Tag: exhibitions (page 1 of 16)

Summer Exhibition 2017 @ Royal Academy of Arts / until 20th August 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Mon – Thu, Sat – Sun 10am – 6pm
Fri 10am – 10pm

@ Royal Academy of Arts, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BD

Tickets: £14 book online

www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/summer-exhibition-2017

Everything you’ll see at the Summer Exhibition ☀️😎 represents the art being made today. Expect to find a panorama of art in all media, from painting, printmaking, film and photography to sculpture, architectural works and performance art.

Almost 250 years ago, the RA’s founding members agreed to hold an “Annual Exhibition of Paintings, Sculptures and Designs … open to all Artists”, to help finance the training of young artists in the Royal Academy Schools. Now, nearly 250 years later, ahead of our big anniversary in 2018, Royal Academician Eileen Cooper, explores themes of discovery and new talent from her unique position as Keeper of the Royal Academy – the Academician who is responsible for supporting and guiding the students.

Cooper takes on the mantle of coordinating the largest open submission exhibition in the world, hanging over 1,200 works by artists established and lesser-known in the space of just eight days. Don’t miss work by internationally renowned artists Rosemarie Trockel, Julian Schnabel, Hassan Hajjaj, Secundino Hernández, Isaac Julien, Tomoaki Suzuki, Mark Wallinger and Sean Scully RA, as well as submissions by new Royal Academicians including Gilbert & George and David Adjaye. Other highlights include Yinka Shonibare RA’s six metre high colourful wind sculpture in the RA Courtyard, and Farshid Moussavi RA’s unique focus on construction coordination drawings in the Architecture Gallery.

Howard Hodgkin: Absent Friends @ National Portrait Gallery / until Sunday 18th June 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Sat – Wed, 10am – 6pm
Thu – Fri, 10am – 9pm

@ National Portrait Gallery, St Martin’s Place, London WC2H 0HE

Tickets: £10 book online

www.npg.org.uk/whatson/howard-hodgkin-absent-friends/home

This is the first exhibition of portraits by Howard Hodgkin (1932-2017), one of Britain’s greatest artists. Hodgkin’s paintings are characterised by rich colour, complex illusionistic space and sensuous brushwork. By emphasising these pictorial elements, his work frequently appears entirely abstract. However, over the course of 65 years, a principal concern of Hodgkin’s art has been to evoke a human presence.

The role of memory, the expression of emotion, and the exploration of relationships between people and places are all preoccupations. The exhibition explores Hodgkin’s development of a personal visual language of portraiture, which challenges traditional forms of representation.

Darryl Makes Comics (DMC) @ Hang–Up Gallery / until 25th June 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 12-00-18:00 (closed Mondays)

@ Hang-Up Gallery, 81 Stoke Newington Road, Stoke Newington, London N16 8AD

Free entry

www.hanguppictures.com/exhibition/dmc

East London’s Hang-Up Gallery are exclusively launching the new collection of works by Darryl ‘DMC’ McDaniels from Hip-Hop’s most notorious band, Run-DMC. The Art of DMC is the icon’s inaugural London exhibition and will host the new and unseen collection of ‘Darryl Makes Comics (DMC)’ Fine Art, a body of signed limited edition prints borne out of his love and deep passion for comics.

Darryl McDaniels is best known as the co-founding member of ‘Run DMC’. One of the major pioneers of hip-hop culture and arguably THE hottest rap act of the 1980s and 1990s, they are still loved today by millions around the world.

Comics and their superhero characters have always played a huge part in DMC’s life. In fact, many of the stories and speeches made by his favourite comic characters are the inspiration for his lyrics later created for Run DMC.

“I was a nervous little nerdy kid,” DMC says. “I didn’t want to get up in front of y’all and rhyme but then what gave me confidence out there on stage was pretending that I was the Hulk on the microphone.”

DMC, the debut title from Darryl Makes Comics, imagines an alternate history that blends traditional comic book storytelling with the pressures and anxieties of 1980’s NYC. Featuring collaborations with some of the hottest talent in comics and illustration today, a cool 80’s vibe and authentic street art, DMC is a superhero for those who need one most. The character dons his tracksuit, Adidas trainers and knuckle dusters to defend the city’s marginalised citizens against super villain and super hero alike.

For those in the know, you will delight in the tributes to DMC’s favourite comics you grew up with. For those that aren’t, you’ll gasp at the impact on the wall, the accessibility of the genre, and the fact that this was all started by a Hip-Hop legend millions grew up with.

