Tag: art gallery (page 1 of 4)

Rachel Howard: Repetition is Truth – Via Dolorosa at Newport Street Gallery until 28 May 2018

Religion, repetition, mortality and violence – particularly controlled violence – are enduring themes in Howard’s work. These fourteen, large-scale paintings are accompanied by a small 2005 study of Ali Shallal al-Qaisi, the Iraqi detainee who was photographed being subjected to torture at the hands of American soldiers in Abu Ghraib prison in 2003. When these now-infamous images of Ali Shallal al-Qaisi – hooded and standing on a box in a cruciform position – were released in 2004, Howard took particular note of the box. She explains: ‘The box is almost like a plinth – I was thinking about the cross, the Crucifixion, and how it related to this box as a twenty-first century place of horror, humiliation and human rights atrocities, and I couldn’t help but connect the two.’ As one moves between the Stations, the box variously emerges, or appears almost submerged in the paint, before eventually vanishing. 🖼

In order to create these semi-abstract paintings the artist applied vast swathes of household gloss paint to the canvas. Howard allowed the pigment and varnish to separate in the paint can and then allowed gravity to influence the direction of the medium in its two forms, building layer upon layer of poured paint. The form of each painting was thus determined by a combination of the weight and viscosity of the paint, precision and chance.


Tue - Sun 10am - 6pm

Newport Street Gallery, Newport Street, London SE11 6AJ

Free entry

Harmonics in Space: Fred Butler at NOW Gallery until 29 April 2018

Welcome to Fred Butler’s therapeutic world. For NOW Gallery’s Design Commission Fred has created a joyful destination for healing with light, colour, shape and sound. In this environment she explores chromotherapy and light as an antidote to SAD – seasonal defective disorder – and to our urban living. 🌈 ✨ 🌈

Fred’s on-going interest in wellbeing led her to discover Rudolph Laban’s theory ‘Harmonics in Space’ of how our bodies are formed of polyhedral shapes within the environment. The first and smallest of the polyhedral is the tetrahedron, located at the centre. Vibrations here are closely related to breathing and our intense awareness of being alive. Fred believes that through constant computer work and hunching over devices, this tetrahedron gets blocked. Take this opportunity to stand, breath and expand your chests to recharge the whole body to be responsive.

“We need a balance of all the colour vibrations in sunlight to nourish us energetically”. As with shape Fred believes that colour has a profound affect on our moods, emotions and daily life. This immersive installation will give you the opportunity to step away from the grey of everyday into the full spectrum.

Dip your head into a polyhedral to encounter healing light. These shapes relate in concentric order, and form harmonic structures in the gallery. This environment offers an interplay between the conscious and unconscious levels of the psyche, stimulating the imagination and releasing creativity.

Take time to make origami. We have an exclusive colourful mystic mascot to match your mood. Give yourself creative space to switch off, contemplate and make. Decorate your cosmic creature and keep as a magic memento of your day.

Headphones are available to experience a sonic journey by Natureboy created for the exhibition. He combines live instrumentation, synthesizers and his own voice in a series of rich, reflective and detailed compositions. The contrasting tempos, textures and moods reflect the many facets of Fred Butler’s exploration of the senses. “Music Heals”

This exhibition is about looking after you. It’s inclusiveness addresses Fred’s concern about the future of human nature becoming introverted, isolated and immobile. Let go of instant gratification from constant scrolling and over stimulation which shortens attention span. Enjoy the moment, forget the past, don’t speculate the future be in the NOW.


NOW Gallery, The Gateway Pavilions, Peninsula Square, Greenwich Peninsula, London SE10 0SQ

Mon – Fri 10am – 7pm
Sat – Sun 11am – 4pm

Free entry

Andreas Gursky at Hayward Gallery until 22 April 2018

Hayward Gallery reopens with the first major UK retrospective of the work of acclaimed German photographer Andreas Gursky. Known for his large-scale, often spectacular pictures that portray emblematic sites and scenes of the global economy and contemporary life, he is widely regarded as one of the most significant photographers of our time. 📷

Driven by an interest and insight into ‘the way that the world is constituted’, as well as what he describes as ‘the pure joy of seeing’, Gursky makes photographs that are not just depictions of places or situations, but reflections on the nature of image-making and the limits of human perception. Often taken from a high vantage point, these images make use of a ‘democratic’ perspective that gives equal importance to all elements of his highly detailed scenes.


