, models, photography, signature full-scale maquettes and a new film by Thomas Riedelsheimer that show how inspiring architecture is made. At the heart of the exhibition is an imagined ‘Island’, a specially designed sculptural installation which brings together nearly 100 of Piano’s projects.

Designed and curated in close collaboration with Piano himself, join us for the first exhibition in London to put the spotlight on Piano in 30 years.

www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/renzo-piano

Time:
Daily 10am – 6pm (Friday 10pm)

Place:
The Gabrielle Jungels-Winkler Galleries, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London, W1J 0BD

Tickets:
£12 book online

Lee Bul at Hayward Gallery until 19 August 2018

Lee Bul transforms Hayward Gallery into a spectacular dream-like landscape featuring monstrous bodies, futuristic cyborgs, glittering mirrored environments and an exquisitely surreal monumental foil Zeppelin. 👀 😊 🇰🇷

Bringing together more than 100 works from the late 1980s to the present day, this exhibition explores the full range of Lee Bul’s pioneering and thought-provoking practice, from provocative early performances to recent large-scale installations that attempt to get our body and our brain ‘working at the same time, together’.

For the past three decades, Lee Bul has drawn on diverse sources that include science fiction, visionary architecture and personal experience, whilst making use of deliberately clashing materials that range from silk and mother of pearl to fibreglass and silicone. At the core of her most recent work is an investigation into landscape, which for the artist includes the intimate landscape of the body, ideal or fictional landscapes and the physical world that surrounds us.

www.southbankcentre.co.uk/whats-on/exhibitions/hayward-gallery-art/lee-bul

Location:
Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, 337-338 Belvedere Road, London SE1 8XX

Times:
11am – 7pm every day (Thursday until 9pm)
Closed on Tuesdays

Tickets:
From £13 book online

Julie Becker: I must create a Master Piece to pay the Rent at ICA until 12 August 2018

I must create a Master Piece to pay the Rent is the first survey exhibition devoted to the work of the late Julie Becker (1972–2016). 💷 💷 💷

Embedded in the psychological, cinematic and material geographies of Los Angeles, her home city, Becker produced a legendary, yet underrepresented body of installations, sculpture, drawings, photographs and video. These works speak to the language and mythology of the late 20th century American Dream turned nightmare, drawing from sources as diverse as Stephen King’s The Shining, Disney’s fantasy The Gnome-Mobile, Kay Thompson’s children’s books Eloise and suburban stoner myths espousing the karmic convergence between The Wizard of Oz and Pink Floyd’s The Dark Side of the Moon.

Within Becker’s drawings and videos of dreamlike scenarios, and architectural spaces realised at actual scale or as models, such shared cultural references collide with an idiosyncratic, and at times, dark aura of childish wonder and projection. Becker once stated, ‘A refrigerator box, in American cities, can be the last refuge of the homeless. They’re also temporary places for children to play in.’ In her work, interior spaces appear psychically charged and provisional, conjuring sites for potential refuge and fantastical escape.

Becker reflected on her own living circumstances while constructing altered narratives around other real and fictional lives. Works such as the installation Researchers, Residents, A Place to Rest (1993–1996) and the open-ended series Whole, reflect the artist’s direct experiences of spaces of precarity, such as a single room occupancy hotel or a dilapidated building caught in the flux of real estate speculation. According to writer and filmmaker Chris Kraus, Researchers, Residents, A Place to Rest combines, ‘a Balzacian zeal to excavate urban archaeology through fiction, and a very post-modern willingness to acknowledge the strange penetrations and crossed subjectivities that occurred in the body and mind of the [artist] herself.’ In Whole, Becker channelled the lingering presence of her Echo Park building’s former inhabitant, who had passed away from an AIDS related illness. This multifaceted project of drawings, sculpture, photographs and video moves between an imagined life and the very real spectre of imminent gentrification and displacement.

