Tag: art shows (page 1 of 5)

Nøtel: Lawrence Lek & Kode9 at arebyte Gallery until 1 September 2018

Nøtel is an immersive, two-chapter, multimedia installation by London-based artist Lawrence Lek created in collaboration with electronic musician Kode9 (Steve Goodman). The project installation transforms the gallery into a marketing suite for the fictional Nøtel Corporation, advertising future plans for a global expansion of the hotel chain. The exhibition uses similar conventions of property marketing, including a video trailer and virtual reality, to conjure an image of a future luxury hotel as if it will be developed on site. 🌍 🌎 🌏

Set in a future London, where elite society no longer requires permanent housing but rather stays in temporary accommodation, Nøtel speculates on critical issues surrounding the newly-regenerated areas of the capital, including London City Island, where the exhibition’s first iteration is situated. Nøtel uses speculative architecture as a tool to imagine the future of these developments, and to address ideas around the politics of labour and an automated workforce, juxtaposed with notions of alienation and belonging.

Nøtel proposes a globalised, standardised way of living. Its alternative approach would alleviate the overpopulation of cities and the struggles of obtaining property, promoting an economic model which saves money by replacing humans with AI to complete menial tasks. Nøtel exposes the fine line between cost-efficiency and hyper-luxury – after checking in at the Nøtel, residents are left alone, broaching the question of hypothetical social-realism and what luxurious lifestyle means for future generations.

The site-specific installation relates to the rapid transformation of a post-industrial area into a new vision of urban living. The project was co-commissioned with Stroom Den Haag in the Netherlands, integrating ideas about European globalisation and the city’s political culture of international justice and conflict mediation, as well as its cyber security industry. The project will relocate to Stroom in September 2018. In this iteration, Nøtel is upgraded with militarised architectural features and high-tech surveillance, referring to the billion-euro industry under the moniker of Hague Security Delta – a think-tank, consultancy and interest group connecting governments to commercial tech corporations, weapons manufacturers and cyber agencies – at once representing the official future vision for the region and remaining completely invisible in the city’s architecture.

The project continues Lek’s exploration of architectural visualisation as a means to explore the critical and aesthetic issues surrounding urban development. The installation enables visitors to reflect on how digital rendering can manipulate the public’s perception of space.

CEØ statement: “Nøtel Corporation is proud to present our first virtual reality advertisement for the Nøtel, our flagship range of zerø-star™* hotels that embody the concept of fully-automated luxury. Designed by world-leading architects to accommodate today’s global nomads, you can rest assured that your secrecy and security is of the utmost importance. Why not indulge in the intelligent sound system at the piano bar, or bathe in the glow of our thermal spa?”

www.arebyte.com/lawrence-lek

Location:
Java House, 7 Botanic Square, London City Island, E14 0LG

Times:
Tuesday – Saturday 12pm – 6pm

Price:
Free entry

Leelee Kimmel: Wormhole at Simon Lee until 30 August 2018

A solo exhibition by New York-based artist Leelee Kimmel, her first in the UK. In her latest work, Kimmel presents a series of large-scale abstract paintings that are confrontational in both colour and dimension, exploring themes of creation and destruction. The immersive element of her work is further developed through sculptural pieces and a five-minute Virtual Reality work that invites total submergence into the deep space of Kimmel’s creative world. 🤓

The large-format paintings feature graphic shapes clustered in thick multilayered pools of bright acrylic paint, which weave across fields of solid white or black. The paintings are imbued with a restless energy and freedom that is intrinsically linked with how the artist creates her works. The resulting compositions deliberately move in and out of representation, sensuous and strict, gloss and matte, tangled and full. The complex patch-work of imagery, consisting of crosshatch and opposing vector-like lines and patterns as well as interrupting biomorphic forms, has an otherworldly quality. Forceful and nervous lines are reminiscent of artists such as Basquiat and Twombly, while the uncanny worlds and dreamlike atmospheres created by the artist emerge into a sort of mutant realism.

A post shared by Leelee kimmel (@leeleekimmel) on

www.simonleegallery.com

Location:
Simon Lee, 12 Berkeley Street, London W1J 8DT

Times:
Monday – Saturday 10am – 6pm

Price:
Free entry

Katharina Grosse: Prototypes of Imagination at Gagosian until 27 July 2018

Widely known for her spectacular in situ paintings, in which explosive color is rendered directly onto architecture, interiors, and landscapes, Grosse embraces the events and incidents that arise as she works, opening up surfaces and spaces to the countless perceptual possibilities of the medium. Approaching painting as an experience in immersive subjectivity, she uses a spray gun, distancing the artistic act from the hand, and stylizing gesture as a propulsive mark. 🎨