About the artist:
Darryl McDaniels (Run DMC) dons his tracksuit and Adidas sneakers to defend the city’s marginalised citizens against super villain and super hero alike. DMC is a superhero for those who need one most… Darryl Makes Comics (DMC) is an independent comic book imprint created by Darryl McDaniels (Run DMC), collaborator and Editor-in-Chief Edgardo Miranda- Rodriguez, and music executive Riggs Morales. Darryl Makes Comics is dedicated to the idea that every walk of life has heroes and stories worth telling. Comics and their superhero characters have always played a huge part in DMC’s life. In fact, many of the stories and speeches made by his favourite comic characters are the inspiration for his lyrics later created for Run DMC.

Into the Unknown: A Journey through Science Fiction @ Barbican Art Gallery / until 1st September 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 11am – 8pm (Thu and Fri until 9pm)

@ Barbican Art Gallery, Level 3, Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS

From £14.50 book online

www.barbican.org.uk/intotheunknown

The genre-defining exhibition of art, design, film and literature.

From the 19th century cabinet of curiosities, to the vastness of space. Through future cities, into the inner landscapes of human perception.

Uncover the mysterious lands of Jules Verne and Ray Harryhausen where Science Fiction narratives first took root. Venture on an odyssey into our solar system, with vintage artwork promoting Soviet visions of space alongside immersive work by Soda_Jerk. Visit a gallery of aliens, and stand alongside iconic spacesuits from a galaxy of blockbusters including Star Trek and Interstellar.

Imagine dystopian worlds with Margaret Atwood and 28 Days Later. Then, with nowhere left to explore but human consciousness, delve deep and experience the transformation and mutation of the body through the eyes of Jack Kirby and Ex Machina.

Curated by historian and writer Patrick Gyger, this festival-style exhibition consists of more than 800 works, many of which have never been seen in the UK before. Continuing across the Centre, it includes artwork from Isaac Julien, Larissa Sansour and Conrad Shawcross, and an installation from the creators of Black Mirror.

People Power: Fighting for Peace @ IWM / until 28th August 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10am-6pm

@ IWM London, Lambeth Road, London SE1 6HZ

Tickets: £10 book online

www.iwm.org.uk/exhibitions/iwm-london/fighting-for-peace

Take a journey from the First World War to the present day, exploring how peace movements have influenced perceptions of war and conflict in this major exhibition.

From conscientious objectors to peace camps and modern day marches, Fighting for Peace tells the stories of passionate people over the past one hundred years and the struggles they have endured for the anti-war cause.

Over three hundred objects including paintings, literature, posters, placards, banners, badges and music reveal the breadth of creativity of anti-war protest movements, reflecting the cultural mood of each era.

Postponed Futures @ Gallery for Russian Arts and Design / until 24 June 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Fri 11am-7pm (Sat 5pm)

@ GRAD (Gallery for Russian Arts and Design), 3-4A Little Portland Street, London W1W 7JB

Free entry

www.grad-london.com

An exhibition that offers an alternative perspective on early twentieth century Ukrainian avantgarde practices through the lens of contemporary Ukrainian art.

Curated by Kiev-based artist Nikita Kadan, the exhibition includes historical works by twentieth century masters Oleksandr Bohomazov, Vasyl Ermilov, Maria Synyakova and Oleksandr Khvostenko-Khvostov, alongside collages by Lada Nakonechna, a film by Mykola Ridnyi and a sculpture by Nikita Kadan, inspired by ‘Monument to three Revolutions’ by Vasyl Ermilov.

SOHO @ The Peacock (Sadler’s Wells) / until Saturday 20th May 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Tue – Sat at 7.30pm
Sat at 2.30pm
Sun at 2pm and 6pm

@ The Peacock, Portugal Street, London WC2A 2HT

Tickets: from £25 book online

www.peacocktheatre.com/whats-on/soho

Circus, street and theatre mix where glamour and sleaze rub shoulders in this diverse trip around the streets of Soho.

SOHO – just one word conjures up London’s world famous district full of sounds, vibes and its unique buzz: a place filled with gloriously diverse characters. SOHO – It’s not just a place, it’s a state of mind….

The show has a seriously crazy and multi talented international cast tell the fast-paced story of a young man’s walk on the wild side, as the colourful characters he meets reveal an unexpected and darkly fantastical world, where glamour and sleaze rub shoulders.

