Duane Hanson @ Serpentine Galleries / until 13th September 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tuesday-Sunday 10am-6pm

@ Serpentine Sackler Gallery, West Carriage Drive, London W2 2A

Free entry

www.serpentinegalleries.org

Throughout his forty-year career, Duane Hanson (1925–1996) has made lifelike sculptures portraying working-class Americans.

Throughout his forty-year career, Hanson created lifelike sculptures portraying working-class Americans and overlooked members of society. Reminiscent of the Pop Art movement of the time, his sculptures transform the banalities and trivialities of everyday life into iconographic material. The exhibition at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery presents key works from the artist’s oeuvre.

Richard Prince: New Portraits @ Gagosian Gallery / until 1st August 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue–Sat 10-6

@ Gagosian Gallery, 17-19 Davies Street, London W1K 3DE

Free entry

www.gagosian.com

Innovative love it or hate it exhibition showcasing plagiarised works designed to make you think about all the taboo subjects including sexuality, feminism, stereotypes and people’s roles in society.

‘In 1984 I took some portraits. The way I did it was different. The way had nothing to do with the tradition of portraiture. If you wanted me to do your portrait, you would give me at least five photographs that had already been taken of yourself, that were in your possession (you owned them, they were yours), and more importantly . . . you were already happy with. You give me the five you liked and I would pick the one I liked. I would rephotograph the one I liked and that would be your portrait. Simple. Direct. To the point . . .’

Mac Conner: A New York Life @ House of Illustration / until 28th June 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tues-Sun, 10am-6pm

@ House of Illustration, 2 Granary Square, King’s Cross, London N1C 4BH

Tickets: £7 book online

www.houseofillustration.org.uk

Featuring over 70 original works by McCauley ‘Mac’ Conner, one of the defining illustrators of America’s golden age of advertising.

This is the first time the work of one of New York’s original ‘Mad Men’ has been the subject of a major exhibition in the UK.

In the 1940s – 1960s, Conner’s captivating advertising and editorial illustrations graced the pages of major magazines and helped shape the image of postwar America. One of the influential group of commercial artists at the heart of Manhattan’s thriving advertising and publishing scene, Conner’s hand-painted illustrations capture the style and spirit of a pivotal era in American history.

Mac Conner: A New York Life will present Conner’s published work alongside reference photos and preliminary designs, a selection of fiction stories accompanied by illustrations from Conner and his contemporaries, advertising tearsheets for major clients such as Ford, United Airlines and AT&T, correspondence letters with editors and art directors and more – presenting a window on the dynamic world of the illustrators who created the look of a generation.

Slinakachu: Miniaturesque @ Andipa Gallery / Friday 13th March until 11th April 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Monday to Friday 9.30am to 6.00pm
Saturday 11.00am to 6.00pm

@ Andipa Gallery, 162 Walton Street, London, SW3 2JL, UK

Free entry

www.andipa.com

Shot in London during different seasons over the past year, Slinkachu’s new body of work draws upon our desire to seek out and recreate the natural world amongst the urban metropolis.

His miniature people, photographed on the streets of London and then left in situ – or “abandoned” – by the artist, explore the hidden enclaves of the wild within our city. Slinkachu captures idyllic glades and green pastures, in reality weeds and moss that appear through cracks in the concrete, and comment on our modern society’s detachment from nature.

The new works employ irony, humour and a healthy dose of reality; despite their fantastical situations, the miniature figures we observe are not so dissimilar to ourselves, living in the shadows between the real and artificial.

Tony Oursler: template/variant/friend/stranger @ Lisson Gallery / until 7th March 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Monday-Friday 10:00am-6:00pm
Saturday 11:00am-5:00pm

@ Lisson Gallery, 29 Bell Street, London NW1 5DA

Free entry

www.lissongallery.com

The first new work centres around the Oursler’s fascination with the evolution of identity via techniques of facial recognition technology.

He explores the nuanced ramifications of these tools increasing ubiquity in daily life. His interest in the face as the locus of communication and identity, through features, movement and expression, is central to these works.

