Tag: exhibition (page 1 of 22)

Friday Late: Hack. Make. Create. @ V&A / Friday 28th July 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 18.30-22.00

@ V&A, Cromwell Road, Knightsbridge, London SW7 2RL

Free entry

www.vam.ac.uk/info/friday-late

The original contemporary late night event. Friday Late celebrates all aspects of contemporary visual culture and design in society, bringing audiences face-to-face with leading and emerging artists and designers through live performance, film, installation, debate, DJs and late-night exhibition openings.

More than the hobbyists’ pursuit, maker communities are disrupting manufacturing. Shared spaces offer a new amalgam of craft, industry and technology, where both tools and knowledge are pooled. Join London’s maker spaces to resist mass production and uncover how hacked machines and open source design are changing the way we make and live. Explore production process and question whether this a sustainable movement?

RSVP on Facebook.

Postponed Futures @ Gallery for Russian Arts and Design / until 24 June 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Fri 11am-7pm (Sat 5pm)

@ GRAD (Gallery for Russian Arts and Design), 3-4A Little Portland Street, London W1W 7JB

Free entry

www.grad-london.com

An exhibition that offers an alternative perspective on early twentieth century Ukrainian avantgarde practices through the lens of contemporary Ukrainian art.

Curated by Kiev-based artist Nikita Kadan, the exhibition includes historical works by twentieth century masters Oleksandr Bohomazov, Vasyl Ermilov, Maria Synyakova and Oleksandr Khvostenko-Khvostov, alongside collages by Lada Nakonechna, a film by Mykola Ridnyi and a sculpture by Nikita Kadan, inspired by ‘Monument to three Revolutions’ by Vasyl Ermilov.

Late Shift: Drop-in Drawing: He to She @ National Portrait Gallery (NPG) / Thursday and Fridays

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 18:00

@ National Portrait Gallery (NPG), St Martin’s Place, London WC2H 0HE (Meet in Room 22, Floor 1)

Free entry

www.npg.org.uk/whatson/lateshift/whats-on-late-shift

To celebrate International Women’s Day and HeForShe Arts Week, join artist Robin-Lee Hall to re-imagine what the Gallery’s Victorian Collection might have looked like if women had been afforded the same opportunities as their male counterparts and their achievements recorded in portraiture.

Consider questions of gender identity and representation in your drawings and set about redressing the balance. At 20.15 you will get the opportunity to put your work out and Robin with conduct a friendly Friday critique.

There is a short introduction at 18.30 but feel free to drop in whenever you like. You can stay for 10 minutes or 2 hours. The class is suitable for everyone from complete beginners to accomplished artists.

All materials are provided, so no need to bring anything with you unless you want to work in your own sketchbook or on an iPad.

Every Friday there is a free drop-in drawing activity happening in the Gallery.

Also happening:

Live Music: Luca Luciano and Jose Henrique de Campos
Room 20, Floor 2
Music for clarinet and guitar by Villa-Lobos, Berio, De Falla and Poulenc

Richard Mosse: Incoming @ Barbican – The Curve / until 23rd April 2017 ?

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
The Curve
Sat–Wed 11am–8pm
Thu–Fri 11am–9pm

@ Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS

Free entry

www.barbican.org.uk

Barbican Art Gallery has invited conceptual documentary photographer and Deutsche Börse Photography Prize winner Richard Mosse to create an immersive multi-channel video installation in the Curve. In collaboration with composer Ben Frost and cinematographer Trevor Tweeten, Mosse has been working with an advanced new thermographic weapons and border imaging technology that can see beyond 30km, registering a heat signature of relative temperature difference. Classed as part of advanced weapons systems under International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), Mosse has been using this export controlled camera against its intended purpose, to create an artwork about the refugee crisis unfolding in the Aegean Sea, off the coast of Libya, in Syria, the Sahara, the Persian Gulf, and other locations.

