Tag: art galleries

Repeat After Me – Oddly Head @ Hang-Up Gallery / until 3rd September 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Mon – closed
Tue-Sun 12pm-6pm

@ Hang-Up Gallery, 81 Stoke Newington Road, London N16 8A

www.hanguppictures.com/exhibition/oddly-head-repeat-after-me

Inaugural exhibition by London-based artist Oddly Head. Celebrating the brand new collection of bold, succinct and highly topical text-based limited edition screen prints and original mixed media works. 📸

With the June election, a reality TV star in the White House, and increasing political and military tension in more countries than we can remember, Oddly Head’s new body of work shrewdly comments on society’s fragile and daunting state.

Portraying how our compulsion to create an online second self has prevented our ability to make our own decisions with catastrophic results. In his latest series, Oddly Head, the alter ego of artist Tim Fishlock, neatly sums up our worst fears for leaders who abandon politics in favour of infantile populism and who are now at liberty to indulge their appetite for both distraction and destruction.

Highlighted in his new collection of repetitive ’ME’ pieces, the artist discusses our uneasy relationship with technology and how we are being subjugated by our own invention.

“We are trading privacy and intimacy, companionship and love for a public existence and a virtual thumbs up from people we’ve never met. Keenly aware that we’re being judged on our every pronouncement and every picture we post, we have become absurdly self-absorbed. And who spends more time thinking about themselves and their place in the world than the artist…?”

Light relief comes in the form of another new work titled 99 Problems. He has cunningly cast a dropped 99 ice cream in plaster and has been decorating the streets of London with this irreverent artwork.

Summer Exhibition 2017 @ Royal Academy of Arts / until 20th August 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Mon – Thu, Sat – Sun 10am – 6pm
Fri 10am – 10pm

@ Royal Academy of Arts, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BD

Tickets: £14 book online

www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/summer-exhibition-2017

Everything you’ll see at the Summer Exhibition ☀️😎 represents the art being made today. Expect to find a panorama of art in all media, from painting, printmaking, film and photography to sculpture, architectural works and performance art.

Almost 250 years ago, the RA’s founding members agreed to hold an “Annual Exhibition of Paintings, Sculptures and Designs … open to all Artists”, to help finance the training of young artists in the Royal Academy Schools. Now, nearly 250 years later, ahead of our big anniversary in 2018, Royal Academician Eileen Cooper, explores themes of discovery and new talent from her unique position as Keeper of the Royal Academy – the Academician who is responsible for supporting and guiding the students.

Cooper takes on the mantle of coordinating the largest open submission exhibition in the world, hanging over 1,200 works by artists established and lesser-known in the space of just eight days. Don’t miss work by internationally renowned artists Rosemarie Trockel, Julian Schnabel, Hassan Hajjaj, Secundino Hernández, Isaac Julien, Tomoaki Suzuki, Mark Wallinger and Sean Scully RA, as well as submissions by new Royal Academicians including Gilbert & George and David Adjaye. Other highlights include Yinka Shonibare RA’s six metre high colourful wind sculpture in the RA Courtyard, and Farshid Moussavi RA’s unique focus on construction coordination drawings in the Architecture Gallery.

Into the Unknown: A Journey through Science Fiction @ Barbican Art Gallery / until 1st September 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 11am – 8pm (Thu and Fri until 9pm)

@ Barbican Art Gallery, Level 3, Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS

From £14.50 book online

www.barbican.org.uk/intotheunknown

The genre-defining exhibition of art, design, film and literature.

From the 19th century cabinet of curiosities, to the vastness of space. Through future cities, into the inner landscapes of human perception.

Uncover the mysterious lands of Jules Verne and Ray Harryhausen where Science Fiction narratives first took root. Venture on an odyssey into our solar system, with vintage artwork promoting Soviet visions of space alongside immersive work by Soda_Jerk. Visit a gallery of aliens, and stand alongside iconic spacesuits from a galaxy of blockbusters including Star Trek and Interstellar.

Imagine dystopian worlds with Margaret Atwood and 28 Days Later. Then, with nowhere left to explore but human consciousness, delve deep and experience the transformation and mutation of the body through the eyes of Jack Kirby and Ex Machina.

Curated by historian and writer Patrick Gyger, this festival-style exhibition consists of more than 800 works, many of which have never been seen in the UK before. Continuing across the Centre, it includes artwork from Isaac Julien, Larissa Sansour and Conrad Shawcross, and an installation from the creators of Black Mirror.

Ten Days Six Nights @ The Tanks – Tate Modern / from 24th March until 2nd April 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: various

@ Tate Modern, The Tanks, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: book online (free during normal day opening hours and charge for evening performances)

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/ten-days-six-nights

Ten Inspiring Days
Brining together an intergenerational selection of artists that have been invited to stage their work as a space that extends a form of hospitality or community, to other artists and visitors alike. The artists create images of networks and forms of participation that link natural environment with social media, organic and technological, human and non-human.

