Tag: date ideas (page 1 of 9)

Flabbergast Theatre: Boris and Sergey’s Astonishing Freakatorium @ Wiltons Music Hall / 9th – 13th May 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
9th – 10th 7:30pm
11th – 13th 9pm

@ Wilton’s Music Hall, Graces Alley, London E1 8JB

Tickets: from £10.50 book online (20% off when you book to see Tatterdemalion on the same night)

www.flabbergasttheatre.co.uk
www.wiltons.org.uk/whatson/298-boris-sergey-s-astonishing-freakatorium

Created by War Horse, Blind Summit and Handspring puppeteer, Henry Maynard and his highly skilled team of expert puppeteers who have been working together in sweaty and physically compromising conditions since 2010, Boris and Sergey’s Astonishing Freakatorium is an improvised crossover cabaret featuring tabletop puppetry and character comedy for discerningly twisted adult audiences!

Following sell out runs at the Edinburgh and Adelaide Fringes and gathering three awards, 10 five star reviews (and counting), puppetry’s Balkan bad boys Boris & Sergey; simply the greatest vaudevillian double act ever conceived for the small stage, are back in London with freak show cabaret like no other.

Starring a variety of puppet characters, Boris & Sergey follow the tragic story of Pierre le Petit Tête Gustav and his wildly deranged tap dancing companion Juan Tamino. Audiences must hold on to their hats as they delve into a titillation filled world of the macabre. Boris & Sergey recreate traditional scenes of geeking, feats of incredible fortitude, endeavours of unimaginable physical endurance with formidable artistry, all whilst beguiling with their roughish wit and erudite jocularity.

The Little Orchestra present Eroica @ Oval Space / Friday 4th and Saturday 5th May 2017 🎶🎻

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 7pm (last admission 8pm, concert 8:30pm)

@ Oval Space, 29-32 The Oval, London E2 9DT

Tickets: from £15 book online

www.thelittleorchestra.com

A voyage of discovery of one of the all-time great symphonies, Beethoven’s era-defining Eroica. Forged as a powerful expression of the human and spiritual ideals he held close to his heart, Beethoven’s 3rd Symphony tells the story of the hero and his journey towards fulfillment.

Enter the transformed world of a heroically inspired Oval Space where you’ll greeted by the friendly team. Unwind from the stresses of your week; catch up with friends, enjoy a drink from the bar (including a delicious Eroica-inspired cocktail) and a bite to eat on the terrace; explore the space before getting comfortable for the concert, with drink in hand.

In an intimate and beautiful setting, on a comfy sofa if you feel like treating yourself and a friend, this is a wonderful opportunity to get close to the full sound of Beethoven’s orchestra and experience the struggle, anguish, and triumph of his epic portrayal of heroism through music. Nicholas, the conductor, will set the scene with his friendly introductions, sharing some of the stories and ideas behind the music.

After the final resounding chord of the symphony has died away, the bar reopens and the evening becomes social – a little party you are warmly invited to… To help set the mood, there will be some suitably cool live jazz, which we will be announcing nearer the time. Enjoy the atmosphere, relax with friends and meet the young, talented musicians who play in the orchestra, as well as Nicholas and the team.

Times:
7pm – Arrive and explore
8pm – Last admission to venue
8:30pm – The Concert: Eroica
9:45pm – Mix and mingle
12:00am – Carriages…

The Radical Eye: Modernist Photography from the Sir Elton John Collection @ Tate Modern / until 21st May 2017 📷

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Monday to Sunday 10.00–18.00
Friday to Saturday 10.00–22.00

@ Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: £15 book online

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/radical-eye-modernist-photography-sir-elton-john-collection

This is a once-in-a-lifetime chance to see one of the world’s greatest private collections of photography, drawn from the classic modernist period of the 1920s–50s. An incredible group of Man Ray portraits are exhibited together for the first time, having been brought together by Sir Elton John over the past twenty-five years, including portraits of Matisse, Picasso, and Breton.

