Tag: events (page 1 of 39)

A Spoonful of Sherman at Greenwich Theatre from 26 March until 30 March 2018

Singing and dancing through 100 years of Sherman Family music; and you already know all of the songs by heart! 😁 🎶

A compelling musical stage show for all the family, celebrating the life and music of multi award-winning Disney songwriters The Sherman Brothers (Mary Poppins, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, The Jungle Book, Winnie the Pooh), Tin Pan Alley songwriter Al Sherman (writer for artists including Frank Sinatra, Billie Holliday and Ella Fitzgerald), and present day composer, Robert J. Sherman. Come with us on a journey through the songbook of your childhood!

Hits include:
Let’s Go Fly A Kite!, It’s A Small World (After All), I Wanna Be Like You, The Ugly Bug Ball, Comes A-Long A-Love, You’re Sixteen, Feed The Birds, Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious, Hushabye Mountain, A Spoonful Of Sugar and more!

Have you booked your tickets for A Spoonful Of Sherman yet? Coming to Greenwich from 26-30 March, this smash hit show for all the family includes music from Oscar-winning #Disney songwriters The Sherman Brothers, Tin Pan Alley songwriter Al Sherman and present day composer Robert J. Sherman. . ★★★★★ SARDINES MAGAZINE (2018) ★★★★★ WEST END WILMA (2014) ★★★★ THE LADY (2018) ★★★★ THE TIMES (2014) ★★★★ WHATSONSTAGE (2014) . Including songs from MARY POPPINS, THE JUNGLE BOOK, CHITTY CHITTY BANG BANG, ARISTOCATS, WINNIE THE POOH and more! . #greenwichtheatre #greenwich #theatre #london #familytheatre #musical #musicaltheatre #disney #marypoppins #junglebook #sherman #shermanbrothers @royal_greenwich @visitgreenwich @greenwichlondon @greenwichcouk @visitlondonofficial

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Greenwich Theatre, Crooms Hill, London SE10 8ES


From £19.50 book online

Rhythm & Reaction: The Age of Jazz in Britain at Two Temple Place until 22 April 2018

Marking 100 years of jazz in the UK, the exhibition explores the impact that jazz had on Britons from 1918. 🎷

Jazz provoked reactions ranging from devotion to abhorrence when the idea, and then the sound, of the music first entered the consciousness of the British public in the aftermath of the First World War. Visiting American groups such as the Original Dixieland Jazz Band and the Southern Syncopated Orchestra offered Britons their first chance to experience the music live.

The exhibition highlights how the new jazz sound in post-War nightclubs and dancehalls provided exciting and dynamic material for British artists. Bold depictions of lively dancers by William Roberts and Frank Dobson, will be displayed alongside the Harlem-inspired paintings for which Edward Burra, one of Britain’s foremost Modernist painters, was well-known.

The growing interest in jazz brought black and white musicians, artists and audiences together, and was crucial in influencing changes in British society, moving from stereotypes descended from the minstrel show to a more nuanced understanding of and interest in African American and black British culture.

The exhibition brings together painting, prints, cartoons, textiles and ceramics, moving film, instruments and the all-important jazz sound, to explicitly examine the influence of jazz on British art, design and wider society.


Two Temple Place, London WC2R 3BD

Monday 10am – 4.30pm
Tuesday closed
Wednesday 10am – 9pm
Thursday 10am – 4.30pm
Friday 10am – 4.30pm
Saturday 10am – 4.30pm
Sunday 11am – 4.30pm

Free entry

OpenFest at Barbican from Saturday 17 – Sunday 18 March 2018

Barbican OpenFest is taking over the Centre and surrounding venues and a great place to get orientated and start your day is Level G of the Barbican Centre. There will be activities, events, pop up performances, free exhibitions and talks. 🎉 🎨 🎶

Take the whole family for a fun day out. You’ll find activities and workshops to keep everyone entertained and learning something new while adventuring around the centre and beyond.

Barbican OpenFest is a Culture Mile event in collaboration with The City of London Corporation, Guildhall School of Music & Drama, London Symphony Orchestra and the Museum of London. Culture Mile is a destination for culture and creativity in the heart of London’s financial district, bringing the area to life with imaginative collaborations and exciting events.

