Tag: art shows (page 1 of 2)

Richard Tuttle: The Critical Edge @ Pace Gallery / until 13 May 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tues-Sat 10-6

@ Pace Gallery, 6 Burlington Gardens, London W1S 3ET

Free entry

www.pacegallery.com/exhibitions/12860/the-critical-edge

An exhibition of recent works in fabric by Richard Tuttle. First presented at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, in 2016, the exhibition follows two other major exhibitions of Tuttle’s work. In 2014, The Whitechapel Gallery surveyed the artist’s career from the 1960s to today and Tate Modern commissioned Tuttle’s largest textile sculpture to date for its iconic Turbine Hall.

Richard Tuttle (b. 1941, Rahway, New Jersey) is one of the most significant artists working today. Since the mid-1960s, he has created an extraordinarily varied body of work that eludes historical or stylistic categorization. Tuttle’s work exists in the space between painting, sculpture, poetry, assemblage, and drawing. He draws beauty out of humble materials, reflecting the fragility of the world in his poetic works. Without a specific reference point, his investigations of line, volume, color, texture, shape, and form are imbued with a sense of spirituality and informed by a deep intellectual curiosity. Language, spatial relationship, and scale are also central concerns for the artist, who maintains an acute awareness for the viewer’s aesthetic experience. Tuttle was the Artist in Residence at the Getty Research Institute from September 2012–June 2013. The artist lives and works in Mount Desert, Maine; Abiquiu, New Mexico and New York City.

Ashley Bickerton: Ornamental Hysteria @ Newport Street Gallery / until 20th August 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Tuesday – Sunday 10am – 6pm
Closed on Mondays

@ Newport Street Gallery, Newport Street, London SE11 6AJ

Free entry

www.newportstreetgallery.com/exhibitions/ashley-bickerton

Spanning more than three decades of Bickerton’s career and features 51 works, including a significant display of new and previously unexhibited pieces. It is the artist’s first UK show since 2009 and runs throughout all six spaces at Newport Street Gallery.

Bickerton moved to New York in 1982 and after working as a painting assistant to Jack Goldstein, he emerged as a key figure on the newly exploding East Village art scene. Within the context of the culture of commodification sweeping America he rose to prominence as part of an amorphous movement that was branded ‘Neo-Geometric Conceptualism’. Alongside artists such as Haim Steinbach and Jeff Koons, Bickerton endeavoured to reframe the practice of art production in response to the new, seductive mechanisms of desire at work in society.

Bickerton abandoned New York in 1993, eventually settling in Bali, where he still lives and works. Whilst a number of his themes prevailed, the materiality of his work shifted dramatically after this self-imposed exile from the urban environment.

Both in materiality and content, Bickerton’s work resists categorisation. On the diversity of his mediums – photocollage, appropriated image, digital image, paint and sculpture – he states: “Painting is far too cartoony and lacks the backbone of factuality; photography is too clinical and incapable of loony launches into the ether; and sculpture can be just downright presumptuous. […] Only in their combination do I find comfort.”

Bickerton’s conceptual commitment to intersectionality extends to his subject matter; his audacious and technically complex assemblages are predicated on themes of opposition and duality, for example representation and reality, creativity and commodity, nature and artifice, idyll and apocalypse. This is evident in his earlier work on display in gallery 1, which offers a sardonic critique of contemporary consumer culture and the commodification of the ‘art object’ via steel and aluminium wall-mounted ‘Culturescapes’ from the ‘Logo’ and ‘Non-Word Word’ series. Galleries 3 and 4 are dominated by Bickerton’s ‘Sea’ and ‘Landscapes’ – overblown and incongruous, they contain ephemera from the anthroposphere in the simulated shells of transportation devices. In part, these “truly contemporary” landscapes might be read as a dystopian view of the devastating impact of man on the ecosphere.

Throughout his career, Bickerton has challenged the relevancy of traditional art-historical tropes. His ‘self-portraits’ similarly parody the mythological figure of ‘the artist’, who is represented in the guise of the brands he chooses to endorse in Tormented Self-Portrait: Susie at Arles (25 Years) (2014) and as a five-bodied, technicoloured serpent in the monumental 5 Snake Heads (2009), on display in Newport Street’s double-height gallery 2.

Bickerton’s practice evolved in the late 90s to incorporate digital image and photography. In portraits such as Smiling Woman (2009), models (often family members and friends) are heavily made-up and photographed, then distorted in Photoshop before the image is printed on canvas and re-painted. These paintings are amongst Bickerton’s most overtly satirical, presenting lurid, constructed visions of life on a generic Pacific / Caribbean island.

Eduardo Paolozzi @ Whitechapel Gallery / until 14th May 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Sun, 11am-6pm (Thu until 9pm)

@ Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High Street, London E1 7QX

Tickets: £11.95 book online

www.whitechapelgallery.org/exhibitions/eduardo-paolozzi

Exhibition about one of the most innovative and irreverent artists of the 20th century. Considered the ‘godfather of Pop Art’, his collages, sculptures and prints challenged artistic convention, from the 1950s through to the Swinging Sixties and advent of ‘Cool Britannia’ in the 1990s.