With over 70 artists and nearly 150 rare vintage prints on show from seminal figures including Brassai, Imogen Cunningham, André Kertész, Dorothea Lange, Tina Modotti, and Aleksandr Rodchenko, this is a chance to take a peek inside Elton John’s home and delight in seeing such masterpieces of photography.

Eduardo Paolozzi @ Whitechapel Gallery / until 14th May 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Sun, 11am-6pm (Thu until 9pm)

@ Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High Street, London E1 7QX

Tickets: £11.95 book online

www.whitechapelgallery.org/exhibitions/eduardo-paolozzi

Exhibition about one of the most innovative and irreverent artists of the 20th century. Considered the ‘godfather of Pop Art’, his collages, sculptures and prints challenged artistic convention, from the 1950s through to the Swinging Sixties and advent of ‘Cool Britannia’ in the 1990s.

This major Eduardo Paolozzi retrospective spans five decades and features over 250 works; from the artist’s post-War bronzes, revolutionary screen-prints and collages, to his bold textiles and fashion designs.

Alongside Paolozzi’s early brutalist concrete sculptures, highlights include material from his groundbreaking performance lecture Bunk! (1952), his large-scale Whitworth Tapestry (1967) and the iconic sculpture Diana as an Engine (1963).

Jo Brocklehurst: Nobodies and Somebodies @ House of Illustration / until 14th May 2017 ✏️

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Sun, 10am-6pm

@ 2 Granary Square, King’s Cross, N1C 4BH

Tickets: £7.50 book online

www.houseofillustration.org.uk/whats-on/current-future-events/jo-brocklehurst-nobodies-and-somebodies

Drawing live in fetish clubs, punk squats and on the performance scene of 1970-90s London, Berlin and New York, Jo Brocklehurst’s artwork is a unique record of subculture.

Her figurative paintings from fetish clubs document experiments with sex, androgyny and couture that later inspired the mainstream fashion collections of Jean Paul Gaultier, while her best-known portraits from the 1980s offer a raw, beautiful and female perspective on punk.

Co-curated by her model and muse Isabelle Bricknall, the exhibition also features her drawings of Berlin’s 1990s performing arts scene for the Berliner Zeitung newspaper, alongside clubland-inspired interpretations of Alice Through the Looking Glass.

Ten Days Six Nights @ The Tanks – Tate Modern / from 24th March until 2nd April 2017 🌝🌚

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: various

@ Tate Modern, The Tanks, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: book online (free during normal day opening hours and charge for evening performances)

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/ten-days-six-nights

Ten Inspiring Days
Brining together an intergenerational selection of artists that have been invited to stage their work as a space that extends a form of hospitality or community, to other artists and visitors alike. The artists create images of networks and forms of participation that link natural environment with social media, organic and technological, human and non-human.

Isabel Lewis is in residence throughout the duration of the exhibition hosting a number of her signature occasions, combining music, food, drink and perfume to create an alternative environment for dance, discussions and invited musicians.

CAMP, a collaborative studio founded in Mumbai in 2007, use the Transformer Galleries as a space to share a selection of rarely-seen installations from the past 15 years that rework everyday circuits of electricity.

Wu Tsang and Fred Moten present Gravitational Feel, a sculptural performance using fabric and sound to explore the social and physical significance of touch and voice. Installations by Carlos Casas, Phill Niblock, and Lorenzo Senni exist as site-specific environments open to the public by day.

Fujiko Nakaya will transform the South Terrace for the first time with an immersive fog sculpture, animated by a light and soundscape made in collaboration with Nakaya’s historic collaborators: Ryuichi Sakamoto and Shiro Takatani; and host performances by renowned dancer and choreographer Min Tanaka.

Six unmissable nights
The daytime installations act as springboards for six nights of ticketed live performances. You can browse the full programme for each night below and book tickets online. The live nights will showcase both established and emerging artists working across performance, film, sound and dance.