Lots of the festival is free and drop-in, but there are some events that need to be booked in advance. Plan in advance to find events and activities, both free and paid.


Barbican, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS

Mon-Sat 10am-8pm
Sun 11am-8pm

Find events, free and paid. Book online.

Crossroads: Kauffman, Judd and Morris at Sprüth Magers until 31 March 2018

The show presents six works from Kauffman’s fertile period of 1966—1971, when he addressed the issues of structure and form in painting, the use of industrial materials, painting’s relationship to the wall, and dematerialisation. His work is contextualised by the inclusion of the stack piece Untitled (Bernstein 80-4) (1980) and the floor piece Untitled, DSS 234 (1970) by Donald Judd and the two felt works Untitled (1968) and Fountain (1971) by Robert Morris, as well as supplemental materials from the Kauffman archives. The exhibition presents the three artists together for the first time in Europe, and is Kauffman’s debut exhibition with the gallery in London. 😍

Although primarily known as a Los Angeles based artist, Craig Kauffman had a long history of engagement with the New York scene. In 1967, Kauffman relocated to New York, encouraged by the successes of his recent exhibitions in the city. While there, he began a friendship with Donald Judd, the artist who coined the phrase “specific objects” to describe his own work, a format which operated between painting and sculpture. Like the work of Judd, Kauffman’s three-dimensional plastic paintings occupy this liminal category. Their volume suggests that they are sculpture, but their presence on the wall reinforces their status as paintings. The unity of colour and form, achieved through the use of industrial materials, is another point of similarity between the two artists’ objectives.

Kauffman’s move to New York also reignited his friendship with Robert Morris, whom he had met in San Francisco ten years earlier. Their frequent discussions resulted in a short lived collaboration for the exhibition Using Walls (Indoors) at the Jewish Museum in 1970, which remained open for only one day, and which Kauffman described as a combination of both of the artists’ ideas. Only a few years prior, Morris begun making process-oriented felt pieces, in which he hung strips of industrial felt on the wall and allowed gravity to determine their shape. This influenced Kauffman’s conception of his series of Loops, in which sheets of spray painted Plexiglas seem to casually droop over a wire.

In Kauffman’s work, the environment constantly shifts as the viewer moves around each object. The light that moves across the curved edges of each piece facilitates the full comprehension of their forms. This draws comparisons to Morris’s own textual formulations in his influential Notes on Sculpture series, which advocated a phenomenological reading of the art object, how they change under varying conditions of light and space. The coloured shadows of the hanging Loops and the cast plastic forms that project into space directly implicate both the viewer and their supports.

Two of the earliest works from 1966 demonstrate how Kauffman addressed some of the issues which were important to Minimalist art and theory: seriality, industrial multiples, and anonymity. But where the New Yorkers’ opted for material and formal austerity—Kauffman’s supple plastic works were coloured and full of curves.

This exhibition is curated by Frank Lloyd, and follows Craig Kauffman: Works from 1962 – 1964 in dialogue with Francis Picabia and Marcel Duchamp, Sprüth Magers debut of the gallery’s representation of the Estate of Craig Kauffman in Berlin in 2016. The show is timed to run concurrently with the gallery’s Los Angeles presentation of Robert Irwin, who, along with Kauffman, was a major force in the definition of art from Los Angeles in the 1960s.


Sprüth Magers, 7 Grafton Street, Mayfair, London W1S 4EJ

Tue-Sat 11am-6pm

Free entry

WOW: Women of the World at Southbank Centre until 11 March 2018

Celebrating women and girls, and looks at the obstacles that stop them from achieving their potential. 👭

Around the world, individuals and communities are insisting on the simple proposition that women and girls must have equal rights and asking the question: why is gender equality taking so long?

Southbank Centre’s WOW – Women of the World festival is a global network of festivals which provides a platform for celebrating what has been achieved, and exploring all the ways we can change the world for the better.

In the year that marks the 100th anniversary since some women got the vote in the UK, and when #MeToo shook the world, we bring together artists, writers, politicians, comedians, activists and more for the 8th annual WOW London at Southbank Centre.