Hayward Gallery Southbank Centre, Belvedere Road, London SE1 8XX

11am – 7pm
Closed Tuesdays
Thursdays until 9pm

£16 book online

Basquiat: Boom for Real at Barbican Art Gallery until 28 January 2018

Basquiat shocked with enigmatic paintings focused on subjects as disparate as graffiti, jazz, classicism, his Caribbean heritage and contemporary racial politics. A self-taught artist and former graffitist his rise to fame was meteoritic. The face of underground culture, he performed in the film New York Beat alongside Debbie Harry, collaborated with Andy Warhol, produced murals and installations for hip nightclubs and embarked on a brief romance with Madonna (rumour has it he introduced the fledgling pop star to gallerist Larry Gagosian and foretold her stardom).

Although he is best known for his frenetic canvases, Basquiat also experimented with textiles, music, poetry, photography, film and even drawing in his own blood. In his tragically short life he produced an astounding amount of work that remarkably still remains unrepresented in any UK collection.

The exhibition seeks to affirm his significance as one of the greatest painters of the 20th century, while also exploring his position as a key figure of popular culture during this period. The show includes important paintings, film clips and his lesser-known drawings.

Barbican Art Gallery, Level 3, Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS

Thu – Sat 10am – 10pm
Sun – Wed 10am – 6pm

£16 book online

Dreamers Awake @ White Cube Bermondsey / 17th September 2017


Tuesday-Saturday 10am-6pm
Sunday 12pm-6pm

@ White Cube Bermondsey, 144 – 152 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ

Free entry


A group show at White Cube Bermondsey which explores the enduring influence of Surrealism through the work of more than fifty women artists. The exhibition brings together sculpture, painting, collage, photography and drawing from the 1930s to the present day and includes work by well-known Surrealist figures as well as contemporary and emerging artists. 🚺

Woman has a powerful presence in Surrealism. She is the object of masculine desire and fantasy; a harpy, goddess or sphinx; a mystery or threat. Often, she appears decapitated, distorted, trussed up. Fearsome or fetishized, she is always the ‘other’. From today’s perspective, gender politics can seem the unlikely blind spot of a movement that declared war on patriarchal society, convention and conformity.

Nonetheless, from its earliest days female artists have been drawn to Surrealism’s emphasis on personal and artistic freedoms and to the creative potential that the exploration of the unconscious offered. By focusing on the work of women artists, ‘Dreamers Awake’ hopes to show how, through art foregrounding bodily experience, the symbolic woman of Surrealism is refigured as a creative, sentient, thinking being.

Repossessed by its owner, the fragmented, headless body of Surrealism becomes a vehicle for irony, resistance, humour and self-expression. Ranging beyond those who might identify themselves as Surrealists, the show traces the influence of the movement where artists delve into the unconscious; create alternative realities; invent fetishistic objects, such as Mona Hatoum’s Jardin Public (1993), that subvert the objectification of the female form, or, in the spirit of Claude Cahun’s iconic black and white self-portraits from the 1930s, play with gender identity as a fluid construct.

The exhibition features works by women associated with the Surrealist movement – including Eileen Agar, Leonora Carrington, Lee Miller, Dorothea Tanning and Leonor Fini – who until recently, were often characterised simply as muses, models or mistresses. Works by Francesca Woodman, Hannah Wilke, Louise Bourgeois, Rosemarie Trockel, Kiki Smith, Paloma Varga Weisz, Mona Hatoum, Tracey Emin and Sarah Lucas, among others, testify to the far-reaching influence of Surrealism through the intervening decades. Surrealism meets punk in the work of Linder, and infuses the separate cultural heritages of Iraqi artist Hayv Kahraman and Japanese painter Tomoko Kashiki.

Today, one hundred years since Apollinaire coined the term ‘surrealisme’, the unconscious mind is familiar territory, and the word ‘surreal’ itself debased to the point of meaninglessness. But in a world preoccupied with the politics of identity, in which the advances of previous generations must be continually defended, we see the continued – even renewed – relevance of surrealist ideas and strategies to a generation of emerging artists, including Sascha Braunig, Jordan Kasey, Loie Hollowell, Kelly Akashi, and Caitlin Keogh.

Into the Unknown: A Journey through Science Fiction @ Barbican Art Gallery / until 1st September 2017


Doors: 11am – 8pm (Thu and Fri until 9pm)

@ Barbican Art Gallery, Level 3, Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS

From £14.50 book online


The genre-defining exhibition of art, design, film and literature.

