Tag: art galleries (page 1 of 2)

Mark Dion: Theatre of the Natural World at Whitechapel Gallery until 13 May 2018

Explorer, collector, activist and conjuror of theatrical environments American artist Mark Dion (b.1961) has travelled through rainforests and rubbish dumps to reveal the wonder and fragility of life on earth. Dion uses specimens – natural and manmade – to make uncanny representations of these environments. His drawings, sculptures and installations draw on the techniques of scientific enquiry and museum display; and on the telling of natural histories. 🌎

We embark on a journey through a sequence of installations created between 2000 and the present. The exhibition begins with The Library for the Birds of London (2018), a new commission continuing a series of aviaries Dion has created since 1993. The roomy sanctuary is a temporary home to 22 zebra finches, which are well-known for being social creatures. Visitors are invited into the aviary, which has an apple tree at its centre, referencing the tree of life. Over 600 books devoted to ornithology, environmentalism, literature and the natural sciences surround the birds. A scholar’s study invites us to unravel intricate drawings and models; while the Bureau for the Centre of the Study for Surrealism and its Legacy displays the strange magic of obsolete things. The muddy banks of the Thames have also yielded their treasures for poetic display in a gigantic cabinet; while The Wonder Workshop displays the ghosts of animals and instruments, many of them extinct and obsolescent. Each immersive environment is also a habitat, evoking the characters that observe, conserve or exploit the natural world.


Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High Street, London E1 7QX

Monday closed
Tuesday 11am-6pm
Wednesday 11am-6pm
Thursday 11am-9pm
Friday 11am-6pm
Saturday 11am-6pm
Sunday 11am-6pm

£12.95 book online

Eddie Peake: Concrete Pitch at White Cube Bermondsey until 8 April 2018

Featuring new sculpture, painting, sound work and performance presented in an immersive and constructed environment. 🔊 🏙

The works weave autobiographical elements and an examination of self-identity with more general themes of desire, the body, architecture and urban landscape. The title ‘Concrete Pitch’ was inspired by the bare, concrete recreation ground in Finsbury Park in London where Peake grew up, which was used as a playground, a sports field, a meeting place for people of every age, class and ethnicity and location for encounters and scenarios of all kinds. Peake has said: ‘I used to treat things I did like graffiti and football and dance classes as not part of my art, then I had a sort of epiphany. I realised I want all those parts of my life in my art, and vice versa.’ For Peake, whose work can be located within a history of painting and object-making as well as more recent narratives of dance and performance art, the gallery can also be considered a stage; a place to orchestrate dramas of the everyday and to present the rich associative portrait of his childhood neighbourhood as a microcosm of urban, multicultural society.

Peake will be present in the gallery space throughout the exhibition, following a scheduled daily routine. Moving between various constructed spaces which include a private office and a triangular cell-like structure, accessible only by a tall ladder. The artist ‘plays’ himself, both offering up and dismantling the narrative of artistic ego, fictional protagonist and ‘real’ self. In another specially constructed room, visible behind a window, DJs from Kool London broadcast an online radio show during the exhibition. Broadcasting oldskool jungle and drum and bass from East London tower blocks since 1991, Kool FM is one of the longest running underground stations and provided the soundtrack to Peake’s adolescence.

The new, large-scale sound installation, Stroud Green Road runs through the gallery, consisting of a row of steel tables placed in a snaking line, just as the street of the same name runs through Peake’s neighbourhood. On their tray-like surfaces is an array of objects: small-scale sculptures as well as an eclectic selection of items purchased from shops on Stroud Green Road and several small speakers which emit a low, deep register like a wavering vibration or rattle. Composed by the artist using distorted samples and field recordings from the local area, this abstract soundscape creates a continuously looping hum, while a soft pink light floods the exhibition space. Continuing the theme of revealing and concealing, an airy white curtain hangs full-length from the ceiling, creating a natural spiralling passageway, in the centre of which a split-screen projection shows four dancers, each locked in an individual, looping sequence of complex, choreographed movement. The notion of the loop, a key motif within Peake’s work, is manifested in these repetitive movements, in the daily rituals the artist will be observing, in the sonic structure of the sound sculpture and in the music played by the Kool DJs. For Peake, these devices echo the entrapping loops of thought or behaviour associated with compulsion, obsession and depression.

