Tag: Art in London (page 1 of 3)

Clean Air Gallery @ Windrush Square / until Wednesday 29th March 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

From: 7am-8pm

@ Windrush Square, London, Brixton

www.air-ink.com
www.tigerbeer.com

Tiger Beer has launched the world’s first Clean Air Gallery in Brixton, featuring art made from air pollution. Each piece of art is made using Air-Ink, an innovative technology that turns air pollution into ink.

Tiger has been challenging convention since 1932 when they innovated and pioneered tropical lagering to create a refreshing and full-bodied brew to overcome the heat. Today, Tiger is supporting bold ideas and people who are bringing about change. As air pollution continues to plague cities globally, Tiger Beer is bringing artists from major cities around the UK and Anirudh Sharma together to produce purposeful creativity from the streets for the streets and to inspire everyone to uncage their inner tiger!

The gallery features art made from Air-Ink by artists from the top 5 polluted cities in the UK (London, Glasgow, Leeds, Southampton and Nottingham). Each artist has been presented with a blank canvas which will be used to represent something they find beautiful in their cities, created using Air-Ink. Artists who will be showing work at the gallery include Mr Doodle, Roderick Mills, Jonny Hannah, Josh Parkin and Goodwives and Warriors.

Next to The Clean Air Gallery there will be an area for passers-by to try out Air-Ink for themselves and add to a large piece of work started by Mr Doodle himself!

Richard Serra @ Gagosian / until 13th April 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue–Sat 10am-6pm

@ Gagosian, 6-24 Britannia Street, London WC1X 9JD

Free entry

www.gagosian.com/exhibitions/

Exhibition featuring large-scale steel sculptures by Richard Serra.

From San Francisco, born in 1938 and lived in New York since 1966. He studied at the University of California (Berkeley and Santa Barbara) and at Yale University. He was awarded the insignia of Chevalier de la légion d’honneur by the French government in June 2015.

Since 1983, Gagosian has presented more than thirty major exhibitions of Serra’s sculptures and drawings in the United States and Europe.

The Radical Eye: Modernist Photography from the Sir Elton John Collection @ Tate Modern / until 21st May 2017 📷

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Monday to Sunday 10.00–18.00
Friday to Saturday 10.00–22.00

@ Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: £15 book online

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/radical-eye-modernist-photography-sir-elton-john-collection

This is a once-in-a-lifetime chance to see one of the world’s greatest private collections of photography, drawn from the classic modernist period of the 1920s–50s. An incredible group of Man Ray portraits are exhibited together for the first time, having been brought together by Sir Elton John over the past twenty-five years, including portraits of Matisse, Picasso, and Breton.

With over 70 artists and nearly 150 rare vintage prints on show from seminal figures including Brassai, Imogen Cunningham, André Kertész, Dorothea Lange, Tina Modotti, and Aleksandr Rodchenko, this is a chance to take a peek inside Elton John’s home and delight in seeing such masterpieces of photography.

Jo Brocklehurst: Nobodies and Somebodies @ House of Illustration / until 14th May 2017 ✏️

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Sun, 10am-6pm

@ 2 Granary Square, King’s Cross, N1C 4BH

Tickets: £7.50 book online

www.houseofillustration.org.uk/whats-on/current-future-events/jo-brocklehurst-nobodies-and-somebodies

Drawing live in fetish clubs, punk squats and on the performance scene of 1970-90s London, Berlin and New York, Jo Brocklehurst’s artwork is a unique record of subculture.

Her figurative paintings from fetish clubs document experiments with sex, androgyny and couture that later inspired the mainstream fashion collections of Jean Paul Gaultier, while her best-known portraits from the 1980s offer a raw, beautiful and female perspective on punk.

Co-curated by her model and muse Isabelle Bricknall, the exhibition also features her drawings of Berlin’s 1990s performing arts scene for the Berliner Zeitung newspaper, alongside clubland-inspired interpretations of Alice Through the Looking Glass.

Ten Days Six Nights @ The Tanks – Tate Modern / from 24th March until 2nd April 2017 🌝🌚

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: various

@ Tate Modern, The Tanks, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: book online (free during normal day opening hours and charge for evening performances)

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/ten-days-six-nights

Ten Inspiring Days
Brining together an intergenerational selection of artists that have been invited to stage their work as a space that extends a form of hospitality or community, to other artists and visitors alike. The artists create images of networks and forms of participation that link natural environment with social media, organic and technological, human and non-human.

Isabel Lewis is in residence throughout the duration of the exhibition hosting a number of her signature occasions, combining music, food, drink and perfume to create an alternative environment for dance, discussions and invited musicians.

