Tag: Art in London (page 1 of 6)

Tate Lates at Tate Modern on Friday 25 May 2018

This month celebrates The EY Exhibition: Picasso 1932 with a vibrant mix of art, music, film, drop-in workshops, pop-up talks and street food at Tate Modern. 🎨

PRISA PAINT
Join Ralph Bogard to mark Picasso’s prolific year of creativity with playful artistic sprints. See how many paintings and portraits you can create while the clock ticks. 3, 2, 1, Go!

(A)MUSE ME
Join Art Macabre for a surreal life-drawing salon with costumed models painted and posing as iconic portraits.

SURREALIST COLLAGE
Cut, stick and create an unconscious landscape, a DIY patchwork of visions from dreams and reality.

DREAM DANCE
Inspired by Picasso’s portraits of Marie-Thérèse Walter, inhabit and assemble a live ever-changing painting to create a new Grimehouse-injected masterpiece.

MUSIC PROGRAMMED BY NTS RADIO
Catch DJs Paul Camo and Jazzman on the Level 1 Bridge plus Field Work, Ony and Chloëdees in the Terrace Bar until 23.00.

POP UP QUIZ: LOVE, FAME, TRAGEDY
Show off your knowledge of love, fame and tragedy hosted by an expert on all three – performer Christopher Green.

FILM
JEAN PAINLEVÉ AND THE OCTOPUS
Discover the world of Jean Painlevé with The Octopus and The Love Life of the Octopus. Painlevé’s avant-garde underwater films reveal the wonders of the natural world in intricate detail. His films inspired artists including Picasso. Films will be screened on a loop.

GIVE A TALK AT TATE
Ever wondered if you could give a talk in a public gallery? Now you can! Our Visitor Experience team and the Uniqlo Ten Minute Talkers will guide you in giving your response to an artwork.

UNIQLO 10 MINUTE ART TALKS
Look out for staff and volunteers from across Tate, who will be sharing their personal insights into works from the collection in just 10 minutes each.

COLLECTION CONVERSATION
Got an opinion about the art in Tate Modern? Join lively conversations around key artworks.

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/late/uniqlo-tate-lates

Location:
Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Time:
6pm – 10pm

Price:
Free entry (See The EY Exhibition: Picasso 1932, Joan Jonas and Shape of Light for £10 each between 6pm – 8:30pm, book online)

Magali Reus: As mist, description at South London Gallery until 27 May 2018

London-based Dutch artist Magali Reus’s first major institutional solo exhibition in London comprises an entirely new body of work, framed by architectural interventions designed specifically for the South London Gallery’s main space. 🇳🇱

Magali Reus creates sculptural forms, often made in series. Her works are subtly suggestive of familiar machines or apparatus whose function and identity remains intentionally ambiguous. At the SLG, a new body of meticulously produced sculptures is presented in spatial chapters and designed to appear in a state of transition – frozen in progress, caught mid-function, or in a state of restoration, ruin or abandonment. Images and their representative materials are seen to move transformed between different chemical states. Visual elements are reproduced, layered and repeated in works that are individually crafted using complex casting, moulding and weaving techniques, pitting the aggressive emptiness of manufacture against the slow diligence of handiwork.

"The elaborate, meticulous and profound approach to materials in this exhibition gives Magali Reus the distinct aesthetic that earned her a nomination for the forthcoming Hepworth Sculpture Prize." Pick up a copy of this month's Art Monthly to read Cherry Smyth's review of Magali Reus at the SLG, the exhibition continues until 27 May. . Delve deeper into the exhibition at a talk by critic and curator Caoimhín Mac Giolla Léith on 9 May. Visit our website to find out more. . #magalireus #artmonthly #review #newreview #exhibition #londonexhibition #sculpture #sculptor #southlondongallery #freeexhibition #curatortalk #critictalk #hepworthsculptureprize #peckham #camberwell #contemporaryart #contemporaryartist #artist

A post shared by South London Gallery (@southlondongallery) on

www.southlondongallery.org/exhibitions/magali-reus-mist-description

Address:
South London Gallery, 65–67 Peckham Road, London SE5 8UH

Times:
Monday closed
Tuesday 11am-6pm
Wednesday 11am-9pm
Thursday 11am-6pm
Friday 11am-6pm (until 9pm to last Friday of the month)
Saturday 11am-6pm
Sunday 11am-6pm

