Tag: cool exhibitions (page 1 of 2)

Videogames: Design/Play/Disrupt at V&A until 24 February 2019

This exhibition provides a unique insight into the design process behind a selection of groundbreaking contemporary videogames. Design work, including concept art and prototypes, feature alongside large-scale immersive installations and interactives. 🕹 👾

Exploring the medium since the mid-2000s, when major technological advancements, such as increased access to broadband, social media, smart phones and newly available means of making, profoundly changed the way videogames are designed, discussed and played. This change has opened the door to new voices and ideas, allowing the medium to break beyond its perceived boundaries and aspire to new horizons.

www.vam.ac.uk/exhibitions/videogames

Location:
Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A), Cromwell Road, London SW7 2RL

Times:
10am – 5:45pm (Fridays until 10pm)

Price:
£18 book online

Petra Cortright: Pale Coil Cold Angel at Nahmad Projects until 20 July 2018

Solo exhibition by Petra Cortright featuring works in 2D, 3D, and video. The artist presents stone sculptures for the first time in the form of three works carved from white Carrara marble, with a six-metre wide quadriptych being the largest painting by the artist to date. 🎨

A video installation is the latest in her “painting video” series. Cortright is a twenty-first century painter using contemporary tools. The Los Angeles-based artist is a celebrated member of a diffuse group known as “post internet” artists, who explore the effect of digital culture on the development of fine art.

After a series of critically acclaimed webcam performances distributed on YouTube, the artist consolidated her practice by using Photoshop to make paintings using brushes and images mined from internet search engines. Her use of platforms like Pinterest subverts traditionally gender normative content such as flowers and interiors, freeing this imagery into expansive digital landscapes.

The title of the show is also drawn from search terms used online. A final painting is a captured still from a master file that could be modified endlessly, so while her two-dimensional objects are static, they suggest dynamic change in reference to their source.

www.nahmadprojects.com/exhibition/pale-coil-cold-angel-petra-cortright

Location:
Nahmad Projects, 2 Cork Street, London W1S 3LB

Times:
10am – 6pm Monday – Friday

Price:
Free entry

Artist Rooms: Bruce Nauman at Tate Modern until 24 July 2018

Bruce Nauman’s interest is ‘in what art can be, not just what painting can be,’ and he embraced a variety of media, including sculpture, installation, video, neon and printmaking. 🔺 🔸 🔹 🔳 🔲

In the mid-1960s, having first studied mathematics and physics, and then art, Bruce Nauman became involved with the art scene in Los Angeles and San Francisco. Throughout his career, Nauman has investigated who we are, physically and mentally, using the human body and the space it inhabits. His own body became an important tool and reference point, whether performing in videos, or being cast to form part of a sculpture. Using self-imposed limitations and systems, he exposes the body’s vulnerability, as well as the human potential for violence and our need to communicate.

Words are both the subject and the form of many of Nauman’s works. Through thought-provoking wordplay, his neon pieces and works on paper cast new light on everyday phrases. Sound and the human voice are also significant aspects of his artistic approach, be it using his own voice or employing actors to perform unsettling and humorous scenarios. Disrupting the traditionally quiet space of the gallery, Nauman wants the experience of his work to be: ‘like getting hit in the face with a baseball bat. Or better, like getting hit in the back of the neck. You never see it coming; it just knocks you down.’

www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-modern/display/bruce-nauman

Location:
Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Times:
10am – 6pm Friday and Saturday until 10pm

Price:
Free entry

Beazley Designs of the Year at Design Museum until 28 January 2018

Explore the present and future of architecture, fashion, digital and more. Discover over 60 global projects which have been nominated for this year’s awards.

Now in its 10th year, the exhibition brings together over 60 global projects across six categories: Architecture, Digital, Fashion, Graphics, Product and Transport – featuring film, virtual reality, audio and objects representing the breadth and variety of this year’s designs.

See the original Pussyhat, symbolising women’s solidarity in protest of President Donald Trump’s sexist remarks and the Refugee Nation Flag, created to represent stateless athletes at the 2016 Rio Olympics. Be transported to 1920s France with the help of VR goggles, to explore rooms featuring furniture by Pierre Chareau, the great Art Deco architect.