In several new series of paintings, techniques of layering and masking are used to create vivid abstract compositions on canvas or hard, reflective stainless-steel panels. In one group, overlapping, spray-painted rectangles recall the urban patchwork of fly-posters, while in others, graffiti-like mark-making recedes into a bright void. This exploration of the void, whereby elements of the composition are left blank or undone creates works that reflect back to the viewer a sense ennui, even depression. In another group of oil on canvas works, a rainbow-coloured text defines the form of a head in profile spelling out the enigmatic slogans ‘A More Uncomfortable And Realistic History’, and ‘We To The Ramp Go For Relinquish Unearned Privileges And Powers’. Suggesting the direct, angry tone of graffiti, social media and urban music, these works are an expression of ideas that have formerly been implicit in Peake’s work.


White Cube Bermondsey, 144 – 152 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ

Tuesday – Saturday 10am – 6pm
Sunday 12pm – 6pm

Free entry

Red Star Over Russia: A revolution in visual culture 1905-55 at Tate Modern until 18 February 2018

A dramatic visual history of Russia and the Soviet Union from 1905 to the death of Stalin – seen through the eyes of artists, designers and photographers. 🇷🇺

2017 marks the centenary of the October Revolution. Rebellion brought hope, chaos, heroism and tragedy as the Russian Empire became the Soviet Union, endured revolutions, civil war, famine, dictatorship and Nazi invasion. A new visual culture arose and transformed the fabric of everyday life.

The core of this exhibition comes from the extraordinary collection of photographer and graphic designer David King (1943–2016). He started his collection of over 250,000 items relating to this period while working for The Sunday Times Magazine in the 1970s. The collection was acquired by Tate in 2016.

This show is an opportunity to see the rare propaganda posters, prints and photographs collected by King – some bearing traces of state censorship. Including work by El Lissitzky, Gustav Klutsis, Dmitri Moor, Aleksandr Deineka, Nina Vatolina and Yevgeny Khaldei, it is a thrilling journey through a momentous period in world history.


Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Sunday – Thursday 10am – 6pm
Friday – Saturday 10am – 10pm

£11.30 book online

The Come Up by Charles Jeffrey at NOW Gallery until 11 February 2018

Charles Jeffrey, the Glaswegian designer, illustrator and creative, is NOW Gallery’s third fashion commission. Charles’ first solo exhibition, THE COME UP will be an interactive and three-dimensional representation of the Charles Jeffrey LOVERBOY brand and cult club night.

Based around Charles’ renowned illustrations, THE COME UP will explore these artworks amplified via new media. Showcased in a three-dimensional format, the exhibition will act as a manifestation of Charles’ mind. Charles’ emotive and vibrant illustrations will be interpreted afresh through large sculptural pieces that will hang from the gallery’s seven-meter ceiling. The sculptures will be a mix of PVC, fibreglass, chicken wire with papier-mache, and electrical tape, varying greatly in size.

As part of the installation, a series of shelves filled with mixed media artistic materials will be the setting of an interactive experience that will invite visitors to open up their alter egos and let creativity take over. Starting with a representation from Charles himself, the installation provides an opportunity for the visiting community to progress the structural artwork until it is complete. This relates back to a signature part of Charles’ illustrative work – repeated faces – as at the end, the installation will become a physical representation and exploration of the realm of identities and many faces who have been welcomed into the gallery to interact with THE COME UP, much like those who attend a LOVERBOY club night.