Throughout her work, Becker navigated the formations of truth, fiction and myth in both the material and symbolic realm. Considering the present historical moment, where a real estate mogul-cum-reality TV celebrity occupies the position of ‘leader of the free world’, Becker’s singular aesthetic visions unerringly articulate the fantasies and dispossessions underpinning the social imaginary of late-capitalism.

www.ica.art/exhibitions/i-must-create-a-master-piece-to-pay-the-rent

Location:
Institute of Contemporary Arts, The Mall, London SW1Y 5AH

Times:
Tuesday – Thursday and Sunday 12pm – 11pm
Friday and Saturday 12pm – 12am

Price:
£1 includes a day membership

True Colours – Helen Beard / Sadie Laska / Boo Saville at Newport Street Gallery until 9 September 2018

Bringing together three emerging artists – Helen Beard (b.1971, Birmingham), Sadie Laska (b.1974, West Virginia) and Boo Saville (b.1980, Norwich) – that, despite using paint in very different ways, all share an interest in exploring the possibilities of colour. Featuring over fifty works, the show is the largest exhibition to date for each artist.

Helen Beard uses a vivid rainbow palette to create interlocking arrangements of bright primary colour, which combine to describe explicit sexual encounters. Working from found images, Beard’s work explores themes relating to gender, sexual psychology and eroticism. Situated part way between abstraction and representation, her figures are reduced to concisely defined fields of vibrant colour, on which a myriad of varied brush marks remain visible. Including a number of new works, one of which is a monumental diptych (The Mirror, 2018), each canvas measuring 3226 x 2743mm, the exhibition spans eight years of Beard’s practice.

New York-based artist Sadie Laska creates dreamlike compositions using paint and collage. Evoking the rebellious post-Pop aesthetic of New York, Laska often incorporates recycled waste materials and found objects into her paintings, sometimes reworking parts of earlier canvases entirely. In Untitled (Pepsi Shape), 2017, the canvas is carved up into contrasting areas, which are roughly painted with acrylic. The resulting amorphous shape evokes the distinctive colours of a can of Pepsi. A member of the underground drum-based band I.U.D., Laska’s paintings are filled with a similar improvised expressiveness and irreverent spirit of performance as her music.

The exhibition features a new series of Boo Saville’s colour field paintings, which are shown in dialogue with a number of black and white canvases. Known formerly for her figurative works in oil on canvas, as well as using everyday materials including biro and bleach, Saville has – since 2014 – been producing large-scale abstracts, made up of flawlessly gradating shades. Saville, whose work investigates mortality, applies up to forty layers of paint to achieve this extraordinary effect, erasing any suggestion of her own mark-making in spite of the emotional tenor of the works. The colour fields are inextricably linked to her black and white canvases, the subjects of the latter – sparingly painted so as to retain the appearance of the canvas weave – resulting from internet searches that occur to her whilst working on the abstracts. She notes: “The black and white paintings are purely about the surface of momentary thought and the colour fields are about the depth and vault of emotion and memory layered on top of each other.

www.newportstreetgallery.com/exhibition/true-colours-helen-beard-sadie-laska-boo-saville

Location:
Newport Street Gallery, Newport Street, London SE11 6AJ

Times:
Tuesday - Sunday 10am - 6pm

Price:
Free entry

Shape of Light: 100 Years of Photography and Abstract Art at Tate Modern until 14 October 2018

For the first time, Tate Modern tells the intertwined stories of photography and abstract art. 📷 🔳 🔲 ◼️

Shape of Light is the first major exhibition to explore the relationship between the two, spanning the century from the 1910s to the present day. It brings to life the innovation and originality of photographers over this period, and shows how they responded and contributed to the development of abstraction.

Key photographs are brought together from pioneers including Man Ray and Alfred Stieglitz, major contemporary artists such as Barbara Kasten and Thomas Ruff, right up to exciting new work by Antony Cairns, Maya Rochat and Daisuke Yokota, made especially for the exhibition.

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/shape-light

Location:
Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Times:
Sunday to Thursday 10.00 – 18.00
Friday to Saturday 10.00 – 22.00

Tickets:
£18 book online

426㎡ at StolenSpace Gallery until 29 April 2018

A group show featuring the creative talents from skateboarding and beyond. ‘426㎡’ will dissect and explore the ever present relationship between skateboarding and art, giving us an intimate look at it’s DIY nature. 🤟

There is little wonder why so many skateboarders make art. Both outlets serve similar purposes, they offer the access to freedom of expression and can both be solitary activities; the onus is on you to create, nobody else. ‘426㎡’ is a reflection of the community itself. The work conveys a diverse understanding of what it means to make art and how we as skateboarders don’t limit ourselves to any medium or subject matter. From Arran Gregory’s abstract use of geometry to Jon Horner’s playful characters, the art of skateboarding is as multifaceted as the culture that inspires it. ‘426㎡’ will display this diversity of creation in a two week exhibition, showcasing some of the most well respected artists and illustrators from skateboarding and beyond.