Isabel Lewis is in residence throughout the duration of the exhibition hosting a number of her signature occasions, combining music, food, drink and perfume to create an alternative environment for dance, discussions and invited musicians.

CAMP, a collaborative studio founded in Mumbai in 2007, use the Transformer Galleries as a space to share a selection of rarely-seen installations from the past 15 years that rework everyday circuits of electricity.

Wu Tsang and Fred Moten present Gravitational Feel, a sculptural performance using fabric and sound to explore the social and physical significance of touch and voice. Installations by Carlos Casas, Phill Niblock, and Lorenzo Senni exist as site-specific environments open to the public by day.

Fujiko Nakaya will transform the South Terrace for the first time with an immersive fog sculpture, animated by a light and soundscape made in collaboration with Nakaya’s historic collaborators: Ryuichi Sakamoto and Shiro Takatani; and host performances by renowned dancer and choreographer Min Tanaka.

Six unmissable nights
The daytime installations act as springboards for six nights of ticketed live performances. You can browse the full programme for each night below and book tickets online. The live nights will showcase both established and emerging artists working across performance, film, sound and dance.

teamLab: Transcending Boundaries @ Pace Gallery / until 11th March 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tues-Sat 11-4

@ PACE London, 6 Burlington Gardens, London W1S 3ET

Free entry, booking essential!

www.pacegallery.com
www.pacelondon.team-lab.net

Exploring the role of digital technology in transcending the physical and conceptual boundaries that exist between different artworks, with imagery from one work breaking free of the frame and entering the space of another.

The installations also dissolve distinctions between artwork and exhibition space, and involve the viewer through interactivity.

The largest room in the exhibition will include six works and feature Universe of Water Particles, Transcending Boundaries (2017), a virtual waterfall that extends beyond the gallery wall onto the floor, flowing through the exhibition space and around the feet of the viewer. It engages with the concept of Ultra Subjective Space, central to teamLab’s practice, referencing the non-perspectival depiction of space in premodern Japanese art and situating the viewer directly within the realm of the artwork.

Encompassing the second room, Dark Waves (2016) is a simulation of the movement of waves based on the behaviour of hundreds of thousands of water particles. The waves are created in a three-dimensional virtual space, expressing water as a living entity that immerses the viewer and suggests an intrinsic connection with nature.

In the last room, the darkened space is transformed by the presence of the viewer, which activates Flowers Bloom on People (2017). With the body as a canvas for the projections, flowers are in a process of continuous change—growing, decaying and scattering in direct response to the viewer’s movements.

Natural Light – Blue Light Room by Bruce Nauman @ Blain|Southern / until 12th November 2016 ?

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Mon-Fri 10am-6pm
Sat 10am-5pm

@ Blain|Southern, 4 Hanover Square London W1S 1BP

Free entry

www.blainsouthern.com

A significant architectural installation exhibited for the first time since its initial presentation in 1971. It is one of the earliest instances of the artist producing built environments to intentionally discomfit or disorientate the viewer.

In the gallery, there were some skylights above one wall. I installed blue fluorescent lights below the sky lights. It messed up your ability to see the space clearly because when you got under them you started getting a lot of afterimages. Everything became a little jumpy… There was nothing else in the space. So the idea was that it would be hard to know what to focus on and even if you did, it would be hard to focus.’ – Bruce Nauman

While in many ways representative of the minimalist aesthetic of the late 1960s and early 1970s, Natural Light, Blue Light Room also reveals a specific set of ideas that concerned Nauman at the time. He devised Natural Light, Blue Light Room at a time when artists were attempting to reduce to the barest minimum what was necessary for an action, object or intervention to be declared an artwork. He had already started to explore how to change the emphasis from the production of an inert art object to an installation that would create a particular physical or psychological experience for the viewer. In order to fulfil this aim, he set aside the convention of representing light, temperature or space in a sculpture or image, and instead used these phenomena as the actual raw material or media of his work.

Walking into the gallery, viewers experience a physical response to the empty space and unfamiliar light. With time, they discern two different light sources – the natural daylight and blue fluorescent lights. This initial physical stimulus grows more confusing as the atmosphere in the room changes and resets itself with the shifting light outside. Meanwhile, the blue light remains wholly consistent, becoming a strangely tangible presence in the room, thus acting like an image or symbol, almost an object in itself, inviting the viewer to interpret their own reaction to the disorientating experience of the room.

*This art installation is best experienced during daylight hours

© 2017 InFormed London

We specialise in good times Back up to the top ↑