Southbank Centre Artistic Director Jude Kelly launched WOW – Women of the World in 2010 to mark the centenary of International Women’s Day, as a major global festival that celebrates women and girls and looks at the obstacles they face, where hundreds of women’s stories could be shared, feelings vented, fun had, minds influenced and hearts expanded.

In response to an overwhelming demand Southbank Centre have been fostering a growing global network of festivals. Already in four other countries WOW is scheduled to spread to four more next year, and throughout the same across the UK.

The ethos of WOW is to create a festival for everyone. It is bold and broad-based in its approach, both lively and serious, and feeds the demand to discuss anything and everything. It brings people together from all corners of society – both speakers and audience members – energising and providing the inspiration and tools to make change.


Southbank Centre, Belvedere Road, London SE1 8XX



Cinema: Women on Film at House of Vans throughout March 2018

A whole month of films hosted in the 100 seat cinema. Celebrate Women’s month this March with a selection of kick-ass female leads! 🙋‍♀️

03/03/18 – La Via En Rose
09/03/18 – Tangerine
17/03/18 – The Help
18/03/18 – Persepolis
23/03/18 – Frida
24/03/18 – Million Dollar Baby
25/03/18 – Breakfast At Tiffany’s
30/03/18 – 20th Century Women
31/03/18 – Thelma & Louise
01/04/18 – Mustang


House of Vans, Arches 228-232, Station Approach Road, London SE1 8SW

Thu – Fri 5pm and 7pm
Sat – 3pm and 5:30pm
Sun – 2pm and 4pm

Free entry! First come first served

Mark Dion: Theatre of the Natural World at Whitechapel Gallery until 13 May 2018

Explorer, collector, activist and conjuror of theatrical environments American artist Mark Dion (b.1961) has travelled through rainforests and rubbish dumps to reveal the wonder and fragility of life on earth. Dion uses specimens – natural and manmade – to make uncanny representations of these environments. His drawings, sculptures and installations draw on the techniques of scientific enquiry and museum display; and on the telling of natural histories. 🌎

We embark on a journey through a sequence of installations created between 2000 and the present. The exhibition begins with The Library for the Birds of London (2018), a new commission continuing a series of aviaries Dion has created since 1993. The roomy sanctuary is a temporary home to 22 zebra finches, which are well-known for being social creatures. Visitors are invited into the aviary, which has an apple tree at its centre, referencing the tree of life. Over 600 books devoted to ornithology, environmentalism, literature and the natural sciences surround the birds. A scholar’s study invites us to unravel intricate drawings and models; while the Bureau for the Centre of the Study for Surrealism and its Legacy displays the strange magic of obsolete things. The muddy banks of the Thames have also yielded their treasures for poetic display in a gigantic cabinet; while The Wonder Workshop displays the ghosts of animals and instruments, many of them extinct and obsolescent. Each immersive environment is also a habitat, evoking the characters that observe, conserve or exploit the natural world.


Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High Street, London E1 7QX

Monday closed
Tuesday 11am-6pm
Wednesday 11am-6pm
Thursday 11am-9pm
Friday 11am-6pm
Saturday 11am-6pm
Sunday 11am-6pm

£12.95 book online

Andreas Gursky at Hayward Gallery until 22 April 2018

Hayward Gallery reopens with the first major UK retrospective of the work of acclaimed German photographer Andreas Gursky. Known for his large-scale, often spectacular pictures that portray emblematic sites and scenes of the global economy and contemporary life, he is widely regarded as one of the most significant photographers of our time. 📷

Driven by an interest and insight into ‘the way that the world is constituted’, as well as what he describes as ‘the pure joy of seeing’, Gursky makes photographs that are not just depictions of places or situations, but reflections on the nature of image-making and the limits of human perception. Often taken from a high vantage point, these images make use of a ‘democratic’ perspective that gives equal importance to all elements of his highly detailed scenes.