From the 19th century cabinet of curiosities, to the vastness of space. Through future cities, into the inner landscapes of human perception.

Uncover the mysterious lands of Jules Verne and Ray Harryhausen where Science Fiction narratives first took root. Venture on an odyssey into our solar system, with vintage artwork promoting Soviet visions of space alongside immersive work by Soda_Jerk. Visit a gallery of aliens, and stand alongside iconic spacesuits from a galaxy of blockbusters including Star Trek and Interstellar.

Imagine dystopian worlds with Margaret Atwood and 28 Days Later. Then, with nowhere left to explore but human consciousness, delve deep and experience the transformation and mutation of the body through the eyes of Jack Kirby and Ex Machina.

Curated by historian and writer Patrick Gyger, this festival-style exhibition consists of more than 800 works, many of which have never been seen in the UK before. Continuing across the Centre, it includes artwork from Isaac Julien, Larissa Sansour and Conrad Shawcross, and an installation from the creators of Black Mirror.

Maggi Hambling: Touch @ British Museum / until 29th January 2017


Doors: 10am-5.30pm

@ British Museum, Great Russell Street, London WC1B 3DG

Free entry


This exhibition presents an important survey of works on paper that traces Maggi Hambling’s engagement with drawing throughout her career. It includes work from the British Museum’s collection, loans from the National Portrait Gallery and Tate, and rarely seen work from private collections and the artist’s studio.

One of Britain’s foremost contemporary artists, Hambling is perhaps best known for her compelling portraits, paintings of the sea, and her celebrated and controversial public sculpture, including A Conversation with Oscar Wilde (1998) and Scallop (2003). Less familiar, but equally significant, are her dynamic and sensuous works on paper. Forging an immediate and powerful connection with the subject being drawn, the concept of ‘touch’ pervades these works, distilling the themes of life and death that underscore her art. This exhibition presents over 40 works on paper, many of which are on show for the first time.

‘I believe the subject chooses the artist, not vice versa, and that subject must then be in charge during the act of drawing in order for the truth to be found. Eye and hand attempt to discover and produce those precise marks which recreate what the heart feels. The challenge is to touch the subject, with all the desire of a lover.’

Maggi Hambling

Bojan Šarčević invagination @ Modern Art / until 14th January 2017


Doors: Tue-Sat 11am-6pm

@ Modern Art, 4-8 Helmet Row, London EC1V 3QJ

Free entry


Third solo exhibition with Modern Art. Šarčević’s work was the subject of survey exhibitions at Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein, Vaduz, Liechtenstein, and Institut d’Art Contemporain, Villeurbanne, France (2012).

Bojan Šarčević was born in Belgrade in 1974. He studied at L’Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris, France, graduating in 1997, and undertook postgraduate study at Rijksakademie, Amsterdam, Netherlands, from 1999 to 2000. He lives and works in Berlin and Paris.

Zaha Hadid @ Serpentine Sackler Gallery / until 12th February 2017


Doors: 10am–6pm

@ Serpentine Sackler Gallery, West Carriage Drive, London W2 2UH

Free entry


On the occasion of the exhibition Zaha Hadid: Early Paintings and Drawings a series of experimental virtual reality experiences have been specially developed with Zaha Hadid Architects in partnership with Google Arts & Culture.

This installation offers a dynamic and immersive insight into the workings of Hadid’s paintings and will be available to view in the gallery throughout the exhibition.

Charles Richardson: HEADBONE @ Zabludowicz Collection / until 8th November 2015


Doors: Thursday–Sunday 12–6pm

@ Zabludowicz Collection, 176 Prince of Wales Road, London NW5 3PT

Free entry


Exploring themes of male identity and uncertainty. Through the symbolic use of bodies, objects and gestures he navigates the idiosyncrasies that permeate the ‘lifestyles’ of today. Employing images of the absurd Richardson’s approach disarms through dark humour and the staging of infantile wonder.

The exhibition HEADBONE features a new single-channel video has as its central component, extending both the technical ambition and emotional complexity of his practice. Using digital photography Richardson creates 3D models of his own body, and the bodies of others, which are then animated with movement and sound. Bound in everyday detritus the figures appear frozen and mute, yet full of psychological resonance. The video is presented alongside sculptural objects linked to its production, and displayed in an installation constructed from foil-covered board that requires viewers to weave a route through to a final ‘chamber’.

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