A series of seven imposing photographic visages looms over the spectator in the main gallery, all but one punctured by video screens of eyes or mouths. One of part of the installation is an endlessly shifting projection of 150 algorithmically produced Eigen faces, revealing the beautiful yet distinctly non-human qualities of biometric analysis.

One of the artist’s intentions is to “invite the viewer to glimpse themselves from another perspective, that of the machines we have recently created”. Each of these giant portrait heads bears the network of marks or nodes associated with different facial recognition systems, used by border controls, law enforcement agencies and even ATM machines.

The images, staggered maze-like throughout the space in the manner of theatrical props, present themselves as potential police mug shots, closed-circuit camera stills or anonymous faces in the crowd, albeit magnified in scale and distorted by their mediation through surveillance technology.

Tony Oursler's new work is about facial recognition systems and the impact of surveillance technology on our rapidly evolving definition of identity. In the exhibition Tony Oursler – template/variant/friend/stranger, an installation titled GEN is an endlessly shifting projection of 150 algorithmically produced Eigen faces, revealing the beautiful yet distinctly non-human qualities of biometric analysis. One of the artist’s intentions is to “invite the viewer to glimpse themselves from another perspective, that of the machines we have recently created”. But at the moment even the most advanced facial recognition technology can be thwarted by even small alterations to the appearance of a face. Obscuring key features, shadows, movement, applying markings or makeup which disrupts the symmetry of your features or even looking down make it difficult for a facial recognition system to identify you. In this portion of the film 'Dazzle' makeup is applied to a face as anti-face-recognition camo that protects against being identified. #noIDselfie #antiselfie @TonyOursler #TonyOursler #LissonGallery #facialrecognition #facialrecognitionsoftware #facialrecognitiontechnology #patternrecognition#profiling #privacy #CCTV #identity #ID #biometrics #surveillance #artificialintelligence #AI #antiselfie #Cameras #Algorithms #Faces #Makeup #Facerecognition #Patterns #Technology

A video posted by Lisson Gallery (@lisson_gallery) on

Holly Hendry: More and more, more is more @ Bosse & Baum / until

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Thursday–Friday 12pm–6pm

@ Bosse & Baum, 133 Copeland Road, London SE15 3SN

Free entry

www.bosseandbaum.com

The exhibition reflects some of the text’s preoccupations with our use of space, spreading like a toxic mass across the planet uniting shopping malls, airports, hotels and art galleries. Space, according to Koolhaas, is sealed together by skin, like a bubble, and is investigated through its containers: ‘all theory for the production of space is based on an obsessive preoccupation with its opposite …architecture’. Titled ‘More and more, more is more,’ after a phrase from Rem Koolhaas’ essay Junkspace, a lament for modern architecture.

Helen Carmel Benigson: Anxious, Stressful, Insomnia Fat @ Carroll / Fletcher / until 21st February 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10:00-18:00

@ Carroll / Fletcher, 56 – 57 Eastcastle Street, London W1W 8EQ

Free entry

www.carrollfletcher.com

Inspired by a recent health app purchase that monitors women’s bodies, Benigson’s latest exhibition interrogates the flatness prescribed by the Internet onto the body, confronting the strange continuum existing between our dematerialised, virtual lives and our ‘real-life’ selves. She creates highly visceral and sensual environments which reference pop culture, contemporary game playing and animation. Sexually charged images and sounds based on her own body and rapper-persona (Princess Belsize Dollar), or actors and dancers who act as her stand­ins, often take centre stage in frenzied, schizophrenic performances.

From projected videos of flesh to digital-print cut outs of flattened bodies, the works in Anxious, Stressful, Insomnia Fat all address core concerns in Benigson’s practice which emphasises performance within the space of the screen, and explores the negotiation of identity, territory and embodiment within cyberspace.