CAMP, a collaborative studio founded in Mumbai in 2007, use the Transformer Galleries as a space to share a selection of rarely-seen installations from the past 15 years that rework everyday circuits of electricity.

Wu Tsang and Fred Moten present Gravitational Feel, a sculptural performance using fabric and sound to explore the social and physical significance of touch and voice. Installations by Carlos Casas, Phill Niblock, and Lorenzo Senni exist as site-specific environments open to the public by day.

Fujiko Nakaya will transform the South Terrace for the first time with an immersive fog sculpture, animated by a light and soundscape made in collaboration with Nakaya’s historic collaborators: Ryuichi Sakamoto and Shiro Takatani; and host performances by renowned dancer and choreographer Min Tanaka.

Six unmissable nights
The daytime installations act as springboards for six nights of ticketed live performances. You can browse the full programme for each night below and book tickets online. The live nights will showcase both established and emerging artists working across performance, film, sound and dance.

Richard Mosse: Incoming @ Barbican – The Curve / until 23rd April 2017 📷

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
The Curve
Sat–Wed 11am–8pm
Thu–Fri 11am–9pm

@ Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS

Free entry

www.barbican.org.uk

Barbican Art Gallery has invited conceptual documentary photographer and Deutsche Börse Photography Prize winner Richard Mosse to create an immersive multi-channel video installation in the Curve. In collaboration with composer Ben Frost and cinematographer Trevor Tweeten, Mosse has been working with an advanced new thermographic weapons and border imaging technology that can see beyond 30km, registering a heat signature of relative temperature difference. Classed as part of advanced weapons systems under International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), Mosse has been using this export controlled camera against its intended purpose, to create an artwork about the refugee crisis unfolding in the Aegean Sea, off the coast of Libya, in Syria, the Sahara, the Persian Gulf, and other locations.

Mosse is renowned for work that challenges documentary photography. In his recent work The Enclave (2013) – a six-channel installation commissioned by the Irish Pavilion for the 2013 Venice Biennale – Mosse employed a now discontinued 16mm colour infrared film called Kodak Aerochrome that transformed the green landscape of the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo into vivid hues of pink to create a surreal dreamscape. Questioning the ways in which war photography is constructed, Mosse’s representation of the ongoing armed conflict in eastern Congo advocates a new way of looking.

Good Day art exhibition @ Stour Space / until Friday 3rd February 2017 🤛🏽

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 9am-5pm daily

@ Stour Space, 7 Roach Road, Tower Hamlets, London E3 2PA

Free entry

www.stourspace.co.uk/portfolio/good-day-january-2017

January 20th 2017 is the day that President-elect Trump takes office. Unbeknownst to many, January 20th also happens to be the day Ice Cube rapped about in his seminal song It Was A Good Day.

A group of artists are celebrating Ice Cube and his positive song with an exhibition dedicated to It Was A Good Day.

It Was A Good Day by Ice Cube was released in 1992, and using the song’s lyrics and historic events—like the debut date of Yo! MTV Raps and results of games between the Lakers and Sonics—Donovan Strain from Murk Avenue concluded that Ice Cube’s “good day” was Jan. 20, 1992.

Artwork by:
Gary Alford
Uslan Cevet
Daniel Cree
Josh Earle
Andrew Goss
Anna Hanlon
Darren John
Dan Jose
Jane Kenny
Chris Mackenzie-Gray
Alan Merrick
Kyle Nielsen
Claudine O’Sullivan
Silvia Ospina
Patrick Schmidt
Donovan Strain
Coby Walsh

Anselm Kiefer: Walhalla @ White Cube / until 12th February 2017 ⬜️

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Tuesday-Saturday 10am-6pm
Sunday 12pm-6pm

@ White Cube, Bermondsey, 144 – 152 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ

Free entry

www.whitecube.com

A new large-scale installation, sculpture and painting referring to the mythical place in Norse mythology, a paradise for those slain in battle, as well as to the Walhalla neo-classical monument, built by Ludwig I King of Bavaria in 1842 to honour heroic figures in German history.

Throughout his career, Kiefer has interwoven themes of history, politics and landscape into his work, revisiting imagery and symbolism through different forms and media. His work conflates and connects themes, resonating with the idea of history as one continuous cycle. In the past, for example, Kiefer has employed the symbolism of Norse mythology alongside the forms of National Socialist architecture, and for this exhibition he uses this as a basis for dramatic new paintings and sculpture that deal simultaneously with notions of creation and destruction, life and death.