The American Dream: Pop to the Present @ British Museum / until 18th June 2017 🇺🇸

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10am – 5.30pm (Fri until 8.30pm)

@ British Museum, Great Russell Street, London WC1B 3DG

Tickets: £17.50 book online

Trace the creative momentum of a superpower in this major new exhibition.

The past six decades have been among the most dynamic and turbulent in US history, from JFK’s assassination, Apollo 11 and Vietnam to the AIDS crisis, racism and gender politics. Responding to the changing times, American artists produced prints unprecedented in their scale and ambition.

Starting with the explosion of pop art in the 1960s, the exhibition includes works by the most celebrated American artists. From Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg to Ed Ruscha, Kara Walker and Julie Mehretu – all boldly experimented with printmaking. Experience this extraordinary history through their eyes.

Taking inspiration from the world around them – billboard advertising, global politics, Hollywood and household objects – American artists created highly original prints to rival their paintings and sculptures. Printmaking brought their work to a much wider and more diverse audience.

The sheer inventiveness and technical ingenuity of their prints reflects America’s power and influence during this period. Many of these works also address the deep divisions in society that continue to resonate with us today – there are as many American dreams as there are Americans.

This exhibition presents the Museum’s outstanding collection of modern and contemporary American prints for the first time. These will be shown with important works from museums and private collections around the world.

Bouchra Khalili @ Lisson Gallery / until 18th March 2017 🌎

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Monday–Friday, 10am–6pm
Saturday, 11am–5pm

@ Lisson Gallery, 67 Lisson Street, London NW1 5DA

Free entry

www.lissongallery.com/exhibitions/bouchra-khalili

First major solo exhibition in the United Kingdom by Moroccan-French artist Bouchra Khalili. Based between Berlin, Oslo and Paris, Khalili’s work explores the broad topics of migration and displacement through the mediums of film, video, installation, photography and prints. Largely inspired by the idea of journeys, both literally and conceptually, Khalili’s exhibition at Lisson Gallery lays bare the socially constructed nature of borders and challenges our fixed ideas of identity and nationhood.

Nowhere do the concepts of movement, identity and borders align more poignantly than in Khalili’s multi-channel video installation The Mapping Journey Project (2008–11). Aiming to draw an alternative practice of map-making, the work consists of eight films that focus the audience’s gaze on the tortuous and complex journeys taken by individuals forced to cross borders illegally. These journeys are literally traced onto a large map seen on screen, while the narrators recount the journey factually, vividly filling in the experiential details of their quests. In an essay for MoMA, New York, where the work was recently exhibited, Quinn Latimer notes that “the dark, pen-inked lines of [the migrants’] trajectories create strange and distinct constellations, fluid forms of statelessness that are posited against and over the more familiar coloured shapes and lines they cross – that patchwork of nation-states (colonial and other) that we have all learned to recognise like some international language of signs of the hegemonic world order”.

The abstract traces created in The Mapping Journey Project are realised further in Khalili’s The Constellation Series (2011). Composed of eight silkscreen prints, each of the Constellations translates the voyages recounted in the films into the form of star constellations similar to those that have been used in astronomy for centuries. Stripped of their borders and resisting containment, these journeys become fluid records of travels through space and time.

The final work in the exhibition, Foreign Office (2015), examines ideas of internationalism and solidarity. It is made up of a film, a series of photographs and a print. The work focuses on the city of Algiers and its position as an active site of revolution and anti-colonial movements between 1962-1972, with groups including the African National Congress (ANC) and Black Panthers having headquarters there during this period. Produced with the support of the Sam Art Prize, the film shows two young Algerians ‘re-writing’ history through images, language and oral narratives, while the accompanying series of photographs document the ghostly places that were home to these political movements, at once echoing the disappearance of utopia and its persistence to haunt the present-time.