Hayward Gallery Southbank Centre, Belvedere Road, London SE1 8XX

11am – 7pm
Closed Tuesdays
Thursdays until 9pm

£16 book online

Eddie Peake: Concrete Pitch at White Cube Bermondsey until 8 April 2018

Featuring new sculpture, painting, sound work and performance presented in an immersive and constructed environment. 🔊 🏙

The works weave autobiographical elements and an examination of self-identity with more general themes of desire, the body, architecture and urban landscape. The title ‘Concrete Pitch’ was inspired by the bare, concrete recreation ground in Finsbury Park in London where Peake grew up, which was used as a playground, a sports field, a meeting place for people of every age, class and ethnicity and location for encounters and scenarios of all kinds. Peake has said: ‘I used to treat things I did like graffiti and football and dance classes as not part of my art, then I had a sort of epiphany. I realised I want all those parts of my life in my art, and vice versa.’ For Peake, whose work can be located within a history of painting and object-making as well as more recent narratives of dance and performance art, the gallery can also be considered a stage; a place to orchestrate dramas of the everyday and to present the rich associative portrait of his childhood neighbourhood as a microcosm of urban, multicultural society.

Peake will be present in the gallery space throughout the exhibition, following a scheduled daily routine. Moving between various constructed spaces which include a private office and a triangular cell-like structure, accessible only by a tall ladder. The artist ‘plays’ himself, both offering up and dismantling the narrative of artistic ego, fictional protagonist and ‘real’ self. In another specially constructed room, visible behind a window, DJs from Kool London broadcast an online radio show during the exhibition. Broadcasting oldskool jungle and drum and bass from East London tower blocks since 1991, Kool FM is one of the longest running underground stations and provided the soundtrack to Peake’s adolescence.

The new, large-scale sound installation, Stroud Green Road runs through the gallery, consisting of a row of steel tables placed in a snaking line, just as the street of the same name runs through Peake’s neighbourhood. On their tray-like surfaces is an array of objects: small-scale sculptures as well as an eclectic selection of items purchased from shops on Stroud Green Road and several small speakers which emit a low, deep register like a wavering vibration or rattle. Composed by the artist using distorted samples and field recordings from the local area, this abstract soundscape creates a continuously looping hum, while a soft pink light floods the exhibition space. Continuing the theme of revealing and concealing, an airy white curtain hangs full-length from the ceiling, creating a natural spiralling passageway, in the centre of which a split-screen projection shows four dancers, each locked in an individual, looping sequence of complex, choreographed movement. The notion of the loop, a key motif within Peake’s work, is manifested in these repetitive movements, in the daily rituals the artist will be observing, in the sonic structure of the sound sculpture and in the music played by the Kool DJs. For Peake, these devices echo the entrapping loops of thought or behaviour associated with compulsion, obsession and depression.

In several new series of paintings, techniques of layering and masking are used to create vivid abstract compositions on canvas or hard, reflective stainless-steel panels. In one group, overlapping, spray-painted rectangles recall the urban patchwork of fly-posters, while in others, graffiti-like mark-making recedes into a bright void. This exploration of the void, whereby elements of the composition are left blank or undone creates works that reflect back to the viewer a sense ennui, even depression. In another group of oil on canvas works, a rainbow-coloured text defines the form of a head in profile spelling out the enigmatic slogans ‘A More Uncomfortable And Realistic History’, and ‘We To The Ramp Go For Relinquish Unearned Privileges And Powers’. Suggesting the direct, angry tone of graffiti, social media and urban music, these works are an expression of ideas that have formerly been implicit in Peake’s work.


White Cube Bermondsey, 144 – 152 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ

Tuesday – Saturday 10am – 6pm
Sunday 12pm – 6pm

Free entry

Future of Dating: Friday Late at V&A on Friday 23 February 2018

The original contemporary late night event. Friday Late celebrates all aspects of contemporary visual culture and design in society, bringing audiences face-to-face with leading and emerging artists and designers through live performance, film, installation, debate, DJs and late-night exhibition openings.

With dating apps ever increasing, finding love is now as much about an algorithm as physical attraction. Join us this Friday Late to swipe, like, and explore the future of dating. What role do data and technology play, and what is at stake in terms of chemistry, privacy and who knows our preferences best? Look at the politics of sex and relationships, and question how we build and sustain them today and into the future. Watch out cupid! 💕


Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A), Cromwell Road, London SW7 2RL

6:30pm – 10pm

Free, make sure you arrive early!

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