Tag: art shows (page 1 of 3)

Repeat After Me – Oddly Head @ Hang-Up Gallery / until 3rd September 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Mon – closed
Tue-Sun 12pm-6pm

@ Hang-Up Gallery, 81 Stoke Newington Road, London N16 8A

www.hanguppictures.com/exhibition/oddly-head-repeat-after-me

Inaugural exhibition by London-based artist Oddly Head. Celebrating the brand new collection of bold, succinct and highly topical text-based limited edition screen prints and original mixed media works. 📸

With the June election, a reality TV star in the White House, and increasing political and military tension in more countries than we can remember, Oddly Head’s new body of work shrewdly comments on society’s fragile and daunting state.

Portraying how our compulsion to create an online second self has prevented our ability to make our own decisions with catastrophic results. In his latest series, Oddly Head, the alter ego of artist Tim Fishlock, neatly sums up our worst fears for leaders who abandon politics in favour of infantile populism and who are now at liberty to indulge their appetite for both distraction and destruction.

Highlighted in his new collection of repetitive ’ME’ pieces, the artist discusses our uneasy relationship with technology and how we are being subjugated by our own invention.

“We are trading privacy and intimacy, companionship and love for a public existence and a virtual thumbs up from people we’ve never met. Keenly aware that we’re being judged on our every pronouncement and every picture we post, we have become absurdly self-absorbed. And who spends more time thinking about themselves and their place in the world than the artist…?”

Light relief comes in the form of another new work titled 99 Problems. He has cunningly cast a dropped 99 ice cream in plaster and has been decorating the streets of London with this irreverent artwork.

Summer Screenprints Film Poster Exhibition @ Somerset House / until 23rd August 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Mon, Tue, Sat, Sun 10:00-18:00 (last entry 17:00)
Wed–Fri 11:00-20:00 (last entry 19:00)

From 10-23rd August open 10:00-18:00 and additionally from 18:30–21:00 for Film4 Summer Screen ticket holders

@ Somerset House, West Wing Galleries, Strand, London WC2R 1LA

Free entry

www.printclublondon.com/summer-screenprints-film-poster-exhibition
www.somersethouse.org.uk/whats-on/summer-screen-prints

Somerset House and Print Club London are collaborating on the fifth edition of the Summer Screen Prints exhibition, which brings limited-edition film prints to Somerset House throughout August. 🎬📽🎞

This year’s display will be the most extensive to date, with 20 original, screen-printed film poster artworks inspired by the Film4 Summer Screen programme.

Emerging, international artists respond to a moment, theme, character or quote from their favourite film in the season, including Joe Cruz, whose colourful and intimate work captures a pivotal moment in this year’s ‘Best Picture’ Oscar winner Moonlight, while Hattie Stewart‘s bold and striking reimagining of Cruel Intentions bares the malice of the cult film’s protagonist.

This free exhibition, open each day across the season, will enable you to buy the original, affordable works at Somerset House and on the Print Club London website for £60. With effortless acess to the exhibition from the Edmond J. Safra Fountain Court, film-goers will be able to enjoy special late openings ahead of each film screening.

Thursday 10th August – Premiere: An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power
Friday 11th August – Victoria
Saturday 12th August – Donnie Darko + The Omen
Sunday 13th August – The Philadelphia Story
Monday 14th August – Moonlight
Tuesday 15th August – All The President’s Men
Wednesday 16th August – Premiere: The Square
Thursday 17th August – Bhaji on the Beach
Friday 18th August – In Bruges
Saturday 19th August – Jaws + Deliverance
Sunday 20th August – My Neighbour Totoro
Monday 21st August – Cruel Intentions
Tuesday 22nd August – Blow-up
Wednesday 23rd August – Premiere: Patti Cake$

Summer Exhibition 2017 @ Royal Academy of Arts / until 20th August 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Mon – Thu, Sat – Sun 10am – 6pm
Fri 10am – 10pm

@ Royal Academy of Arts, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BD

Tickets: £14 book online

www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/summer-exhibition-2017

Everything you’ll see at the Summer Exhibition ☀️😎 represents the art being made today. Expect to find a panorama of art in all media, from painting, printmaking, film and photography to sculpture, architectural works and performance art.