Contributing artists; Andrew Pommier, Arran Gregory, Artista, Ben Gore, Blondey McCoy, Chet Childress, D*Face, Darren John, Domas Glatkauskas, Ed Templeton, Eloise Dorr, Fos, Ged Wells, Glen Fox, Goldie, Gregory Conroy, Gaurab Thakali, Haroshi, Jack Pearce, James Jarvis, Jeremy Jones, Jon Horner, Liisa Chisholm, Lucas Beaufort, Luka Pinto, Mark Gonzales, Matthew Bromley, Nick Jensen, Oko, Pontus Alv, Rainyrainforest, Shepard Fairey, Will Sweeney, Zin V.

www.stolenspace.com/portfolio_page/llsb-426m2
www.llsbdonate.com

Location:
StolenSpace Gallery, 17 Osborn Street, London UK E1 6TD

Times:
Monday closed
Tuesday – Friday 11am – 7pm
Saturday – Sunday 11am – 6pm

Entry:
Free

Crossroads: Kauffman, Judd and Morris at Sprüth Magers until 31 March 2018

The show presents six works from Kauffman’s fertile period of 1966—1971, when he addressed the issues of structure and form in painting, the use of industrial materials, painting’s relationship to the wall, and dematerialisation. His work is contextualised by the inclusion of the stack piece Untitled (Bernstein 80-4) (1980) and the floor piece Untitled, DSS 234 (1970) by Donald Judd and the two felt works Untitled (1968) and Fountain (1971) by Robert Morris, as well as supplemental materials from the Kauffman archives. The exhibition presents the three artists together for the first time in Europe, and is Kauffman’s debut exhibition with the gallery in London. 😍

Although primarily known as a Los Angeles based artist, Craig Kauffman had a long history of engagement with the New York scene. In 1967, Kauffman relocated to New York, encouraged by the successes of his recent exhibitions in the city. While there, he began a friendship with Donald Judd, the artist who coined the phrase “specific objects” to describe his own work, a format which operated between painting and sculpture. Like the work of Judd, Kauffman’s three-dimensional plastic paintings occupy this liminal category. Their volume suggests that they are sculpture, but their presence on the wall reinforces their status as paintings. The unity of colour and form, achieved through the use of industrial materials, is another point of similarity between the two artists’ objectives.

Kauffman’s move to New York also reignited his friendship with Robert Morris, whom he had met in San Francisco ten years earlier. Their frequent discussions resulted in a short lived collaboration for the exhibition Using Walls (Indoors) at the Jewish Museum in 1970, which remained open for only one day, and which Kauffman described as a combination of both of the artists’ ideas. Only a few years prior, Morris begun making process-oriented felt pieces, in which he hung strips of industrial felt on the wall and allowed gravity to determine their shape. This influenced Kauffman’s conception of his series of Loops, in which sheets of spray painted Plexiglas seem to casually droop over a wire.

In Kauffman’s work, the environment constantly shifts as the viewer moves around each object. The light that moves across the curved edges of each piece facilitates the full comprehension of their forms. This draws comparisons to Morris’s own textual formulations in his influential Notes on Sculpture series, which advocated a phenomenological reading of the art object, how they change under varying conditions of light and space. The coloured shadows of the hanging Loops and the cast plastic forms that project into space directly implicate both the viewer and their supports.

Two of the earliest works from 1966 demonstrate how Kauffman addressed some of the issues which were important to Minimalist art and theory: seriality, industrial multiples, and anonymity. But where the New Yorkers’ opted for material and formal austerity—Kauffman’s supple plastic works were coloured and full of curves.

This exhibition is curated by Frank Lloyd, and follows Craig Kauffman: Works from 1962 – 1964 in dialogue with Francis Picabia and Marcel Duchamp, Sprüth Magers debut of the gallery’s representation of the Estate of Craig Kauffman in Berlin in 2016. The show is timed to run concurrently with the gallery’s Los Angeles presentation of Robert Irwin, who, along with Kauffman, was a major force in the definition of art from Los Angeles in the 1960s.