NOW Gallery, The Gateway Pavilions, Peninsula Square, Greenwich Peninsula, London SE10 0SQ

Mon – Fri 10am – 7pm
Sat – Sun 11am – 4pm

Free entry

Zhongguo 2185 curated by Victor Wang 王宗孚 at Sadie Coles until 4 November 2017

Zhongguo 2185 (China 2185) is an exhibition of ten young artists from China, whose works address the shifting cultural contexts of China – past, present, and future – while also moving far beyond those social and geographical confines. 🇨🇳

The exhibition draws its title from Liu Cixin’s 1989 ‘critical utopian’ Science Fiction novel, ‘Zhongguo 2185’, which was written during the rapid socio-political reforms of the 1980s, and remains unpublished to this day – circulating only on the internet. The exhibition harnesses the ‘critical openness’ that early Chinese Science Fiction utilised and advocated in the face of authoritarian rule. It gestures towards potential futures while also constructing a critical vision of the past and present.

Curated by Victor Wang 王宗孚, Zhongguo 2185 examines a new lexicon of Chinese contemporary art – presenting a cross- section of work that complicates and disrupts the premise of a unified visual form and national aesthetic that has often been attached to Chinese ‘contemporaneity’. Bringing together new, existing and site-specific commissions and artworks, this exhibition – comprised solely of artists born after the Cultural Revolution of 1966-76 – uses the literary mode of Science Fiction (often deployed as a guise for political and personal concerns) as an entry point for exploring the frameworks that underpin contemporary art in China, and its current accelerated production.

Lu Yang, Power of Will, 2016 in our group show Zhongguo 2185 curated by Victor Wang #luyang #zhongguo @viktorwang @societeberlin

A post shared by Sadie Coles HQ 赛迪HQ画廊 (@sadiecoleshq) on


Tuesday – Saturday 11 – 6pm

Sadie Coles, 62 Kingly Street, London W1B 5QN


Marilyn, Flowers, Lips, Gun, Mirror, Cactus at Ordovas until 16 December 2017

Pop is a movement that has been explored and celebrated in many ways; Marilyn, Flowers, Lips, Gun, Mirror, Cactus approaches the concept from a new perspective – that of an immersive experience with a design element, to transform the way visitors interact with the gallery space and works on display.

Paintings by Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol and Tom Wesselmann are shown for the first time in the UK among a limited edition of Gufram’s iconic Cactus, specially commissioned for Ordovas.


Tue-Fri 10:00-18:00
Sat 11:00-15:00

Ordovas, 25 Savile Row, London W1S 2ER


Repeat After Me – Oddly Head @ Hang-Up Gallery / until 3rd September 2017


Mon – closed
Tue-Sun 12pm-6pm

@ Hang-Up Gallery, 81 Stoke Newington Road, London N16 8A


Inaugural exhibition by London-based artist Oddly Head. Celebrating the brand new collection of bold, succinct and highly topical text-based limited edition screen prints and original mixed media works. 📸

With the June election, a reality TV star in the White House, and increasing political and military tension in more countries than we can remember, Oddly Head’s new body of work shrewdly comments on society’s fragile and daunting state.

Portraying how our compulsion to create an online second self has prevented our ability to make our own decisions with catastrophic results. In his latest series, Oddly Head, the alter ego of artist Tim Fishlock, neatly sums up our worst fears for leaders who abandon politics in favour of infantile populism and who are now at liberty to indulge their appetite for both distraction and destruction.

Highlighted in his new collection of repetitive ’ME’ pieces, the artist discusses our uneasy relationship with technology and how we are being subjugated by our own invention.

“We are trading privacy and intimacy, companionship and love for a public existence and a virtual thumbs up from people we’ve never met. Keenly aware that we’re being judged on our every pronouncement and every picture we post, we have become absurdly self-absorbed. And who spends more time thinking about themselves and their place in the world than the artist…?”

Light relief comes in the form of another new work titled 99 Problems. He has cunningly cast a dropped 99 ice cream in plaster and has been decorating the streets of London with this irreverent artwork.

Summer Exhibition 2017 @ Royal Academy of Arts / until 20th August 2017


Mon – Thu, Sat – Sun 10am – 6pm
Fri 10am – 10pm

@ Royal Academy of Arts, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BD

Tickets: £14 book online


Everything you’ll see at the Summer Exhibition ☀️😎 represents the art being made today. Expect to find a panorama of art in all media, from painting, printmaking, film and photography to sculpture, architectural works and performance art.

