Tag: cool exhibitions (page 1 of 2)

Game Changers: another way to play @ Somerset House / until 7th May 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Mon, Tue, Sat & Sun 10.00-18.00 (last entry 17.00)
Wed–Fri 11.00-20.00 (last entry 19.00)

@ Somerset House,  Strand, London WC2R 1LA

Free entry!

www.somersethouse.org.uk/whats-on/game-changers

Discover how traditional forms of chess, billiards and mazes continue to influence designers making exciting new games today.

A timeline tracing how traditional forms of chess, billiards and mazes have evolved with a selection of contemporary examples – both physical and digital – will be on show for visitors to try, including:

Four regional variations of Orthogonal/Diagonal, Nova Jiang’s modified chess sets which showed at Now Play This in 2016. Inspired by traditional Bauhaus chess sets, the pieces’ physical shape indicates how they should move.

A playable installation of Zach Gage’s Really Bad Chess, a digital game that recreates chess with a random selection of pieces for each player.

  • Home Turf, by Ed Saperia, a distorted billiards table that combines the normal challenges of billiards with a deliberately difficult shape
  • INKS by State of Play, an on-screen game within a physical pinball-style environment – derived from more traditional forms of billiards and bagatelle
  • Maze, a challenging, two-player table-top maze game by sculptor Alexander Berchert

The Japanese House: Architecture and Life after 1945 @ Barbican Art Gallery / until 25th June 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Mon–Sat: 9am–11pm
Sun: 11am-11pm
Bank Holidays: 12 noon–11pm

@ Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS

Tickets: £14.50 book online

www.barbican.org.uk

Our homes and personalities are intrinsically linked but nowhere more so than in Japanese architecture, where the needs of a building’s residents inform its very construction. The Japanese House welcomes you inside the Moriyama House (2005), designed in Tokyo by Ryue Nishizawa (SANAA) and inhabited by Yasuo Moriyama, an enigmatic urban hermit.

Lose track of time weaving in and out of the house’s ten individual, fully-furnished rooms and maze-like gardens. Rabbit chairs, sliding libraries and an ‘outdoor’ cinema are just some of the details that make up Moriyama’s unusual domestic environment.

As well as the full-size recreation of the Moriyama House, the exhibition also features a fantastical and lovingly crafted Japanese teahouse and garden designed by Terunobu Fujimori, featuring traditional Japanese tea ceremonies throughout the exhibition run. Come and watch day turn to night in the gallery space as part of this full sensory experience.

The Japanese House is the centrepiece of the UK’s first major exhibition exploring Japanese domestic architecture from the end of the Second World War, a period which has consistently produced some of the most influential and ground-breaking examples of modern and contemporary design.

In the wake of the war, the widespread devastation of Tokyo and other Japanese cities brought an urgent need for new housing, and the single family house became the foremost site for architectural experimentation and debate. Since then, Japanese architects have used their designs to propose radical critiques of society and innovative solutions to changing lifestyles.

The Radical Eye: Modernist Photography from the Sir Elton John Collection @ Tate Modern / until 21st May 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Monday to Sunday 10.00–18.00
Friday to Saturday 10.00–22.00

@ Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: £15 book online

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/radical-eye-modernist-photography-sir-elton-john-collection

This is a once-in-a-lifetime chance to see one of the world’s greatest private collections of photography, drawn from the classic modernist period of the 1920s–50s. An incredible group of Man Ray portraits are exhibited together for the first time, having been brought together by Sir Elton John over the past twenty-five years, including portraits of Matisse, Picasso, and Breton.

With over 70 artists and nearly 150 rare vintage prints on show from seminal figures including Brassai, Imogen Cunningham, André Kertész, Dorothea Lange, Tina Modotti, and Aleksandr Rodchenko, this is a chance to take a peek inside Elton John’s home and delight in seeing such masterpieces of photography.

The American Dream: Pop to the Present @ British Museum / until 18th June 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10am – 5.30pm (Fri until 8.30pm)

@ British Museum, Great Russell Street, London WC1B 3DG

Tickets: £17.50 book online

Trace the creative momentum of a superpower in this major new exhibition.