Nominated by renowned academics, critics and designers, each project has been recognised for its outstanding contribution to design.

The public vote is now open. Explore each category below and cast your vote! A jury of industry experts will decide on the overall award winners in January 2018.

www.designmuseum.org/exhibitions/beazley-designs-of-the-year

Location:
Design Museum, 224-238 Kensington High Street, Kensington, London W8 6AG

Times:
10am – 6pm

Price:
£9 book online

Dalí / Duchamp at Royal Academy of Arts until 3 January 2018

Take another look at two artistic giants: father of conceptual art Marcel Duchamp, and larger-than-life Surrealist Salvador Dalí. This is the first exhibition to throw light on their surprising relationship and its influence on the work of both artists. 👨‍🎨 🎨

On the surface, these two great 20th-century artists could hardly be more dissimilar, but Dalí and Duchamp maintained a lasting bond of friendship and mutual admiration throughout their careers.

What fuelled this seemingly unlikely friendship was deeper than their shared artistic interests – amongst them eroticism, language, optics and games. More fundamentally, the two men were united by a combination of humour and scepticism which led both, in different ways, to challenge conventional views of art and life.

This original exhibition brings together around 80 works, including some of Dalí’s most inspired and technically accomplished paintings and sculptures, and Duchamp’s groundbreaking assemblages and readymades. It will also showcase the less familiar: photographs by Dalí, paintings by Duchamp, correspondence and collaborations between the two artists.

Presented as a conversation taking place through art, this focused exploration offers fresh ways of looking at two figures, radically revising their familiar places in art history. Through the lens of their intriguing friendship, visitors will gain a new perspective on two equally inventive, intelligent and irreverent minds. The exhibition is curated by Dawn Ades and William Jeffett, with Sarah Lea and Desiree de Chair.

www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/dali-duchamp

Location:
Royal Academy of Arts, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BD

Times:
Mon – Thu and Sat – Sun 10am – 6pm
Fri 10am – 10pm

Price:
From £15 book online

Game Changers: another way to play @ Somerset House / until 7th May 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Mon, Tue, Sat & Sun 10.00-18.00 (last entry 17.00)
Wed–Fri 11.00-20.00 (last entry 19.00)

@ Somerset House,  Strand, London WC2R 1LA

Free entry!

www.somersethouse.org.uk/whats-on/game-changers

Discover how traditional forms of chess, billiards and mazes continue to influence designers making exciting new games today.

A timeline tracing how traditional forms of chess, billiards and mazes have evolved with a selection of contemporary examples – both physical and digital – will be on show for visitors to try, including:

Four regional variations of Orthogonal/Diagonal, Nova Jiang’s modified chess sets which showed at Now Play This in 2016. Inspired by traditional Bauhaus chess sets, the pieces’ physical shape indicates how they should move.

A playable installation of Zach Gage’s Really Bad Chess, a digital game that recreates chess with a random selection of pieces for each player.

  • Home Turf, by Ed Saperia, a distorted billiards table that combines the normal challenges of billiards with a deliberately difficult shape
  • INKS by State of Play, an on-screen game within a physical pinball-style environment – derived from more traditional forms of billiards and bagatelle
  • Maze, a challenging, two-player table-top maze game by sculptor Alexander Berchert

The Japanese House: Architecture and Life after 1945 @ Barbican Art Gallery / until 25th June 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Mon–Sat: 9am–11pm
Sun: 11am-11pm
Bank Holidays: 12 noon–11pm

@ Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS

Tickets: £14.50 book online

www.barbican.org.uk

Our homes and personalities are intrinsically linked but nowhere more so than in Japanese architecture, where the needs of a building’s residents inform its very construction. The Japanese House welcomes you inside the Moriyama House (2005), designed in Tokyo by Ryue Nishizawa (SANAA) and inhabited by Yasuo Moriyama, an enigmatic urban hermit.

Lose track of time weaving in and out of the house’s ten individual, fully-furnished rooms and maze-like gardens. Rabbit chairs, sliding libraries and an ‘outdoor’ cinema are just some of the details that make up Moriyama’s unusual domestic environment.

As well as the full-size recreation of the Moriyama House, the exhibition also features a fantastical and lovingly crafted Japanese teahouse and garden designed by Terunobu Fujimori, featuring traditional Japanese tea ceremonies throughout the exhibition run. Come and watch day turn to night in the gallery space as part of this full sensory experience.