Price:
Free entry

Under Cover: A Secret History of Cross-Dressers at The Photographers’ Gallery until 3 June 2018

Drawn from the extensive personal archives of filmmaker and photography collector Sébastien Lifshitz, this exhibition of amateur ‘found’ photographs from Europe and the US explores gender non-conformity and cross-dressing. Dating from 1880 onwards, the photos are mostly of unnamed and unknown figures – having been mainly collected from flea markets, garage sales, junk shops and ebay – and as such offer an unauthorised view into the worlds of individuals and groups choosing to defy gender conventions. 📷

Lifshitz’s initial collecting impulse was a fascination with the vernacular documentation of cross-dressing; his criteria to accumulate photographs, which showed men dressing as women and vice versa. As the collection grew, he began to trace both commonalities and differences between the images, which proposed a much more nuanced exploration of cross-dressing culture, not least by offering an opportunity to interrogate the assumptions we make about gender. The exhibition also includes exclusive images of Marie-Pierre Pruvot (born 11 November 1935) the celebrated Algerian-born French transsexual woman who performed under the stage name Bambi, before becoming a teacher, and who was the subject of an award-winning documentary by Lifshitz in 2013.

Brought together, the photographs reflect a range of styles and attitudes from theatrical, defiant, shy, proud, subversive and understated; showing individuals and groups from different classes, professions, genders and nationalities, whose only commonality is that they dared to play with dress codes in front of a camera, even if unable to do so in public.

Sébastien Lifshitz was born 1968 in Paris, France. An avid collector of photographs and an award-winning film director, his films have included Wild Side (2004), featuring a transsexual heroine and Bambi (2013), a documentary about France’s most celebrated transsexual woman.

www.thephotographersgallery.org.uk/whats-on/exhibition/under-cover-secret-history-cross-dressers

Location:
The Photographers’ Gallery, 16 – 18 Ramillies Street, London W1F 7LW

Times:
Mon – Sat: 10.00 – 18.00
Thu: 10.00 – 20.00
Sun: 11.00 – 18.00

Price:
Free admission before noon every day
£4 (£2.50 concessions) Exhibition Day Pass
£2.50 online booking

John Chamberlain: ENTIRELYFEARLESS at Gagosian until 26 May 2018

Chamberlain’s distinctive metal sculptures, often made of crushed and torqued automobile steel, reveal both the stately grace and the expressive plasticity of industrial materials. Exploring the interplay of color, sheen, weight, and balance, Chamberlain taps into the dynamic energy of Abstract Expressionism, the pre-manufactured elements of Pop and Minimalism, and the provocative curves and swells of high baroque. 🚗

In this exhibition, large-scale floor sculptures and wall-mounted works made over the course of four decades attest to the seemingly infinite variations of shape and color that Chamberlain explored throughout his career.

The centerpiece, ENTIRELYFEARLESS (2009), towers over the viewer, its scrunched red sides bracketed by car bumpers in shiny silver chrome. As fluid as folded drapery, and arresting as a marble monument, it subverts expectations of both abstraction and representation, while exuding a subtle figural quality. In BISHOPBUDD (2009), a nest of twisted metal strips sits atop a huddle of larger contorted planes of black and white steel—the robust, doming form recalling both an elegant tree and a menacing mushroom cloud. Chamberlain fostered a keen appreciation for poetry during the year he spent at Black Mountain College in 1955, and began to consider language as an integral part of his aesthetic approach. His dynamic titles—usually in all caps without spacing—often act as semiotic echoes of the sculptures themselves.

www.gagosian.com/exhibitions/john-chamberlain

Location:
Gagosian, 17–19 Davies Street, London W1K 3DE

Times:
Tuesday – Saturday 10am – 6pm

Price:
Free entry

Crossroads: Kauffman, Judd and Morris at Sprüth Magers until 31 March 2018

The show presents six works from Kauffman’s fertile period of 1966—1971, when he addressed the issues of structure and form in painting, the use of industrial materials, painting’s relationship to the wall, and dematerialisation. His work is contextualised by the inclusion of the stack piece Untitled (Bernstein 80-4) (1980) and the floor piece Untitled, DSS 234 (1970) by Donald Judd and the two felt works Untitled (1968) and Fountain (1971) by Robert Morris, as well as supplemental materials from the Kauffman archives. The exhibition presents the three artists together for the first time in Europe, and is Kauffman’s debut exhibition with the gallery in London. 😍