Almost 250 years ago, the RA’s founding members agreed to hold an “Annual Exhibition of Paintings, Sculptures and Designs … open to all Artists”, to help finance the training of young artists in the Royal Academy Schools. Now, nearly 250 years later, ahead of our big anniversary in 2018, Royal Academician Eileen Cooper, explores themes of discovery and new talent from her unique position as Keeper of the Royal Academy – the Academician who is responsible for supporting and guiding the students.

Cooper takes on the mantle of coordinating the largest open submission exhibition in the world, hanging over 1,200 works by artists established and lesser-known in the space of just eight days. Don’t miss work by internationally renowned artists Rosemarie Trockel, Julian Schnabel, Hassan Hajjaj, Secundino Hernández, Isaac Julien, Tomoaki Suzuki, Mark Wallinger and Sean Scully RA, as well as submissions by new Royal Academicians including Gilbert & George and David Adjaye. Other highlights include Yinka Shonibare RA’s six metre high colourful wind sculpture in the RA Courtyard, and Farshid Moussavi RA’s unique focus on construction coordination drawings in the Architecture Gallery.

Howard Hodgkin: Absent Friends @ National Portrait Gallery / until Sunday 18th June 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Sat – Wed, 10am – 6pm
Thu – Fri, 10am – 9pm

@ National Portrait Gallery, St Martin’s Place, London WC2H 0HE

Tickets: £10 book online

www.npg.org.uk/whatson/howard-hodgkin-absent-friends/home

This is the first exhibition of portraits by Howard Hodgkin (1932-2017), one of Britain’s greatest artists. Hodgkin’s paintings are characterised by rich colour, complex illusionistic space and sensuous brushwork. By emphasising these pictorial elements, his work frequently appears entirely abstract. However, over the course of 65 years, a principal concern of Hodgkin’s art has been to evoke a human presence.

The role of memory, the expression of emotion, and the exploration of relationships between people and places are all preoccupations. The exhibition explores Hodgkin’s development of a personal visual language of portraiture, which challenges traditional forms of representation.

Cat and Mouse @ Village Underground / Thursday 8th and Friday 9th June 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 7pm-8:45pm

@ Village Underground, 4 Holywell Lane, London EC2A 3PQ

Tickets: £13.20 book online

www.villageunderground.co.uk/events/cat-mouse

A theatrical animation experience, involving an animated cat and mouse and a band of dogs. Expect: live music, theatrical devices, crazy cartoons, high octane action, fun and frolics, extreme violence, moments of edification, sadomasochism, the face machine, skeletons, dogs, dancing, and more! 🐱🐭

Featuring the the animations of Paul Bill Barritt (1927) with live music by Officer Pup, courtesy of composer and Edinburgh Fringe winner, Laurence Owen and band plus, we introduce Miss Lesley Ewen as The Law.

The cultural history of anthropomorphised animals is long and deep, as long and deep as the river of imagination itself. We see ourselves reflected back at ourselves within those furry beings. Cat and Mouse is one such development.

Taking its germ from the great peddler of anthropomorphised cat and mouse chaos Mr. George Herriman, it proceeds in a zigzag line through the gamut of human idiocy from art to war, from technology to industry, from civilisation to love all via the shenanigans of various humanimals mostly of the rodent/feline variety with some notably canine overseers holding court over the proceedings.

Sticking within the traditions of artistic purveyance there will be visuals in the form of animations, sets and costume, there will be live music and there will be storytelling. A theatrical animation experience unlike anything seen before, alike to everything seen once upon a time, long ago…

Block Universe @ various venues / from 29th May to 4th June 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: various

@ Various venues including the Royal Academy of Arts and Somerset House, as well as unique locations across the capital

Tickets: various book online

www.blockuniverse.co.uk

Block Universe, London’s international performance art festival, is back for the third year running, from 29 May to 4 June 2017, with a programme of newly commissioned performances, UK premieres, talks and workshops.

