Tag: art galleries

Ten Days Six Nights @ The Tanks – Tate Modern / from 24th March until 2nd April 2017 🌝🌚

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: various

@ Tate Modern, The Tanks, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: book online (free during normal day opening hours and charge for evening performances)

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/ten-days-six-nights

Ten Inspiring Days
Brining together an intergenerational selection of artists that have been invited to stage their work as a space that extends a form of hospitality or community, to other artists and visitors alike. The artists create images of networks and forms of participation that link natural environment with social media, organic and technological, human and non-human.

Isabel Lewis is in residence throughout the duration of the exhibition hosting a number of her signature occasions, combining music, food, drink and perfume to create an alternative environment for dance, discussions and invited musicians.

CAMP, a collaborative studio founded in Mumbai in 2007, use the Transformer Galleries as a space to share a selection of rarely-seen installations from the past 15 years that rework everyday circuits of electricity.

Wu Tsang and Fred Moten present Gravitational Feel, a sculptural performance using fabric and sound to explore the social and physical significance of touch and voice. Installations by Carlos Casas, Phill Niblock, and Lorenzo Senni exist as site-specific environments open to the public by day.

Fujiko Nakaya will transform the South Terrace for the first time with an immersive fog sculpture, animated by a light and soundscape made in collaboration with Nakaya’s historic collaborators: Ryuichi Sakamoto and Shiro Takatani; and host performances by renowned dancer and choreographer Min Tanaka.

Six unmissable nights
The daytime installations act as springboards for six nights of ticketed live performances. You can browse the full programme for each night below and book tickets online. The live nights will showcase both established and emerging artists working across performance, film, sound and dance.

teamLab: Transcending Boundaries @ Pace Gallery / until 11th March 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tues-Sat 11-4

@ PACE London, 6 Burlington Gardens, London W1S 3ET

Free entry, booking essential!

www.pacegallery.com
www.pacelondon.team-lab.net

Exploring the role of digital technology in transcending the physical and conceptual boundaries that exist between different artworks, with imagery from one work breaking free of the frame and entering the space of another.

The installations also dissolve distinctions between artwork and exhibition space, and involve the viewer through interactivity.

The largest room in the exhibition will include six works and feature Universe of Water Particles, Transcending Boundaries (2017), a virtual waterfall that extends beyond the gallery wall onto the floor, flowing through the exhibition space and around the feet of the viewer. It engages with the concept of Ultra Subjective Space, central to teamLab’s practice, referencing the non-perspectival depiction of space in premodern Japanese art and situating the viewer directly within the realm of the artwork.

Encompassing the second room, Dark Waves (2016) is a simulation of the movement of waves based on the behaviour of hundreds of thousands of water particles. The waves are created in a three-dimensional virtual space, expressing water as a living entity that immerses the viewer and suggests an intrinsic connection with nature.

In the last room, the darkened space is transformed by the presence of the viewer, which activates Flowers Bloom on People (2017). With the body as a canvas for the projections, flowers are in a process of continuous change—growing, decaying and scattering in direct response to the viewer’s movements.

Natural Light – Blue Light Room by Bruce Nauman @ Blain|Southern / until 12th November 2016 🔷

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Mon-Fri 10am-6pm
Sat 10am-5pm

@ Blain|Southern, 4 Hanover Square London W1S 1BP

Free entry

www.blainsouthern.com

A significant architectural installation exhibited for the first time since its initial presentation in 1971. It is one of the earliest instances of the artist producing built environments to intentionally discomfit or disorientate the viewer.

In the gallery, there were some skylights above one wall. I installed blue fluorescent lights below the sky lights. It messed up your ability to see the space clearly because when you got under them you started getting a lot of afterimages. Everything became a little jumpy… There was nothing else in the space. So the idea was that it would be hard to know what to focus on and even if you did, it would be hard to focus.’ – Bruce Nauman

While in many ways representative of the minimalist aesthetic of the late 1960s and early 1970s, Natural Light, Blue Light Room also reveals a specific set of ideas that concerned Nauman at the time. He devised Natural Light, Blue Light Room at a time when artists were attempting to reduce to the barest minimum what was necessary for an action, object or intervention to be declared an artwork. He had already started to explore how to change the emphasis from the production of an inert art object to an installation that would create a particular physical or psychological experience for the viewer. In order to fulfil this aim, he set aside the convention of representing light, temperature or space in a sculpture or image, and instead used these phenomena as the actual raw material or media of his work.

Walking into the gallery, viewers experience a physical response to the empty space and unfamiliar light. With time, they discern two different light sources – the natural daylight and blue fluorescent lights. This initial physical stimulus grows more confusing as the atmosphere in the room changes and resets itself with the shifting light outside. Meanwhile, the blue light remains wholly consistent, becoming a strangely tangible presence in the room, thus acting like an image or symbol, almost an object in itself, inviting the viewer to interpret their own reaction to the disorientating experience of the room.

*This art installation is best experienced during daylight hours

© 2017 InFormed London

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