The past six decades have been among the most dynamic and turbulent in US history, from JFK’s assassination, Apollo 11 and Vietnam to the AIDS crisis, racism and gender politics. Responding to the changing times, American artists produced prints unprecedented in their scale and ambition.

Starting with the explosion of pop art in the 1960s, the exhibition includes works by the most celebrated American artists. From Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg to Ed Ruscha, Kara Walker and Julie Mehretu – all boldly experimented with printmaking. Experience this extraordinary history through their eyes.

Taking inspiration from the world around them – billboard advertising, global politics, Hollywood and household objects – American artists created highly original prints to rival their paintings and sculptures. Printmaking brought their work to a much wider and more diverse audience.

The sheer inventiveness and technical ingenuity of their prints reflects America’s power and influence during this period. Many of these works also address the deep divisions in society that continue to resonate with us today – there are as many American dreams as there are Americans.

This exhibition presents the Museum’s outstanding collection of modern and contemporary American prints for the first time. These will be shown with important works from museums and private collections around the world.

teamLab: Transcending Boundaries @ Pace Gallery / until 11th March 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tues-Sat 11-4

@ PACE London, 6 Burlington Gardens, London W1S 3ET

Free entry, booking essential!

www.pacegallery.com
www.pacelondon.team-lab.net

Exploring the role of digital technology in transcending the physical and conceptual boundaries that exist between different artworks, with imagery from one work breaking free of the frame and entering the space of another.

The installations also dissolve distinctions between artwork and exhibition space, and involve the viewer through interactivity.

The largest room in the exhibition will include six works and feature Universe of Water Particles, Transcending Boundaries (2017), a virtual waterfall that extends beyond the gallery wall onto the floor, flowing through the exhibition space and around the feet of the viewer. It engages with the concept of Ultra Subjective Space, central to teamLab’s practice, referencing the non-perspectival depiction of space in premodern Japanese art and situating the viewer directly within the realm of the artwork.

Encompassing the second room, Dark Waves (2016) is a simulation of the movement of waves based on the behaviour of hundreds of thousands of water particles. The waves are created in a three-dimensional virtual space, expressing water as a living entity that immerses the viewer and suggests an intrinsic connection with nature.

In the last room, the darkened space is transformed by the presence of the viewer, which activates Flowers Bloom on People (2017). With the body as a canvas for the projections, flowers are in a process of continuous change—growing, decaying and scattering in direct response to the viewer’s movements.

William Kentridge: Thick Time @ Whitechapel Gallery / until 15th January 2017 ???

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Sun 11am–6pm (closed Mondays)

@ Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High Street, London E1 7QX

Tickets: £11.95 book online

www.whitechapelgallery.org/exhibitions/william-kentridge

South African artist William Kentridge (b.1955, Johannesburg) is renowned for his animated expressionist drawings and films exploring time, the history of colonialism and the aspirations and failures of revolutionary politics.

In this major exhibition of six large-scale installations by the artist, music and drama are ruptured by revolution, exile and scientific advancement.

Highlights include the film work Second-hand Reading (2013), installation O Sentimental Machine (2015) and The Refusal of Time (2012), an immersive work created with composer Philip Miller, projection designer Catherine Meyburgh, choreographer Dada Masilo, scientist Peter Galison and collaborators from around the world.

Daydreaming with Stanley Kubrick @ Somerset House / until 24th August 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10am-6pm (last admission 5pm)

@ Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 1LA

Tickets: £12.50 book online

www.somersethouse.org.uk/visual-arts/daydreaming-with-stanley-kubrick

A new exhibition, curated by Mo’Wax and UNKLE founder, artist and musician James Lavelle, featuring a host of contemporary artists, film makers and musicians showcasing works inspired by Stanley Kubrick.