Almost 250 years ago, the RA’s founding members agreed to hold an “Annual Exhibition of Paintings, Sculptures and Designs … open to all Artists”, to help finance the training of young artists in the Royal Academy Schools. Now, nearly 250 years later, ahead of our big anniversary in 2018, Royal Academician Eileen Cooper, explores themes of discovery and new talent from her unique position as Keeper of the Royal Academy – the Academician who is responsible for supporting and guiding the students.

Cooper takes on the mantle of coordinating the largest open submission exhibition in the world, hanging over 1,200 works by artists established and lesser-known in the space of just eight days. Don’t miss work by internationally renowned artists Rosemarie Trockel, Julian Schnabel, Hassan Hajjaj, Secundino Hernández, Isaac Julien, Tomoaki Suzuki, Mark Wallinger and Sean Scully RA, as well as submissions by new Royal Academicians including Gilbert & George and David Adjaye. Other highlights include Yinka Shonibare RA’s six metre high colourful wind sculpture in the RA Courtyard, and Farshid Moussavi RA’s unique focus on construction coordination drawings in the Architecture Gallery.

Into the Unknown: A Journey through Science Fiction @ Barbican Art Gallery / until 1st September 2017


Doors: 11am – 8pm (Thu and Fri until 9pm)

@ Barbican Art Gallery, Level 3, Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS

From £14.50 book online


The genre-defining exhibition of art, design, film and literature.

From the 19th century cabinet of curiosities, to the vastness of space. Through future cities, into the inner landscapes of human perception.

Uncover the mysterious lands of Jules Verne and Ray Harryhausen where Science Fiction narratives first took root. Venture on an odyssey into our solar system, with vintage artwork promoting Soviet visions of space alongside immersive work by Soda_Jerk. Visit a gallery of aliens, and stand alongside iconic spacesuits from a galaxy of blockbusters including Star Trek and Interstellar.

Imagine dystopian worlds with Margaret Atwood and 28 Days Later. Then, with nowhere left to explore but human consciousness, delve deep and experience the transformation and mutation of the body through the eyes of Jack Kirby and Ex Machina.

Curated by historian and writer Patrick Gyger, this festival-style exhibition consists of more than 800 works, many of which have never been seen in the UK before. Continuing across the Centre, it includes artwork from Isaac Julien, Larissa Sansour and Conrad Shawcross, and an installation from the creators of Black Mirror.

Ten Days Six Nights @ The Tanks – Tate Modern / from 24th March until 2nd April 2017


Doors: various

@ Tate Modern, The Tanks, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: book online (free during normal day opening hours and charge for evening performances)


Ten Inspiring Days
Brining together an intergenerational selection of artists that have been invited to stage their work as a space that extends a form of hospitality or community, to other artists and visitors alike. The artists create images of networks and forms of participation that link natural environment with social media, organic and technological, human and non-human.

Isabel Lewis is in residence throughout the duration of the exhibition hosting a number of her signature occasions, combining music, food, drink and perfume to create an alternative environment for dance, discussions and invited musicians.

CAMP, a collaborative studio founded in Mumbai in 2007, use the Transformer Galleries as a space to share a selection of rarely-seen installations from the past 15 years that rework everyday circuits of electricity.

Wu Tsang and Fred Moten present Gravitational Feel, a sculptural performance using fabric and sound to explore the social and physical significance of touch and voice. Installations by Carlos Casas, Phill Niblock, and Lorenzo Senni exist as site-specific environments open to the public by day.

Fujiko Nakaya will transform the South Terrace for the first time with an immersive fog sculpture, animated by a light and soundscape made in collaboration with Nakaya’s historic collaborators: Ryuichi Sakamoto and Shiro Takatani; and host performances by renowned dancer and choreographer Min Tanaka.

Six unmissable nights
The daytime installations act as springboards for six nights of ticketed live performances. You can browse the full programme for each night below and book tickets online. The live nights will showcase both established and emerging artists working across performance, film, sound and dance.

Older posts

© 2018 InFormed London

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