Week long festival presenting work by some of the most exciting UK-based and international artists working in performance art today:
Eglė Budvytytė
Işıl Eğrikavuk
Liz Magic Laser
Nicole Bachmann
Rory Pilgrim
Stina Nyberg
Will Rawls
Young In Hong
Zadie Xa
Collaboration between Kim Coleman, Zoë Poluch and Cara Tolmie

In post-Brexit Britain, this year’s festival theme will explore ideas surrounding political bodies, both personal and public, addressing identity politics and notions of nationhood set against a changing socio-political landscape. Looking at networked communities and the power of collective voices, Block Universe will champion work that questions the status quo in divisive times.

With four UK premieres and five site-specific commissions in noteworthy settings across central London, the works include: choreography modelled on the Gwangju uprising taking place in the public square of the Royal Academy of Arts courtyard by Young In Hong; Stina Nyberg’s choreographic work questioning Swedish physical ideals from the 1920s through a visually described performance; Rory Pilgrim’s collaboration with a youth group exploring sci-fi robotic support systems of care set in a Quaker Hall; and Isil Egrikavuk’s performative dinner exploring parallels between Pluto’s demotion from our solar system with the UK’s exit from the EU, amongst others.

Listings on Facebook.

Richard Tuttle: The Critical Edge @ Pace Gallery / until 13 May 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tues-Sat 10-6

@ Pace Gallery, 6 Burlington Gardens, London W1S 3ET

Free entry

www.pacegallery.com/exhibitions/12860/the-critical-edge

An exhibition of recent works in fabric by Richard Tuttle. First presented at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, in 2016, the exhibition follows two other major exhibitions of Tuttle’s work. In 2014, The Whitechapel Gallery surveyed the artist’s career from the 1960s to today and Tate Modern commissioned Tuttle’s largest textile sculpture to date for its iconic Turbine Hall.

Richard Tuttle (b. 1941, Rahway, New Jersey) is one of the most significant artists working today. Since the mid-1960s, he has created an extraordinarily varied body of work that eludes historical or stylistic categorization. Tuttle’s work exists in the space between painting, sculpture, poetry, assemblage, and drawing. He draws beauty out of humble materials, reflecting the fragility of the world in his poetic works. Without a specific reference point, his investigations of line, volume, color, texture, shape, and form are imbued with a sense of spirituality and informed by a deep intellectual curiosity. Language, spatial relationship, and scale are also central concerns for the artist, who maintains an acute awareness for the viewer’s aesthetic experience. Tuttle was the Artist in Residence at the Getty Research Institute from September 2012–June 2013. The artist lives and works in Mount Desert, Maine; Abiquiu, New Mexico and New York City.

Ashley Bickerton: Ornamental Hysteria @ Newport Street Gallery / until 20th August 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Tuesday – Sunday 10am – 6pm
Closed on Mondays

@ Newport Street Gallery, Newport Street, London SE11 6AJ

Free entry

www.newportstreetgallery.com/exhibitions/ashley-bickerton

Spanning more than three decades of Bickerton’s career and features 51 works, including a significant display of new and previously unexhibited pieces. It is the artist’s first UK show since 2009 and runs throughout all six spaces at Newport Street Gallery.

Bickerton moved to New York in 1982 and after working as a painting assistant to Jack Goldstein, he emerged as a key figure on the newly exploding East Village art scene. Within the context of the culture of commodification sweeping America he rose to prominence as part of an amorphous movement that was branded ‘Neo-Geometric Conceptualism’. Alongside artists such as Haim Steinbach and Jeff Koons, Bickerton endeavoured to reframe the practice of art production in response to the new, seductive mechanisms of desire at work in society.

Bickerton abandoned New York in 1993, eventually settling in Bali, where he still lives and works. Whilst a number of his themes prevailed, the materiality of his work shifted dramatically after this self-imposed exile from the urban environment.