Participating artists have been invited to respond to a film, scene, character or theme from the Kubrick archives, shining new perspectives onto the cinematic master’s lifework. James Lavelle is collaborating with contemporary musicians and composers to produce a soundtrack to some installations creating a multi-disciplinary experience for the visitor.

Pioneering conceptual artist Joseph Kosuth will create an installation of text from Kubrick’s films based on the language of Kubrick’s work, while Britain’s foremost political artist Peter Kennard will juxtapose images of characters set in the War Room of Dr Strangelove with present day leaders of nuclear states, in a statement about the renewal of Trident. Inspired by the Stargate sequence in 2001: A Space Odyssey, film maker Doug Foster will invite visitors to experience an endless, widescreen tunnel and referencing the same film, Mat Collishaw will make a spaceman’s helmet featuring otherworldly sights and sounds.

Doug Aitken will provide ‘Twilight’, a public pay phone bathed in a luminous glow, which will be reminiscent of the Dr Strangelove scene where Mandrake attempts to make a collect call to the President of the United States. Sarah Lucas will lend ‘Priapus’, a phallic sculpture suggestive of the iconic murder weapon in A Clockwork Orange.

The exhibition is supported by artist Christiane Kubrick, the director’s wife of 41 years, who will be exhibiting a painting and Jan Harlan, Kubrick’s Executive Producer for 28 years. It is additionally endorsed by Warner Bros. Pictures, who collaborated with Kubrick on all his films since 1971.

The exhibition is co-curated by James Putnam who was formerly founder curator of the British Museum’s Contemporary Arts and Cultures Programme and is currently Senior Research Fellow Exhibitions at University of the Arts, London (UAL) where the Stanley Kubrick archive is housed.

FOUND @ The Foundling Museum / until 4th Sep 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Tue-Sat 10-17
Sun 11-17
Mon closed

@ The Foundling Museum, 40 Brunswick Square, London WC1N 1AZ

Tickets: £10.25

www.foundlingmuseum.org.uk/events/found

Foundling Fellow Cornelia Parker has invited over sixty outstanding artists from a range of creative disciplines to respond to the theme of ‘found’, reflecting on the Museum’s heritage.

Combining new and existing work with found objects kept for their significance, this major exhibition unfolds throughout the Museum, interacting with historic works in the Collection and with each other. Parker’s inspiration has in part been taken from the Museum’s eighteenth-century tokens – small objects left by mothers with their babies as a means of identification should they ever return to the Foundling Hospital to claim their child.

Artists participating in FOUND include: Ron Arad RA, Phyllida Barlow RA, Jarvis Cocker, Richard Deacon RA, Tacita Dean RA, Jeremy Deller, Edmund de Waal, Brian Eno, Antony Gormley RA, Mona Hatoum, Thomas Heatherwick RA, Christian Marclay, Mike Nelson, Laure Prouvost, David Shrigley, Bob and Roberta Smith RA, Wolfgang Tillmans RA, Marina Warner, Gillian Wearing RA and Rachel Whiteread. Twenty-two Royal Academicians have contributed to the show, echoing the role that the Foundling Hospital played in the development of the Royal Academy. Founded in 1739 to care for babies at risk of abandonment, the Foundling Hospital was supported by the leading artists of the day, many of whom donated work, thanks to the revolutionary involvement of the artist William Hogarth and the composer George Frideric Handel. The Royal Academy’s origins can be traced to the collective mobilisation of artists and the promotion of British art that took place at the Hospital during the eighteenth century.

The Great British Graphic Novel @ Cartoon Museum / 24th July 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Mon-Sat 10:30–17:30 (including Bank Holidays)
Sun 12:00–17:30

@ Cartoon Museum, 35 Little Russell Street, London WC1A 2HH

Tickets: £7

www.cartoonmuseum.org

An exhibition looking at the rise of the British Graphic novel with works by William Hogarth, Kate Charlesworth, Dave Gibbons, Martin Rowson, Posy Simmonds, Bryan and Mary Talbot and many others.