In Prototypes of Imagination, Grosse reveals the ways in which painting catalyzes the unfolding of multiple dimensions on a single surface. Following Wunderbild, the imposing processional installation at the National Gallery in Prague, at the center of the exhibition is a single painting of oceanic scale on loose cloth. Working on huge expanses of flat cloth enables Grosse to execute very large-scale works in the studio in response to specific architectural conditions beyond it, in this case the Britannia Street gallery. This new approach creates a bridge between the studio canvases and the in situ paintings that she has been making over the last decade. In this abstract phantasmagoria, with its aqueous layers of vibrant, pulsating color, Grosse’s painterly gestures, and the inverted chromatic zones arising from her use of stencils of vaguely biomorphic form, assert entirely new spatial and temporal transformations.

Grosse continues this approach in works on stretched canvas, many of which contain rectangular fields that slide and tessellate like the windows and tabs of a browser, or dissolve into each other, creating ghostly organic silhouettes. Spatial tensions rise through shifts in chromatic temperature, and with stencils, folds, and other tools she allows for new patterns to emerge. Using stencils to either filter or completely block out areas of negative space, she creates opaque fields to be interrupted by solid geometries and ambiguous transparencies. The result sometimes recalls photograms wherein individual objects are placed on photosensitive paper to produce images using light alone. Here, paint replaces light, as Grosse saturates the exposed fabric with blazing, spectral mists. Each composition bears intimate traces of its creation, such as the smudges of paint where a stencil has been removed, or showers of drips suddenly severed in their resistance to gravitational pull. Surpassing the limits of pictorial logic, Grosse’s paintings are paradigms of vision; just as forms seem to materialize, their edges effervesce, pulling the viewer into their kaleidoscopic force field.

www.gagosian.com

Location:
Gagosian, 6-24 Britannia Street, London WC1X 9JD

Times:
Tue – Sat 10am – 6pm

Price:
Free entry

True Colours – Helen Beard / Sadie Laska / Boo Saville at Newport Street Gallery until 9 September 2018

Bringing together three emerging artists – Helen Beard (b.1971, Birmingham), Sadie Laska (b.1974, West Virginia) and Boo Saville (b.1980, Norwich) – that, despite using paint in very different ways, all share an interest in exploring the possibilities of colour. Featuring over fifty works, the show is the largest exhibition to date for each artist.

Helen Beard uses a vivid rainbow palette to create interlocking arrangements of bright primary colour, which combine to describe explicit sexual encounters. Working from found images, Beard’s work explores themes relating to gender, sexual psychology and eroticism. Situated part way between abstraction and representation, her figures are reduced to concisely defined fields of vibrant colour, on which a myriad of varied brush marks remain visible. Including a number of new works, one of which is a monumental diptych (The Mirror, 2018), each canvas measuring 3226 x 2743mm, the exhibition spans eight years of Beard’s practice.

New York-based artist Sadie Laska creates dreamlike compositions using paint and collage. Evoking the rebellious post-Pop aesthetic of New York, Laska often incorporates recycled waste materials and found objects into her paintings, sometimes reworking parts of earlier canvases entirely. In Untitled (Pepsi Shape), 2017, the canvas is carved up into contrasting areas, which are roughly painted with acrylic. The resulting amorphous shape evokes the distinctive colours of a can of Pepsi. A member of the underground drum-based band I.U.D., Laska’s paintings are filled with a similar improvised expressiveness and irreverent spirit of performance as her music.

The exhibition features a new series of Boo Saville’s colour field paintings, which are shown in dialogue with a number of black and white canvases. Known formerly for her figurative works in oil on canvas, as well as using everyday materials including biro and bleach, Saville has – since 2014 – been producing large-scale abstracts, made up of flawlessly gradating shades. Saville, whose work investigates mortality, applies up to forty layers of paint to achieve this extraordinary effect, erasing any suggestion of her own mark-making in spite of the emotional tenor of the works. The colour fields are inextricably linked to her black and white canvases, the subjects of the latter – sparingly painted so as to retain the appearance of the canvas weave – resulting from internet searches that occur to her whilst working on the abstracts. She notes: “The black and white paintings are purely about the surface of momentary thought and the colour fields are about the depth and vault of emotion and memory layered on top of each other.

www.newportstreetgallery.com/exhibition/true-colours-helen-beard-sadie-laska-boo-saville

Location:
Newport Street Gallery, Newport Street, London SE11 6AJ

Times:
Tuesday - Sunday 10am - 6pm

Price:
Free entry

Inside Arc at Fashion Space Gallery until 28 July 2018

Archives are usually repositories of objects, not intended for further use, rarely displayed in static exhibitions or museum cases. 👗 👘 👚

The Arc is a working archive, consisting of garments, accessories and other paraphernalia amassed by designer Jennefer Osterhoudt. Many items are by John Galliano and Alexander McQueen, with whom she worked very closely from the beginning of their careers and throughout their time at Givenchy, as an accessories designer in Paris during the 1990s. Created by stylist Nick Royal, this constantly expanding collection is regularly frequented by established designers and stylists who use it for editorial photoshoots and campaigns.