The exhibition focuses on the major new installation Walhalla in the central corridor space, from which the other works thematically depart. Featuring a long, narrow room lined with oxidised lead, rows of fold-up steel beds are set close together and draped with dark grey crumpled lead sheets and covers. At the far end of the room, a black and white photograph mounted on lead depicts a lone figure walking away into a bleak, wintery landscape. The whole installation is dark, sombre and sparsely lit by a series of bare light bulbs, suggesting an institutional dormitory, military sleeping quarters or battlefield hospital. This sense of morbid claustrophobia is countered nonetheless by the offer of rest, of a break in the journey; a place perhaps of transformation.

In his new paintings, Kiefer employs a range of media – oil, acrylic, emulsion, shellac and clay – to emphasise the space of painting as a threshold into a mythic, imaginative realm. Here, a series of high towers are set amid desolate landscapes, their stacked forms exploding and dissolving into clouds of deep black or caustic blue smoke. A familiar motif in the artist’s work, the towers are based on his own sculptures made from rough concrete casts of shipping containers, including the brutalist-style towers of Jericho made for the set of In the Beginning staged at Opéra Bastille in Paris in 2009. In one such painting, Kiefer depicts the towers up-close, as if the viewer has found themselves in the ruins of some ancient city. In another work, which consists of three panels, flights of steps leading up to each tower reference the neo-classical, imposing architecture of Walhalla. Here, however, rather than the symbolic bastion of power that Walhalla aims to evoke, they are flat and two-dimensional, overlaid and set at impossible angles under the expanse of a meridian blue sky. In other pictures, which echo the landscapes of Van Gogh, the paintings are divided by a rough track, receding as far as the eye can see and often encrusted with layers of paint and deposited with a bitumen-like matter.

Several new vitrines, in different scales, continue these themes, through assemblages of soiled bleached clothes, stones, stacks of institutional metal beds, bicycles or small trees set upon squared off, cut-out sections of earth. Sealed off and displayed, these objects appear like fossils or unearthed artefacts entombed in glass and lead cases.

In the ‘9 x 9 x 9’ gallery, a dramatic, rusted metal spiral staircase disappears into the ceiling. Along its handrails hang curling strips of film reel, mounted onto lead, and soiled, robe-like dresses on wire coat hangers. In Norse mythology, Valhalla is linked to the Valkyries; women who decided who would live and who would die in battle. After making this choice, the Valkyries accompanied the dead to Valhalla, the hall of the slain in the afterlife ruled over by the god Odin. Entitled Sursum corda, this sculpture relates to the moment when the Valkyries arrive at Valhalla, their robes periodically discarded along the climb, suggesting loss and the trace of bodies that are no longer there.

Abstract Expressionism @ Royal Academy of Arts / until 2nd January 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Mon-Thu 10am-6pm
Sat-Sun 10am-6pm
Fri 10am-10pm

@ Royal Academy of Arts, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BD

Tickets: book online

www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/abstract-expressionism

Exploring an unparalleled period in American art, this long-awaited exhibition reveals the full breadth of a movement that will forever be associated with the boundless creative energy of 1950s New York.

In the “age of anxiety” surrounding the Second World War and the years of free jazz and Beat poetry, artists like Pollock, Rothko and de Kooning broke from accepted conventions to unleash a new confidence in painting.

Often monumental in scale, their works are at times intense, spontaneous and deeply expressive. At others they are more contemplative, presenting large fields of colour that border on the sublime.

These radical creations redefined the nature of painting, and were intended not simply to be admired from a distance but as two-way encounters between artist and viewer.

It was a watershed moment in the evolution of 20th-century art, yet, remarkably, there has been no major survey of the movement since 1959.

Intrigue: James Ensor by Luc Tuymans @ Royal Academy of Arts / until 29th January 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Sat-Thu 10am-6pm
Fri 10am-10pm

@ Royal Academy of Arts, The Sackler Wing, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BD

Tickets: £10.50 book online

www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/james-ensor-luc-tuymans

Despite spending his whole professional life in the Belgian seaside town of Ostend, James Ensor was very successful in his lifetime and exerted considerable influence on the development of Expressionism. An innovator and an outsider, he rebelled against the conservative art teachings of the late 19th century academy in Brussels, drawn instead to the avant-garde salons where his radical creative vision could thrive.

Ensor’s childhood spent among the fantastical treasures of his family’s curiosity shop offers a clue as to how the seeds of this wild imagination were sown. The imagery of masks and carnivals runs through much of his work, from vibrant colours and flamboyant costumes to an ever-present sense of drama and satire.

We invited the artist Luc Tuymans, a fellow Belgian and admirer of Ensor, to curate this unique exhibition. Taking a personal view, Tuymans looks back at Ensor’s singular career through a selection of his most bizarrely brilliant and gloriously surreal creations.

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