The Cartoon Museum is the only museum in the UK to celebrate our cartoon and comic heritage, from the 18th century to the present day. Four special exhibitions a year explore the work of cartoonists, graphic novelists and animators and themes found in cartoon artwork.

The two permanent displays tell the story of cartooning in all its forms, from the political satire of William Hogarth, Gerald Scarfe, Ralph Steadman and Steve Bell, to the social satire of H.M. Bateman and Pont, to the extraordinary works of William Heath Robinson and the fantastical comic strip creations like Dennis the Menace, Desperate Dan, Rupert Bear and Andy Capp.

Jeff Koons @ Newport Street Gallery / until 18th October 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Tuesday – Friday and Sunday 10am – 6pm
Saturday 10am – 10pm

@ Newport Street Gallery, Newport Street, London SE11 6AJ

Free entry

www.newportstreetgallery.com/exhibitions/current

www.jeffkoons.com

Jeff Koons is widely considered to be one of the most significant artists to have emerged in the postwar era. Since the late 1970s, his diverse work has explored themes pertaining to taste, consumerism, mass culture, beauty, acceptance, and the role of the artist.

‘Now’ is the first major UK exhibition to be devoted to the artist since ‘Jeff Koons: Popeye Series’, at the Serpentine Gallery in 2009. Spanning thirty-five years of the artist’s extraordinary career, ‘Now’ features over thirty paintings, works on paper and sculptures dating from 1979 to 2014. Drawn from Hirst’s collection, a number of these works have never before been shown in the UK.

Tracing the development of the artist’s radical reconfiguration of the readymade, the exhibition features one of Koons’s earliest works, Inflatable Flowers (Short White, Tall Purple) (1979), a vinyl blow-up flower displayed on a mirrored floor tile.

Signalling the conception of one of Koons’s most enduring themes – the inflatable – it is here presented alongside a number of his iconic Hoover sculptures. Part of The New series (1980–1983), the wall-mounted Hoovers – in which immaculate, unused household appliances are displayed in fluorescent-lit, acrylic boxes – date from Koons’s time working as a Wall Street commodities broker. Two of the Hoovers, which remain eternally pristine despite being outdated, were included in Koons’s first solo exhibition, at New York’s New Museum in 1980. Part of that installation – originally displayed in the museum’s storefront windows – has been reassembled for this exhibition. For the artist, the readymade, whether in the form of a child’s toy, Baroque sculpture or advertising billboard, provides “the most objective statement possible”.

Having begun his career focusing on the status of the object, ‘Now’ demonstrates how Koons quickly embarked on his lifelong investigation into the means by which objects are represented and communicated. With his sculptures cast in stainless steel, he returned to the inflatable; seductively replicating pre-existing objects in the gleaming, simulated opulence of the proletarian material. Employing cutting-edge technology, seemingly fragile, air-filled vinyl blow-ups and balloon animals are reproduced in stainless steel, sometimes rendered on the monumental scale of Balloon Monkey (Blue) (2006–2013), here exhibited in Newport Street’s double-height gallery. The reflective surfaces of these sculptures serve to “constantly remind viewers of their existence”, as Koons maintains, “it’s all about you”.

Koons’s enduring ability to delight, fascinate and provoke is evident throughout this broad survey. Employing easily-identified images, he explores social mobility in the Equilibrium Nike posters, the ways alcohol is advertised to different demographics in Luxury and Degradation, and the evocative imagery of childhood toys represented in Celebration. Whilst with his Made in Heaven series – erotic scenes involving the artist and his then-wife Ilona Staller (aka ‘La Cicciolina’) – he investigates the stigma and shame that inheres in contemporary conceptions of sexuality, succeeding in transforming the erotic into a study of: “the biological eternal… the preservation of life, the continuation of life”.

Summarised by curator and critic Norman Rosenthal as “manifestations of a joyful acceptance of American culture”, Koons’s work – which here fills Newport Street’s six, expansive galleries – challenges and teases in equal measure, reflecting as much on the profundities of our existence as the banalities of daily life.

The exhibition contains sexually explicit material.

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