Although primarily known as a Los Angeles based artist, Craig Kauffman had a long history of engagement with the New York scene. In 1967, Kauffman relocated to New York, encouraged by the successes of his recent exhibitions in the city. While there, he began a friendship with Donald Judd, the artist who coined the phrase “specific objects” to describe his own work, a format which operated between painting and sculpture. Like the work of Judd, Kauffman’s three-dimensional plastic paintings occupy this liminal category. Their volume suggests that they are sculpture, but their presence on the wall reinforces their status as paintings. The unity of colour and form, achieved through the use of industrial materials, is another point of similarity between the two artists’ objectives.

Kauffman’s move to New York also reignited his friendship with Robert Morris, whom he had met in San Francisco ten years earlier. Their frequent discussions resulted in a short lived collaboration for the exhibition Using Walls (Indoors) at the Jewish Museum in 1970, which remained open for only one day, and which Kauffman described as a combination of both of the artists’ ideas. Only a few years prior, Morris begun making process-oriented felt pieces, in which he hung strips of industrial felt on the wall and allowed gravity to determine their shape. This influenced Kauffman’s conception of his series of Loops, in which sheets of spray painted Plexiglas seem to casually droop over a wire.

In Kauffman’s work, the environment constantly shifts as the viewer moves around each object. The light that moves across the curved edges of each piece facilitates the full comprehension of their forms. This draws comparisons to Morris’s own textual formulations in his influential Notes on Sculpture series, which advocated a phenomenological reading of the art object, how they change under varying conditions of light and space. The coloured shadows of the hanging Loops and the cast plastic forms that project into space directly implicate both the viewer and their supports.

Two of the earliest works from 1966 demonstrate how Kauffman addressed some of the issues which were important to Minimalist art and theory: seriality, industrial multiples, and anonymity. But where the New Yorkers’ opted for material and formal austerity—Kauffman’s supple plastic works were coloured and full of curves.

This exhibition is curated by Frank Lloyd, and follows Craig Kauffman: Works from 1962 – 1964 in dialogue with Francis Picabia and Marcel Duchamp, Sprüth Magers debut of the gallery’s representation of the Estate of Craig Kauffman in Berlin in 2016. The show is timed to run concurrently with the gallery’s Los Angeles presentation of Robert Irwin, who, along with Kauffman, was a major force in the definition of art from Los Angeles in the 1960s.

www.spruethmagers.com

Location:
Sprüth Magers, 7 Grafton Street, Mayfair, London W1S 4EJ

Times:
Tue-Sat 11am-6pm

Price:
Free entry

Harmonics in Space: Fred Butler at NOW Gallery until 29 April 2018

Welcome to Fred Butler’s therapeutic world. For NOW Gallery’s Design Commission Fred has created a joyful destination for healing with light, colour, shape and sound. In this environment she explores chromotherapy and light as an antidote to SAD – seasonal defective disorder – and to our urban living. 🌈 ✨ 🌈

SHAPE
Fred’s on-going interest in wellbeing led her to discover Rudolph Laban’s theory ‘Harmonics in Space’ of how our bodies are formed of polyhedral shapes within the environment. The first and smallest of the polyhedral is the tetrahedron, located at the centre. Vibrations here are closely related to breathing and our intense awareness of being alive. Fred believes that through constant computer work and hunching over devices, this tetrahedron gets blocked. Take this opportunity to stand, breath and expand your chests to recharge the whole body to be responsive.

COLOUR
“We need a balance of all the colour vibrations in sunlight to nourish us energetically”. As with shape Fred believes that colour has a profound affect on our moods, emotions and daily life. This immersive installation will give you the opportunity to step away from the grey of everyday into the full spectrum.

LIGHT
Dip your head into a polyhedral to encounter healing light. These shapes relate in concentric order, and form harmonic structures in the gallery. This environment offers an interplay between the conscious and unconscious levels of the psyche, stimulating the imagination and releasing creativity.