Richard Wilson: Stealing Space @ Annely Juda Fine Art / 25th March 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Monday–Friday 10:00–18:00
Saturday 11:00–17:00

@ Annely Juda Fine Art, 4th Floor, 23 Dering Street, London W1S 1AW

Free entry

www.annelyjudafineart.co.uk

The artist’s first at the gallery and his first solo show in London since unveiling his major site-specific work, Slipstream, at Heathrow Airport’s Terminal 2. The exhibition features four new works, two of which are in direct response to the gallery’s internal and external architecture.

Works in this exhibition dominate the gallery’s space and stand, in places, above the height of the architectural beams. In the main room, Wilson has created a sculpture of a slice of the negative space or “space between” the hallway and staircase leading to the gallery’s main entrance. Partial details of a doorway, steps or a bannister in negative form are visible on the sculpture which sits straight on the ground at a tilted angle, offering a reassessment of the perhaps completely unnoticed yet familiar surroundings the viewer has just encountered. Block of Dering, meanwhile, takes the façade of the gallery building at 23 Dering Street and reconfigures it into a near-cube. Even the gallery’s signage can be made out in this sculpture which presents the local architecture in an entirely new way.

In the second room, a sculpture delineates the “space between” an area of Wilson’s home in South East London whilst Blocka Flats takes a piece of household furniture reconfigured into a form reminiscent of an urban landscape on a micro scale, the very same landscape which Wilson refers to in other works on a 1:1 scale. Two preparatory sketches for each work hang near their sculptural counterparts, whilst in the final room, Wilson shows maquettes of past works and those not yet realised.

Richard Wilson is a world-renowned British artist whose architectural interventions have won him acclaim throughout his career. Wilson rose to prominence in 1987 when his installation, 20:50 – consisting of a room filled to waist height with reflective sump oil – was shown at Matt’s Gallery in London and purchased by The Saatchi Gallery. Wilson has gone on to create a series of predominantly site-specific works, most recently Slipstream (2014), which stands at an impressive 78 meters at Heathrow Airport’s Terminal 2. Wilson was appointed visiting research professor at the University of East London in 2004, elected as a member of the Royal Academy in 2006 and in 2008 was awarded an honorary doctorate at the University of Middlesex. He has created permanent and temporary works at prominent locations worldwide and his works have been shown at institutions such as The Serpentine Gallery, London; Saatchi Gallery, London; The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; National Gallery of Australia, Canberra and Museu d’Art Contemporani, Barcelona.

“I need that initial thing from the real world because I’ve always been concerned with the way you can alter someone’s perception, knock their view off kilter. And to do that I need to start with something we think we understand.”

Richard Mosse: Incoming @ Barbican – The Curve / until 23rd April 2017 📷

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
The Curve
Sat–Wed 11am–8pm
Thu–Fri 11am–9pm

@ Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS

Free entry

www.barbican.org.uk

Barbican Art Gallery has invited conceptual documentary photographer and Deutsche Börse Photography Prize winner Richard Mosse to create an immersive multi-channel video installation in the Curve. In collaboration with composer Ben Frost and cinematographer Trevor Tweeten, Mosse has been working with an advanced new thermographic weapons and border imaging technology that can see beyond 30km, registering a heat signature of relative temperature difference. Classed as part of advanced weapons systems under International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), Mosse has been using this export controlled camera against its intended purpose, to create an artwork about the refugee crisis unfolding in the Aegean Sea, off the coast of Libya, in Syria, the Sahara, the Persian Gulf, and other locations.

Mosse is renowned for work that challenges documentary photography. In his recent work The Enclave (2013) – a six-channel installation commissioned by the Irish Pavilion for the 2013 Venice Biennale – Mosse employed a now discontinued 16mm colour infrared film called Kodak Aerochrome that transformed the green landscape of the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo into vivid hues of pink to create a surreal dreamscape. Questioning the ways in which war photography is constructed, Mosse’s representation of the ongoing armed conflict in eastern Congo advocates a new way of looking.

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