Mosse is renowned for work that challenges documentary photography. In his recent work The Enclave (2013) – a six-channel installation commissioned by the Irish Pavilion for the 2013 Venice Biennale – Mosse employed a now discontinued 16mm colour infrared film called Kodak Aerochrome that transformed the green landscape of the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo into vivid hues of pink to create a surreal dreamscape. Questioning the ways in which war photography is constructed, Mosse’s representation of the ongoing armed conflict in eastern Congo advocates a new way of looking.

Game Plan: Board Games Rediscovered @ V&A Museum of Childhood / until 23rd April 2017 ?

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10.00-17.45

@ V&A Museum of Childhood, Cambridge Heath Road, London E2 9PA

Free entry

www.vam.ac.uk/moc/exhibitions/gameplan

Are you a Scrabble Champion? A wannabee Chess grandmaster? Or a Monopoly megalomaniac?

Celebrating the joy, excitement and occasional frustration of playing board games. This exhibition includes some of the most iconic, enthralling and visually striking games from the V&A’s outstanding national collection of board games. Alongside current family favourites such as Cluedo and Trivial Pursuit, and traditional games like chess, the exhibition will look at historical board games including The Game of the Goose and other beautifully designed games from the 18th and 19th centuries.

Intrigue: James Ensor by Luc Tuymans @ Royal Academy of Arts / until 29th January 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Sat-Thu 10am-6pm
Fri 10am-10pm

@ Royal Academy of Arts, The Sackler Wing, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BD

Tickets: £10.50 book online

www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/james-ensor-luc-tuymans

Despite spending his whole professional life in the Belgian seaside town of Ostend, James Ensor was very successful in his lifetime and exerted considerable influence on the development of Expressionism. An innovator and an outsider, he rebelled against the conservative art teachings of the late 19th century academy in Brussels, drawn instead to the avant-garde salons where his radical creative vision could thrive.

Ensor’s childhood spent among the fantastical treasures of his family’s curiosity shop offers a clue as to how the seeds of this wild imagination were sown. The imagery of masks and carnivals runs through much of his work, from vibrant colours and flamboyant costumes to an ever-present sense of drama and satire.

We invited the artist Luc Tuymans, a fellow Belgian and admirer of Ensor, to curate this unique exhibition. Taking a personal view, Tuymans looks back at Ensor’s singular career through a selection of his most bizarrely brilliant and gloriously surreal creations.

Red Bull Studio Collectives @ Hoxton Gallery, DreamBagsJaguarShoes and No. 90 / from 28th January – 13th March 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: various

@
Hoxton Gallery, 59 Old Street, London EC1V 9HX

DreamBagsJaguarShoes, 32-34 Kingsland Road, London E2 8DA

No. 90, Main Yard, Wallis Road, London E9 5LN

Free entry

www.redbullstudios.com

Red Bull Studio Collectives series launches with a focus on bringing artists together in a cross-disciplinary project. Collectives sees artists select a young collaborator to work with and, combining creative minds both emerging and established, together they are challenged to create unique and exciting pieces of art that push limitations and provoke viewers. Based across three east London locations with one-of-a-kind collaborative installations for you to experience.

Leif Podhajsky and Eva Papamargariti @ Hoxton Gallery
(28th January – 8th February)

Combining their common interests, Leif and Eva are using their partnership to explore the individualism of interpretation in relation to visual language. Pursuing a symbiosis between Eva’s digital techniques and Podhaisky’s trademark patterns; “The Language of dreams” explores the meaning of a visual language, bringing to life thoughts, ideas and dreams through visual manifestations.

Alice Dunseath and Matteo Mastrandrea @ DreamBagsJaguarShoes
(28th January – 13th March)
Expanding on their own individual projects, Matteo and Alice have drawn influence from Object Oriented Ontology, a philosophy based on the idea that everything is connected, contrary to the egocentrism of humanity. In a room filled with the central colours of the spectrum, one can ponder one’s place within the web of existence, while experiencing some of Dunseath’s crystal formations taking on a life of their own.