MAKE
Take time to make origami. We have an exclusive colourful mystic mascot to match your mood. Give yourself creative space to switch off, contemplate and make. Decorate your cosmic creature and keep as a magic memento of your day.

LISTEN
Headphones are available to experience a sonic journey by Natureboy created for the exhibition. He combines live instrumentation, synthesizers and his own voice in a series of rich, reflective and detailed compositions. The contrasting tempos, textures and moods reflect the many facets of Fred Butler’s exploration of the senses. “Music Heals”

BE
This exhibition is about looking after you. It’s inclusiveness addresses Fred’s concern about the future of human nature becoming introverted, isolated and immobile. Let go of instant gratification from constant scrolling and over stimulation which shortens attention span. Enjoy the moment, forget the past, don’t speculate the future be in the NOW.

www.nowgallery.co.uk/exhibitions/harmonics-in-space

Location:
NOW Gallery, The Gateway Pavilions, Peninsula Square, Greenwich Peninsula, London SE10 0SQ

Times:
Mon – Fri 10am – 7pm
Sat – Sun 11am – 4pm

Price:
Free entry

Mark Dion: Theatre of the Natural World at Whitechapel Gallery until 13 May 2018

Explorer, collector, activist and conjuror of theatrical environments American artist Mark Dion (b.1961) has travelled through rainforests and rubbish dumps to reveal the wonder and fragility of life on earth. Dion uses specimens – natural and manmade – to make uncanny representations of these environments. His drawings, sculptures and installations draw on the techniques of scientific enquiry and museum display; and on the telling of natural histories. 🌎

We embark on a journey through a sequence of installations created between 2000 and the present. The exhibition begins with The Library for the Birds of London (2018), a new commission continuing a series of aviaries Dion has created since 1993. The roomy sanctuary is a temporary home to 22 zebra finches, which are well-known for being social creatures. Visitors are invited into the aviary, which has an apple tree at its centre, referencing the tree of life. Over 600 books devoted to ornithology, environmentalism, literature and the natural sciences surround the birds. A scholar’s study invites us to unravel intricate drawings and models; while the Bureau for the Centre of the Study for Surrealism and its Legacy displays the strange magic of obsolete things. The muddy banks of the Thames have also yielded their treasures for poetic display in a gigantic cabinet; while The Wonder Workshop displays the ghosts of animals and instruments, many of them extinct and obsolescent. Each immersive environment is also a habitat, evoking the characters that observe, conserve or exploit the natural world.

www.whitechapelgallery.org/exhibitions/mark-dion

Location:
Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High Street, London E1 7QX

Times:
Monday closed
Tuesday 11am-6pm
Wednesday 11am-6pm
Thursday 11am-9pm
Friday 11am-6pm
Saturday 11am-6pm
Sunday 11am-6pm

Price:
£12.95 book online

Eddie Peake: Concrete Pitch at White Cube Bermondsey until 8 April 2018

Featuring new sculpture, painting, sound work and performance presented in an immersive and constructed environment. 🔊 🏙

The works weave autobiographical elements and an examination of self-identity with more general themes of desire, the body, architecture and urban landscape. The title ‘Concrete Pitch’ was inspired by the bare, concrete recreation ground in Finsbury Park in London where Peake grew up, which was used as a playground, a sports field, a meeting place for people of every age, class and ethnicity and location for encounters and scenarios of all kinds. Peake has said: ‘I used to treat things I did like graffiti and football and dance classes as not part of my art, then I had a sort of epiphany. I realised I want all those parts of my life in my art, and vice versa.’ For Peake, whose work can be located within a history of painting and object-making as well as more recent narratives of dance and performance art, the gallery can also be considered a stage; a place to orchestrate dramas of the everyday and to present the rich associative portrait of his childhood neighbourhood as a microcosm of urban, multicultural society.

Peake will be present in the gallery space throughout the exhibition, following a scheduled daily routine. Moving between various constructed spaces which include a private office and a triangular cell-like structure, accessible only by a tall ladder. The artist ‘plays’ himself, both offering up and dismantling the narrative of artistic ego, fictional protagonist and ‘real’ self. In another specially constructed room, visible behind a window, DJs from Kool London broadcast an online radio show during the exhibition. Broadcasting oldskool jungle and drum and bass from East London tower blocks since 1991, Kool FM is one of the longest running underground stations and provided the soundtrack to Peake’s adolescence.