Both in materiality and content, Bickerton’s work resists categorisation. On the diversity of his mediums – photocollage, appropriated image, digital image, paint and sculpture – he states: “Painting is far too cartoony and lacks the backbone of factuality; photography is too clinical and incapable of loony launches into the ether; and sculpture can be just downright presumptuous. […] Only in their combination do I find comfort.”

Bickerton’s conceptual commitment to intersectionality extends to his subject matter; his audacious and technically complex assemblages are predicated on themes of opposition and duality, for example representation and reality, creativity and commodity, nature and artifice, idyll and apocalypse. This is evident in his earlier work on display in gallery 1, which offers a sardonic critique of contemporary consumer culture and the commodification of the ‘art object’ via steel and aluminium wall-mounted ‘Culturescapes’ from the ‘Logo’ and ‘Non-Word Word’ series. Galleries 3 and 4 are dominated by Bickerton’s ‘Sea’ and ‘Landscapes’ – overblown and incongruous, they contain ephemera from the anthroposphere in the simulated shells of transportation devices. In part, these “truly contemporary” landscapes might be read as a dystopian view of the devastating impact of man on the ecosphere.

Throughout his career, Bickerton has challenged the relevancy of traditional art-historical tropes. His ‘self-portraits’ similarly parody the mythological figure of ‘the artist’, who is represented in the guise of the brands he chooses to endorse in Tormented Self-Portrait: Susie at Arles (25 Years) (2014) and as a five-bodied, technicoloured serpent in the monumental 5 Snake Heads (2009), on display in Newport Street’s double-height gallery 2.

Bickerton’s practice evolved in the late 90s to incorporate digital image and photography. In portraits such as Smiling Woman (2009), models (often family members and friends) are heavily made-up and photographed, then distorted in Photoshop before the image is printed on canvas and re-painted. These paintings are amongst Bickerton’s most overtly satirical, presenting lurid, constructed visions of life on a generic Pacific / Caribbean island.

Eduardo Paolozzi @ Whitechapel Gallery / until 14th May 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Sun, 11am-6pm (Thu until 9pm)

@ Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High Street, London E1 7QX

Tickets: £11.95 book online

www.whitechapelgallery.org/exhibitions/eduardo-paolozzi

Exhibition about one of the most innovative and irreverent artists of the 20th century. Considered the ‘godfather of Pop Art’, his collages, sculptures and prints challenged artistic convention, from the 1950s through to the Swinging Sixties and advent of ‘Cool Britannia’ in the 1990s.

This major Eduardo Paolozzi retrospective spans five decades and features over 250 works; from the artist’s post-War bronzes, revolutionary screen-prints and collages, to his bold textiles and fashion designs.

Alongside Paolozzi’s early brutalist concrete sculptures, highlights include material from his groundbreaking performance lecture Bunk! (1952), his large-scale Whitworth Tapestry (1967) and the iconic sculpture Diana as an Engine (1963).

Jo Brocklehurst: Nobodies and Somebodies @ House of Illustration / until 14th May 2017 ✏️

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Sun, 10am-6pm

@ 2 Granary Square, King’s Cross, N1C 4BH

Tickets: £7.50 book online

www.houseofillustration.org.uk/whats-on/current-future-events/jo-brocklehurst-nobodies-and-somebodies

Drawing live in fetish clubs, punk squats and on the performance scene of 1970-90s London, Berlin and New York, Jo Brocklehurst’s artwork is a unique record of subculture.

Her figurative paintings from fetish clubs document experiments with sex, androgyny and couture that later inspired the mainstream fashion collections of Jean Paul Gaultier, while her best-known portraits from the 1980s offer a raw, beautiful and female perspective on punk.

Co-curated by her model and muse Isabelle Bricknall, the exhibition also features her drawings of Berlin’s 1990s performing arts scene for the Berliner Zeitung newspaper, alongside clubland-inspired interpretations of Alice Through the Looking Glass.

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