Netta Peltola and Hortense Duthilleux @ No. 90
(29th January – 9th February)

“Latitude’ utilises No. 90 as a public space, remaining open to all for the exhibition’s duration. With this organic flow, the installation will respond to the relative amount of energy and collective movement within the space at any one time, revealing and concealing fragments of choreographed light. Using the passage of the sun as a means to express energy throughout the course of the day, ’Latitude’ creates an immersive, interactive space.

Charles Richardson: HEADBONE @ Zabludowicz Collection / until 8th November 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Thursday–Sunday 12–6pm

@ Zabludowicz Collection, 176 Prince of Wales Road, London NW5 3PT

Free entry

www.zabludowiczcollection.com

Exploring themes of male identity and uncertainty. Through the symbolic use of bodies, objects and gestures he navigates the idiosyncrasies that permeate the ‘lifestyles’ of today. Employing images of the absurd Richardson’s approach disarms through dark humour and the staging of infantile wonder.

The exhibition HEADBONE features a new single-channel video has as its central component, extending both the technical ambition and emotional complexity of his practice. Using digital photography Richardson creates 3D models of his own body, and the bodies of others, which are then animated with movement and sound. Bound in everyday detritus the figures appear frozen and mute, yet full of psychological resonance. The video is presented alongside sculptural objects linked to its production, and displayed in an installation constructed from foil-covered board that requires viewers to weave a route through to a final ‘chamber’.

Ryan Gander: Fieldwork @ Lisson Gallery / until 31st October 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Monday-Friday 10:00am-6:00pm
Saturday 11:00am-5:00pm

@ Lisson Gallery, 27 & 52 Bell Street, London NW1 5BU

Free entry

www.lissongallery.com

Ryan Gander returns for a third time to Lisson Gallery with Fieldwork, an exhibition of interlinking new works by the artist, each offering a glimpse of the inspirations that feed his practice.

Encompassing everything including a kitchen sink, the exhibition presents an individuated encyclopaedia that includes a year’s worth of skies, the clothes of absentee statues, a tent, a helium balloon, the artist’s phone number and a pebble beach. As ever with Gander’s art, the forms convened in Fieldwork are elliptic and opaque, starting stories for the viewer to invent or complete.

Occupying the entire back gallery, the titular work Fieldwork 2015 opens a window onto the revolving touchstones of Gander’s art. Objects from the artist’s collection – each seemingly found but on closer inspection uniquely crafted (for instance, a National Trust sign protecting ‘Culturefield’, Gander’s imaginary artistic utopia) – rotate round the room on a vast, walled-off conveyer belt. Views of these items gliding past momentarily (a baseball bat covered in nails, a pair of dead pigeons, a chocolate bar swoosh…) are granted via an aperture in the gallery’s wall, creating a memory game of strange associations and a prism of connections (a chess set, a tortured teddy bear, a dead chick served on a plate with a napkin signed by Picasso…) through which to consider the rest of the exhibition.

David Mabb: Announcer @ / William Morris Gallery / until 27th September 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Wed–Sun 10am–5pm

@ William Morris Gallery, Lloyd Park, Forest Road, Walthamstow, London E17 4PP

Free entry

www.wmgallery.org.uk

William Morris and Russian artist El Lissitzky both wanted to change people lives through their art. Whilst Morris saw beauty in the past, Lissitzky sought a new visual language for the future.

In his latest work, British artist David Mabb celebrates the utopian ideas of these two men through their seminal book designs: Morris’s Kelmscott Chaucer and Lissitzky’s For the Voice, a revolutionary book of poems by Vladimir Mayakovsky considered one of the finest achievements in Russian avant-garde bookmaking.

Comprising 30 canvasses, Announcer takes over the gallery space, interweaving and contrasting the two designs so that Morris and Lissitzky’s graphics are never able to fully merge or separate.

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