This major Eduardo Paolozzi retrospective spans five decades and features over 250 works; from the artist’s post-War bronzes, revolutionary screen-prints and collages, to his bold textiles and fashion designs.

Alongside Paolozzi’s early brutalist concrete sculptures, highlights include material from his groundbreaking performance lecture Bunk! (1952), his large-scale Whitworth Tapestry (1967) and the iconic sculpture Diana as an Engine (1963).

Jo Brocklehurst: Nobodies and Somebodies @ House of Illustration / until 14th May 2017 ✏️

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Sun, 10am-6pm

@ 2 Granary Square, King’s Cross, N1C 4BH

Tickets: £7.50 book online

www.houseofillustration.org.uk/whats-on/current-future-events/jo-brocklehurst-nobodies-and-somebodies

Drawing live in fetish clubs, punk squats and on the performance scene of 1970-90s London, Berlin and New York, Jo Brocklehurst’s artwork is a unique record of subculture.

Her figurative paintings from fetish clubs document experiments with sex, androgyny and couture that later inspired the mainstream fashion collections of Jean Paul Gaultier, while her best-known portraits from the 1980s offer a raw, beautiful and female perspective on punk.

Co-curated by her model and muse Isabelle Bricknall, the exhibition also features her drawings of Berlin’s 1990s performing arts scene for the Berliner Zeitung newspaper, alongside clubland-inspired interpretations of Alice Through the Looking Glass.

Ten Days Six Nights @ The Tanks – Tate Modern / from 24th March until 2nd April 2017 🌝🌚

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: various

@ Tate Modern, The Tanks, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: book online (free during normal day opening hours and charge for evening performances)

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/ten-days-six-nights

Ten Inspiring Days
Brining together an intergenerational selection of artists that have been invited to stage their work as a space that extends a form of hospitality or community, to other artists and visitors alike. The artists create images of networks and forms of participation that link natural environment with social media, organic and technological, human and non-human.

Isabel Lewis is in residence throughout the duration of the exhibition hosting a number of her signature occasions, combining music, food, drink and perfume to create an alternative environment for dance, discussions and invited musicians.

CAMP, a collaborative studio founded in Mumbai in 2007, use the Transformer Galleries as a space to share a selection of rarely-seen installations from the past 15 years that rework everyday circuits of electricity.

Wu Tsang and Fred Moten present Gravitational Feel, a sculptural performance using fabric and sound to explore the social and physical significance of touch and voice. Installations by Carlos Casas, Phill Niblock, and Lorenzo Senni exist as site-specific environments open to the public by day.

Fujiko Nakaya will transform the South Terrace for the first time with an immersive fog sculpture, animated by a light and soundscape made in collaboration with Nakaya’s historic collaborators: Ryuichi Sakamoto and Shiro Takatani; and host performances by renowned dancer and choreographer Min Tanaka.

Six unmissable nights
The daytime installations act as springboards for six nights of ticketed live performances. You can browse the full programme for each night below and book tickets online. The live nights will showcase both established and emerging artists working across performance, film, sound and dance.

Late Shift: Drop-in Drawing: He to She @ National Portrait Gallery (NPG) / Thursday and Fridays 👩‍🎨

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 18:00

@ National Portrait Gallery (NPG), St Martin’s Place, London WC2H 0HE (Meet in Room 22, Floor 1)

Free entry

www.npg.org.uk/whatson/lateshift/whats-on-late-shift

To celebrate International Women’s Day and HeForShe Arts Week, join artist Robin-Lee Hall to re-imagine what the Gallery’s Victorian Collection might have looked like if women had been afforded the same opportunities as their male counterparts and their achievements recorded in portraiture.

Consider questions of gender identity and representation in your drawings and set about redressing the balance. At 20.15 you will get the opportunity to put your work out and Robin with conduct a friendly Friday critique.

There is a short introduction at 18.30 but feel free to drop in whenever you like. You can stay for 10 minutes or 2 hours. The class is suitable for everyone from complete beginners to accomplished artists.

All materials are provided, so no need to bring anything with you unless you want to work in your own sketchbook or on an iPad.

Every Friday there is a free drop-in drawing activity happening in the Gallery.

Also happening:

Live Music: Luca Luciano and Jose Henrique de Campos
Room 20, Floor 2
Music for clarinet and guitar by Villa-Lobos, Berio, De Falla and Poulenc

Sonia Boyce: We move in her way @ ICA / until 16th Apr 2017 💁

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Sun 11am–11pm (Thu until 9pm)

@ Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA), The Mall, London SW1Y 5AH

£1 day membership, find out more

www.ica.art/whats-on/sonia-boyce-we-move-her-way

A new body of work created especially for the ICA. Involving the exploratory vocal and movement performances of Elaine Mitchener, Barbara Gamper and her dancers Eve Stainton, Ria Uttridge and Be van Vark, with an invited audience.

A multi-media installation has been generated from the documentation of their open-ended live performance. The title of the work suggests two possible readings: that ‘she’ dictates our movements; or that we obstruct ‘hers’, with both interpretations suggesting power is at play.