Her exhibition follows on from her 2014 exhibition and residency Weightloss Utopias at Site Gallery, Sheffield which centred on issues of weightlessness and the perception of physical mass within online space. During the residency, Benigson staged a series of real and scripted weight-loss support groups that took place within a multi-screen video installation. These weight‐loss support group members then became avatars – digitalized versions of themselves within her videos, questioning the dematerialisation of the body through coding and information. At Carroll / Fletcher, Benigson will present four new video works made especially for the exhibition in a psychedelic digital carnival, which repetitively enacts the blurred boundaries between performer, producer and spectator, intrinsic to online video sharing.

Helen Carmel Benigson (b.1985, London) was recently involved in Platform, a residency programme at Sheffield’s Site Gallery and the LUX Associate Artist Program. Recent solo exhibitions include: Performa.13 After Hours, New York; Going to Africa via a Machine Called a Sunbed, Meantime Project Space, Cheltenham and the Irma Stern Museum, Cape Town; and Palm Trees and Poker Players at UCA, Farnham and Breathe Harder, a site-specific performance at Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Recent group exhibitions include: Ericka Beckman: Image games – work in context at Tate Modern, London; Videonale.14 at the Kunstmuseum, Bonn, Lagos and Odessa; Videocracy at The Centre for Contemporary Art, Tel Aviv and The House in the Sky at Concrete, Hayward Gallery, London. In 2014, Benigson was awarded a Clarendon Scholarship to support her DPhil at the Ruskin School of Art, University of Oxford.

Conflict, Time, Photography @ Tate Modern / until 15th March 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
10.00–18.00 Sun–Thu
10.00–22.00 Fri–Sat

@ Tate Modern, The Eyal Ofer Galleries Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: around £13 book online

From the seconds after a bomb is detonated to a former scene of battle years after a war has ended, this moving exhibition focuses on the passing of time, tracing a diverse and poignant journey through over 150 years of conflict around the world, since the invention of photography.

In an innovative move, the works are ordered according to how long after the event they were created from moments, days and weeks to decades later. Photographs taken seven months after the fire bombing of Dresden are shown alongside those taken seven months after the end of the First Gulf War. Images made in Vietnam 25 years after the fall of Saigon are shown alongside those made in Nakasaki 25 years after the atomic bomb. The result is the chance to make never-before-made connections while viewing the legacy of war as artists and photographers have captured it in retrospect.

Giacomo Bufarini aka RUN: Parabola Di G @ Howard Griffin Gallery / until 31st January 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Tue-Sun 12PM-8PM

@ Howard Griffin Gallery, 189 Shoreditch High Street, London E1 6HU

Free entry

www.howardgriffingallery.com

For the first time, RUN is exhibiting under his real name, Giacomo Bufarini.

In this unique exhibition, he leads us through a semi-autobiographical story told through a unique series of highly detailed pen and ink drawings that collectively make up a book. On this voyage of self-discovery, Bufarini is both the creator and protagonist, trapped within his own story. Bufarini plays with levels of reality and metaphor, creating a dreamscape that appears at once fantastical and very real.

Parabola di G follows the journey of a semi-fictional character, G, as he falls through levels of reality into a dreamscape. The exhibition presents a unique opportunity to see the original drawings of the book presented within an immersive gallery wide installation.

Shinebright @ Wrapping Gallery / until Wednesday 17th December 2014

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 11:00-19:00

@ The Wrapping Gallery, 15 Bateman Street, Soho, London W1D 3AQ

Free entry

www.shinebrightstudio.co.uk

Following on from the summer’s successful Shinebright studio, created to nurture and promote young creative talent, glacéau vitaminwater’s exciting new project, the ‘wrapping gallery’ is celebrating the work of local artists whilst offering people the chance to make sure their special gifts Shinebright this Christmas.

With infamous London-based painter and street artist Inkie* at the helm, the wrapping gallery will house 10 emerging artists including Jack Hudson, Lynnie Zulu, Lucy Vigrass and the Day Job collective. The team of artists are designing, screenprinting, illustrating, block printing, stamping and stenciling rolls upon rolls of gigantic wrapping paper with their own designs and interpretations of what it means to shine bright.

The space will be a destination for busy shoppers to seek calm and inspiration. A place to have their carefully selected gifts wrapped by professionals in one-off sheets of paper created on-site before their eyes by an array of talented young artists.