The new, large-scale sound installation, Stroud Green Road runs through the gallery, consisting of a row of steel tables placed in a snaking line, just as the street of the same name runs through Peake’s neighbourhood. On their tray-like surfaces is an array of objects: small-scale sculptures as well as an eclectic selection of items purchased from shops on Stroud Green Road and several small speakers which emit a low, deep register like a wavering vibration or rattle. Composed by the artist using distorted samples and field recordings from the local area, this abstract soundscape creates a continuously looping hum, while a soft pink light floods the exhibition space. Continuing the theme of revealing and concealing, an airy white curtain hangs full-length from the ceiling, creating a natural spiralling passageway, in the centre of which a split-screen projection shows four dancers, each locked in an individual, looping sequence of complex, choreographed movement. The notion of the loop, a key motif within Peake’s work, is manifested in these repetitive movements, in the daily rituals the artist will be observing, in the sonic structure of the sound sculpture and in the music played by the Kool DJs. For Peake, these devices echo the entrapping loops of thought or behaviour associated with compulsion, obsession and depression.

In several new series of paintings, techniques of layering and masking are used to create vivid abstract compositions on canvas or hard, reflective stainless-steel panels. In one group, overlapping, spray-painted rectangles recall the urban patchwork of fly-posters, while in others, graffiti-like mark-making recedes into a bright void. This exploration of the void, whereby elements of the composition are left blank or undone creates works that reflect back to the viewer a sense ennui, even depression. In another group of oil on canvas works, a rainbow-coloured text defines the form of a head in profile spelling out the enigmatic slogans ‘A More Uncomfortable And Realistic History’, and ‘We To The Ramp Go For Relinquish Unearned Privileges And Powers’. Suggesting the direct, angry tone of graffiti, social media and urban music, these works are an expression of ideas that have formerly been implicit in Peake’s work.

www.whitecube.com/exhibitions/eddie_peake_bermondsey_2018

Location:
White Cube Bermondsey, 144 – 152 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ

Times:
Tuesday – Saturday 10am – 6pm
Sunday 12pm – 6pm

Price:
Free entry

The Female Gaze at Getty Images Gallery until 14 March 2018

2017 was the Year of Women: it began with massive women’s marches in the US and ended with a series of high-profile resignations by powerful men over sexual harassment scandals. 🙎 👀

This groundswell of feminism may have erupted in response to current events, but it has also been slowly and steadily growing for decades. Over the past five years, female photographers have actively sought to redefine the manner and styles in which women are visually represented across advertising, film, and other media.

In response to this change, Getty Images has recruited a new generation of image makers and partnered with a number of organizations such as LeanIn.org, Refinery 29, and Muslim Girl to expand and evolve the photographic landscape.

www.gettyimagesgallery.co.uk/exhibitions/archive/the-female-gaze

Location:
Getty Images Gallery, 46 Eastcastle Street, London W1W 8DX

Times:
Monday – Friday 10am – 5:30pm
Saturday 12pm – 5:30pm

Price:
Free entry

Rise Art Prize at House of Vans until 25 February 2018

The most exciting contemporary artists from around the world are shown in a new public exhibition hosted by global art platform Rise Art. Perfect for art lovers and culture hounds. 👨‍🎨 👩‍🎨

Showcasing the works of 25 finalists from the inaugural Rise Art Prize, a global competition seeking to unearth new and established talent from around the world. The exhibition allows the public to experience these artists first hand, with exclusive talks and tours by top industry figures and curators.

Spanning works from UK and international contemporary artists across the globe, the exhibition is a one-stop-shop to discover the latest innovators in art, including incredible sculptures, photography, street art, paint and much more.

www.riseartprize.com/what-its-about

Location:
House of Vans, Arches, 228-232 Station Approach Road, Lambeth, London SE1 8SW

Times:
Thursday – Friday 4pm – 10pm
Saturday 10am – 8pm
Sunday 12pm – 6pm

Price:
Free entry

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