This exhibition highlights the eccentricities and rarities from this archive, pieces that as much embody the processes behind creating elaborate toiles in expensive fabrics as reveal complex and labour-intensive techniques used by high fashion. Various personal items sit aside rare handmade invitations, crafted prototypes and toiles that made it into production and select examples are shown alongside a wall of photographs of her own vast shoe collection.

Showcasing these pieces reveals that an archive can be as much about preserving objects for posterity but as a resource to inform future image-makers as they reinterpret ideas from the not-so-distant past.

www.fashionspacegallery.com/exhibition/inside-arc

Location:
Fashion Space Gallery, London College of Fashion, 20 John Princes Street, London W1G 0BJ

Times:
Monday – Friday 10am – 6pm
Saturday 12pm – 4pm (during term time)
Sunday closed

Price:
Free entry

Shape of Light: 100 Years of Photography and Abstract Art at Tate Modern until 14 October 2018

For the first time, Tate Modern tells the intertwined stories of photography and abstract art. 📷 🔳 🔲 ◼️

Shape of Light is the first major exhibition to explore the relationship between the two, spanning the century from the 1910s to the present day. It brings to life the innovation and originality of photographers over this period, and shows how they responded and contributed to the development of abstraction.

Key photographs are brought together from pioneers including Man Ray and Alfred Stieglitz, major contemporary artists such as Barbara Kasten and Thomas Ruff, right up to exciting new work by Antony Cairns, Maya Rochat and Daisuke Yokota, made especially for the exhibition.

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/shape-light

Location:
Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Times:
Sunday to Thursday 10.00 – 18.00
Friday to Saturday 10.00 – 22.00

Tickets:
£18 book online

426㎡ at StolenSpace Gallery until 29 April 2018

A group show featuring the creative talents from skateboarding and beyond. ‘426㎡’ will dissect and explore the ever present relationship between skateboarding and art, giving us an intimate look at it’s DIY nature. 🤟

There is little wonder why so many skateboarders make art. Both outlets serve similar purposes, they offer the access to freedom of expression and can both be solitary activities; the onus is on you to create, nobody else. ‘426㎡’ is a reflection of the community itself. The work conveys a diverse understanding of what it means to make art and how we as skateboarders don’t limit ourselves to any medium or subject matter. From Arran Gregory’s abstract use of geometry to Jon Horner’s playful characters, the art of skateboarding is as multifaceted as the culture that inspires it. ‘426㎡’ will display this diversity of creation in a two week exhibition, showcasing some of the most well respected artists and illustrators from skateboarding and beyond.

Contributing artists; Andrew Pommier, Arran Gregory, Artista, Ben Gore, Blondey McCoy, Chet Childress, D*Face, Darren John, Domas Glatkauskas, Ed Templeton, Eloise Dorr, Fos, Ged Wells, Glen Fox, Goldie, Gregory Conroy, Gaurab Thakali, Haroshi, Jack Pearce, James Jarvis, Jeremy Jones, Jon Horner, Liisa Chisholm, Lucas Beaufort, Luka Pinto, Mark Gonzales, Matthew Bromley, Nick Jensen, Oko, Pontus Alv, Rainyrainforest, Shepard Fairey, Will Sweeney, Zin V.

www.stolenspace.com/portfolio_page/llsb-426m2
www.llsbdonate.com

Location:
StolenSpace Gallery, 17 Osborn Street, London UK E1 6TD

Times:
Monday closed
Tuesday – Friday 11am – 7pm
Saturday – Sunday 11am – 6pm

Entry:
Free

John Chamberlain: ENTIRELYFEARLESS at Gagosian until 26 May 2018

Chamberlain’s distinctive metal sculptures, often made of crushed and torqued automobile steel, reveal both the stately grace and the expressive plasticity of industrial materials. Exploring the interplay of color, sheen, weight, and balance, Chamberlain taps into the dynamic energy of Abstract Expressionism, the pre-manufactured elements of Pop and Minimalism, and the provocative curves and swells of high baroque. 🚗

In this exhibition, large-scale floor sculptures and wall-mounted works made over the course of four decades attest to the seemingly infinite variations of shape and color that Chamberlain explored throughout his career.