The Japanese House is the centrepiece of the UK’s first major exhibition exploring Japanese domestic architecture from the end of the Second World War, a period which has consistently produced some of the most influential and ground-breaking examples of modern and contemporary design.

In the wake of the war, the widespread devastation of Tokyo and other Japanese cities brought an urgent need for new housing, and the single family house became the foremost site for architectural experimentation and debate. Since then, Japanese architects have used their designs to propose radical critiques of society and innovative solutions to changing lifestyles.

The Radical Eye: Modernist Photography from the Sir Elton John Collection @ Tate Modern / until 21st May 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Monday to Sunday 10.00–18.00
Friday to Saturday 10.00–22.00

@ Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: £15 book online

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/radical-eye-modernist-photography-sir-elton-john-collection

This is a once-in-a-lifetime chance to see one of the world’s greatest private collections of photography, drawn from the classic modernist period of the 1920s–50s. An incredible group of Man Ray portraits are exhibited together for the first time, having been brought together by Sir Elton John over the past twenty-five years, including portraits of Matisse, Picasso, and Breton.

With over 70 artists and nearly 150 rare vintage prints on show from seminal figures including Brassai, Imogen Cunningham, André Kertész, Dorothea Lange, Tina Modotti, and Aleksandr Rodchenko, this is a chance to take a peek inside Elton John’s home and delight in seeing such masterpieces of photography.

The American Dream: Pop to the Present @ British Museum / until 18th June 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10am – 5.30pm (Fri until 8.30pm)

@ British Museum, Great Russell Street, London WC1B 3DG

Tickets: £17.50 book online

Trace the creative momentum of a superpower in this major new exhibition.

The past six decades have been among the most dynamic and turbulent in US history, from JFK’s assassination, Apollo 11 and Vietnam to the AIDS crisis, racism and gender politics. Responding to the changing times, American artists produced prints unprecedented in their scale and ambition.

Starting with the explosion of pop art in the 1960s, the exhibition includes works by the most celebrated American artists. From Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg to Ed Ruscha, Kara Walker and Julie Mehretu – all boldly experimented with printmaking. Experience this extraordinary history through their eyes.

Taking inspiration from the world around them – billboard advertising, global politics, Hollywood and household objects – American artists created highly original prints to rival their paintings and sculptures. Printmaking brought their work to a much wider and more diverse audience.

The sheer inventiveness and technical ingenuity of their prints reflects America’s power and influence during this period. Many of these works also address the deep divisions in society that continue to resonate with us today – there are as many American dreams as there are Americans.

This exhibition presents the Museum’s outstanding collection of modern and contemporary American prints for the first time. These will be shown with important works from museums and private collections around the world.

teamLab: Transcending Boundaries @ Pace Gallery / until 11th March 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tues-Sat 11-4

@ PACE London, 6 Burlington Gardens, London W1S 3ET

Free entry, booking essential!

www.pacegallery.com
www.pacelondon.team-lab.net

Exploring the role of digital technology in transcending the physical and conceptual boundaries that exist between different artworks, with imagery from one work breaking free of the frame and entering the space of another.

The installations also dissolve distinctions between artwork and exhibition space, and involve the viewer through interactivity.

The largest room in the exhibition will include six works and feature Universe of Water Particles, Transcending Boundaries (2017), a virtual waterfall that extends beyond the gallery wall onto the floor, flowing through the exhibition space and around the feet of the viewer. It engages with the concept of Ultra Subjective Space, central to teamLab’s practice, referencing the non-perspectival depiction of space in premodern Japanese art and situating the viewer directly within the realm of the artwork.

Encompassing the second room, Dark Waves (2016) is a simulation of the movement of waves based on the behaviour of hundreds of thousands of water particles. The waves are created in a three-dimensional virtual space, expressing water as a living entity that immerses the viewer and suggests an intrinsic connection with nature.

In the last room, the darkened space is transformed by the presence of the viewer, which activates Flowers Bloom on People (2017). With the body as a canvas for the projections, flowers are in a process of continuous change—growing, decaying and scattering in direct response to the viewer’s movements.

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