Boyce has a participatory art practice where she invites others to engage performatively with improvisation. In this process, she encourages contributors to exercise their own responses to the situations she enables, where she steps back from any directorial position to observe the activities and dynamics of exchange as they unfold. Once the performance is played out and documented, Boyce reshapes the material generated, in what she calls “recouping the remains”, to create the artwork as a multi-media installation.

We move in her way was created in this way as a performative laboratory, in which the audience and performers negotiated the ICA Theatre space around sculptural objects and their own bodies. Play and playfulness unfolded during the open-ended live performance, sparking a breakdown of assumed order between performers and audience. The dynamics of power-play shifted between the masked audience, the performers and the sculptural objects created as a means to facilitate touch and being together, whilst remaining distinct.

Making Nature: How we see animals @ Wellcome Collection / until 21st May 2017 🐶🐱🐯🐵

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10am-6pm, until 10pm on Thursdays and closed Mondays

@ Wellcome Collection, 183 Euston Road, London NW1 2BE

Free entry

www.wellcomecollection.org/MakingNature

No matter how you see nature now, you’ll never see it the same way again.

Kicking off a year-long exploration into our relationship with nature, this major exhibition examines what we think, feel and value about other species and the consequences this has for the world around us. It brings together over 100 fascinating objects from literature, film, taxidermy and photography to reveal the hierarchies in our view of the natural world and consider how these influence our actions, or inactions, towards the planet.

Organised around four themes – ‘Ordering’, ‘Displaying’, ‘Observing’ and ‘Making’ – this exhibition questions the approach of ‘learning through looking’, charts the changing fashions of museum displays alongside society’s changing attitudes to the world around us, examines the search for an authentic encounter with nature, and looks at how humans have intentionally altered other organisms.

Richard Wilson: Stealing Space @ Annely Juda Fine Art / 25th March 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Monday–Friday 10:00–18:00
Saturday 11:00–17:00

@ Annely Juda Fine Art, 4th Floor, 23 Dering Street, London W1S 1AW

Free entry

www.annelyjudafineart.co.uk

The artist’s first at the gallery and his first solo show in London since unveiling his major site-specific work, Slipstream, at Heathrow Airport’s Terminal 2. The exhibition features four new works, two of which are in direct response to the gallery’s internal and external architecture.

Works in this exhibition dominate the gallery’s space and stand, in places, above the height of the architectural beams. In the main room, Wilson has created a sculpture of a slice of the negative space or “space between” the hallway and staircase leading to the gallery’s main entrance. Partial details of a doorway, steps or a bannister in negative form are visible on the sculpture which sits straight on the ground at a tilted angle, offering a reassessment of the perhaps completely unnoticed yet familiar surroundings the viewer has just encountered. Block of Dering, meanwhile, takes the façade of the gallery building at 23 Dering Street and reconfigures it into a near-cube. Even the gallery’s signage can be made out in this sculpture which presents the local architecture in an entirely new way.

In the second room, a sculpture delineates the “space between” an area of Wilson’s home in South East London whilst Blocka Flats takes a piece of household furniture reconfigured into a form reminiscent of an urban landscape on a micro scale, the very same landscape which Wilson refers to in other works on a 1:1 scale. Two preparatory sketches for each work hang near their sculptural counterparts, whilst in the final room, Wilson shows maquettes of past works and those not yet realised.

Richard Wilson is a world-renowned British artist whose architectural interventions have won him acclaim throughout his career. Wilson rose to prominence in 1987 when his installation, 20:50 – consisting of a room filled to waist height with reflective sump oil – was shown at Matt’s Gallery in London and purchased by The Saatchi Gallery. Wilson has gone on to create a series of predominantly site-specific works, most recently Slipstream (2014), which stands at an impressive 78 meters at Heathrow Airport’s Terminal 2. Wilson was appointed visiting research professor at the University of East London in 2004, elected as a member of the Royal Academy in 2006 and in 2008 was awarded an honorary doctorate at the University of Middlesex. He has created permanent and temporary works at prominent locations worldwide and his works have been shown at institutions such as The Serpentine Gallery, London; Saatchi Gallery, London; The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; National Gallery of Australia, Canberra and Museu d’Art Contemporani, Barcelona.

“I need that initial thing from the real world because I’ve always been concerned with the way you can alter someone’s perception, knock their view off kilter. And to do that I need to start with something we think we understand.”

Bojan Šarčević invagination @ Modern Art / until 14th January 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Sat 11am-6pm

@ Modern Art, 4-8 Helmet Row, London EC1V 3QJ

Free entry

www.modernart.net

Third solo exhibition with Modern Art. Šarčević’s work was the subject of survey exhibitions at Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein, Vaduz, Liechtenstein, and Institut d’Art Contemporain, Villeurbanne, France (2012).

Bojan Šarčević was born in Belgrade in 1974. He studied at L’Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris, France, graduating in 1997, and undertook postgraduate study at Rijksakademie, Amsterdam, Netherlands, from 1999 to 2000. He lives and works in Berlin and Paris.

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