The centerpiece, ENTIRELYFEARLESS (2009), towers over the viewer, its scrunched red sides bracketed by car bumpers in shiny silver chrome. As fluid as folded drapery, and arresting as a marble monument, it subverts expectations of both abstraction and representation, while exuding a subtle figural quality. In BISHOPBUDD (2009), a nest of twisted metal strips sits atop a huddle of larger contorted planes of black and white steel—the robust, doming form recalling both an elegant tree and a menacing mushroom cloud. Chamberlain fostered a keen appreciation for poetry during the year he spent at Black Mountain College in 1955, and began to consider language as an integral part of his aesthetic approach. His dynamic titles—usually in all caps without spacing—often act as semiotic echoes of the sculptures themselves.

www.gagosian.com/exhibitions/john-chamberlain

Location:
Gagosian, 17–19 Davies Street, London W1K 3DE

Times:
Tuesday – Saturday 10am – 6pm

Price:
Free entry

Fred Wilson: Afro Kismet at Pace Gallery until 27 April 2018

An exhibition featuring the artist’s most recent body of work originally produced for the 15th Istanbul Biennial in the autumn of 2017. The exhibition will be Wilson’s first at Pace London. On the occasion of Afro Kismet, Pace will publish a catalogue that will include an introduction by artist duo and Istanbul Biennial curators Elmgreen & Dragset, an essay by the Biennial’s Director Bige Örer, and an interview with the artist conducted by American novelist, playwright and essayist Darryl Pinckney. 👀

The genesis of the exhibition stretches back to 1992 when Wilson presented Re:Claiming Egypt, at the 4th International Cairo Biennale and to 2003 when Wilson represented the United States at the 50th Venice Biennale with Speak of Me as I Am. Wilson’s interest in Istanbul had been piqued for a long time; he conceived of the city as the third leg in a historically and culturally connected eastern Mediterranean triangle which also included Cairo and Venice. Through his research, Wilson developed a conceptual basis for the Istanbul project in which he contextualized pieces from the city’s Pera Museum’s Orientalist collection with new and existing works of his own. “My work is about an issue which is both personal and universal. […] A new meaning emerges from the coming together of art and history […] bring[ing] a fresh perspective to things we are used to seeing in museums. You can say that I tell a history which is not adequately discussed…” Fred Wilson, 2017.

For Pace, Wilson will reconfigure Afro Kismet which includes two chandeliers, two monumental Iznik tile walls, four black glass drip works, and a globe sculpture, as well as installations and vitrine pieces that gather cowrie shells, engravings, photographs, a Yoruba mask, and furniture, among other objects that the artist discovered in his frequent trips to Istanbul throughout 2016 and 2017. Since Venice Biennale in 2003, Wilson’s Murano glass chandeliers, with their shifts in scale, color, and complexity, have become vehicles for the artist’s meditations on blackness, death, and beauty. New chandeliers, included in the exhibition, combine black Murano glass with traditional metal and glass elements of Ottoman chandeliers, thus fusing two histories of craftsmanship and symbolizing the complex relationship between the Venetian and Ottoman Empires.

Throughout the exhibition, Wilson utilizes alluring materials—from richly coloured tiles walls to luminescent glass—to represent and investigate the long-ignored presence of communities of African descent in Turkey. In the two Iznik tile walls, the Arabic calligraphy translates in one case to “Mother Africa” and in the other “Black is Beautiful”. The new globe sculpture titled “Trade Winds” refers not to its original meaning, related to weather patterns, but to the complex and tragic global trade in human beings. The juxtaposition of recent works by Wilson with works from the 19th century – including Orientalist paintings with African subject matter by Alfred De Dreux and William James Müller – not only questions notions of universal knowledge and truth, but also sheds light on a history not thoroughly examined. By combining contemporary objects and museum-quality artefacts, Wilson challenges the assumptions of exhibition methodology and art historical scholarship.

www.pacegallery.com/exhibitions/12917/afro-kismet

Location:
Pace Gallery, 6 Burlington Gardens, London W1S 3ET

Times:
Tuesday – Saturday 10am – 6pm

Entry:
Free

The Other Art Fair: presented by Saatchi Art at Victoria House until 25 March 2018

UK’s favourite fair to meet and buy art direct from the very best emerging and undiscovered artists. Presenting 130 of the best emerging artists handpicked by a committee of art industry experts. 👩‍🎨 🎨 🖌

Celebrated for its unique visitor experience, The Other Art Fair’s Spring London edition will continue to delight and inspire art lovers with a tightly curated and distinctive programme of fair features that will create a platform for the ‘unexpected’ at the fair.

RSVP on Facebook

www.theotherartfair.com

Location:
Victoria House, Southampton Row, London WC1A 2QP

Times:
Saturday 11am – 7pm
Sunday 11am – 6pm

Price:
From £8 book online

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