www.spruethmagers.com

Location:
Sprüth Magers, 7 Grafton Street, Mayfair, London W1S 4EJ

Times:
Tue-Sat 11am-6pm

Price:
Free entry

Super Sharp at Fashion Space Gallery until Saturday 21 April 2018

Exploring the appropriation of Italian designer brands in the underground music scenes of Jungle and UK Garage. Versace, Moschino, Iceberg and D&G are examples of labels that ruled the dance floor in the nineties. Moschino, in particular, became synonymous with the look associated with that era. This exhibition draws from an extensive archive amassed by DJ and producer Saul Milton, which also forms the core of the wider series of exhibitions RTRN II JUNGLE. 🎤 🔊

Recently, there has been a revival of interest in the music, style and culture of that time. Even though Jungle and UK Garage took place before the emergence of the Internet, their history is extensively documented online. However, the overlap between their style and the various times there was a revived interest in the music, has meant that a blurry nostalgic image of the time has emerged.

This exhibition attempts to address this by highlighting the voices of people who were actually there at the time, such as Goldie, Fabio & Grooverider, Bushkin, Skibadee, Navigator and PJ & Smiley, Jumpin’ Jack Frost and MC Nyke. Their personal memories shed light on why designer clothing was first embraced by Jungle ravers and then made famous by UK Garage. By combining the music, testimonials and the original garments, it reveals why high-end Italian labels were so important to the cultural and style history of both genres.

www.fashionspacegallery.com/exhibition/super-sharp

Location:
Fashion Space Gallery, London College of Fashion, 20 John Princes Street, London W1G 0BJ

Times:
Monday – Friday 10am 6pm
Saturday 12pm – 4pm (during term time)
Sunday closed

Price:
Free entry

Everything At Once at 180 The Strand until 10 December 2017

Store Studios is hosting an extensive off-site exhibition featuring 24 artists currently shown at Lisson Gallery in celebration of its 50th anniversary.

The stellar line-up presents work by a range of international artists like Ai Weiwei, Anish Kapoor, Marina Abramović, Cory Arcangel, Julian Opie, Richard Long, Lawrence Weiner and more, as well as featuring previous VF collaborators Haroon Mirza, Rodney Graham, Nathalie Djurberg and Hans Berg.

Housed in the striking brutalist environment at Store Studios – home to last year’s show-stopping music and film exhibition The Infinite Mix – Everything At Once probes the multi-sensory simultaneity of contemporary life, first articulated by John Cage in 1966, a year before Lisson Gallery opened its doors.

Neither chronological nor encyclopedic, the show will instead feature 45 interconnected works that exploit the full potential of the space, whether through installation, painting, sculpture, performance or sound.

www.thevinylfactory.com/news/everything-at-once-lisson-store-studios

Doors:
Tuesday – Saturday 12pm-7pm
Sunday 12pm – 6pm

Location:
Store Studios, 180 The Strand, London WC2R 1EA

Price:
Free entry

The World of Anna Sui @ Fashion and Textile Museum / until 1st October 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Tue – Sat, 11am – 6pm (Thu until 8pm)
Sun 11am – 5pm
Mon closed

@ Fashion and Textile Museum, 83 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3XF

Tickets: £9.90 book online

www.ftmlondon.org/ftm-exhibitions/the-world-of-anna-sui

Anna Sui is the classic American fashion designer. From Detroit to New York, her signature rock-n-roll romanticism reinvents pop culture for every new generation.

Since her first catwalk show in 1991, Sui has shaped not only the garments, textiles, accessories, beauty and interiors which comprise her design universe, but also the course of fashion history. The World of Anna Sui features over 100 looks from the designer’s archive, presenting a roll call of archetypes from Surfers and School Girls to Hippies, Mods and Punks. This is the first time an American designer has been the focus of a retrospective exhibition in the UK.

@annasui's newest fragrance, Fantasia, has just arrived EXCLUSIVELY in the Fashion and Textile Museum Shop! Of this perfume, Anna says "It's all about enchantment. In everything I do, I'm always trying to transport you to exotic faraway places, to beautiful new worlds." And Anna has certainly achieved her goal with this fabulous fragrance. With floral notes at it's heart, a delicious raspberry praline top note and scents of Golden Cypress and Himalayan Cedar Wood, this perfume is an extravaganza of woody freshness. The creation is is spellbinding, modern and playful – much like Anna's clothes! Image: @annasui . . . #museum #fashiontextilemuseum #fashiontextile #annasui #annasuicosmetics #perfume #perfumes #museumshop #fashionexhibition #textiledesign #fashionart #designerfashion #unicorn

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