Featuring soaring aerial acrobatics on moving trapezes take the energetic world class performers on a rollercoaster ride. With the pulsating sound of the underground, and the music scene that is Soho’s heartbeat = 21st century indie, buskers, the burlesque of the 50s, the 60s love and peace Carnaby Street generation, disco and punk of the 70s, Cool Britannia pop of the 80s and rave of the 90s – SOHO has THE iconic soundtrack that is….Soho

Tunnel: The Archaeology of Crossrail @ Museum of London Docklands / until 3rd September 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10am – 6pm

@ Museum of London Docklands, No1 Warehouse, West India Quay, London E14 4AL

Free entry

www.museumoflondon.org.uk/museum-london-docklands/whats-on/exhibitions/tunnel-archaeology-crossrail

The most complete range of archaeological objects unearthed by Crossrail, Europe’s largest infrastructure project, is on display alongside the story of this great feat of engineering in a major exhibition.

The construction of London’s newest railway, which will be known as the Elizabeth line when services begin in 2018, has given archaeologists a unique chance to explore some of the city’s most historically important sites. Since work began in 2009, the project has undertaken one of the most extensive archaeological programmes ever in the UK, with over 10,000 artefacts shining a light on almost every important period of the Capital’s history. Read more about the archaeology behind the exhibition from the curator, Jackie Keily.

The wide variety of items on display explores 8,000 years of human history, revealing the stories of Londoners ranging from Mesolithic tool makers and inhabitants of Roman Londinium to those affected by the Great Plague of 1665.

These finds were discovered in locations as diverse as suburban Abbey Wood in the south east, through Canary Wharf, across to Liverpool Street, Tottenham Court Road and ending in Westbourne Park and Acton. The finds sit against a backdrop telling the engineering story of the largest infrastructure project currently underway in Europe, with key facts and figures presented throughout.

Richard Tuttle: The Critical Edge @ Pace Gallery / until 13 May 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tues-Sat 10-6

@ Pace Gallery, 6 Burlington Gardens, London W1S 3ET

Free entry

www.pacegallery.com/exhibitions/12860/the-critical-edge

An exhibition of recent works in fabric by Richard Tuttle. First presented at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, in 2016, the exhibition follows two other major exhibitions of Tuttle’s work. In 2014, The Whitechapel Gallery surveyed the artist’s career from the 1960s to today and Tate Modern commissioned Tuttle’s largest textile sculpture to date for its iconic Turbine Hall.

Richard Tuttle (b. 1941, Rahway, New Jersey) is one of the most significant artists working today. Since the mid-1960s, he has created an extraordinarily varied body of work that eludes historical or stylistic categorization. Tuttle’s work exists in the space between painting, sculpture, poetry, assemblage, and drawing. He draws beauty out of humble materials, reflecting the fragility of the world in his poetic works. Without a specific reference point, his investigations of line, volume, color, texture, shape, and form are imbued with a sense of spirituality and informed by a deep intellectual curiosity. Language, spatial relationship, and scale are also central concerns for the artist, who maintains an acute awareness for the viewer’s aesthetic experience. Tuttle was the Artist in Residence at the Getty Research Institute from September 2012–June 2013. The artist lives and works in Mount Desert, Maine; Abiquiu, New Mexico and New York City.

Ashley Bickerton: Ornamental Hysteria @ Newport Street Gallery / until 20th August 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Tuesday – Sunday 10am – 6pm
Closed on Mondays

@ Newport Street Gallery, Newport Street, London SE11 6AJ

Free entry

www.newportstreetgallery.com/exhibitions/ashley-bickerton

Spanning more than three decades of Bickerton’s career and features 51 works, including a significant display of new and previously unexhibited pieces. It is the artist’s first UK show since 2009 and runs throughout all six spaces at Newport Street Gallery.

Bickerton moved to New York in 1982 and after working as a painting assistant to Jack Goldstein, he emerged as a key figure on the newly exploding East Village art scene. Within the context of the culture of commodification sweeping America he rose to prominence as part of an amorphous movement that was branded ‘Neo-Geometric Conceptualism’. Alongside artists such as Haim Steinbach and Jeff Koons, Bickerton endeavoured to reframe the practice of art production in response to the new, seductive mechanisms of desire at work in society.

Bickerton abandoned New York in 1993, eventually settling in Bali, where he still lives and works. Whilst a number of his themes prevailed, the materiality of his work shifted dramatically after this self-imposed exile from the urban environment.

Both in materiality and content, Bickerton’s work resists categorisation. On the diversity of his mediums – photocollage, appropriated image, digital image, paint and sculpture – he states: “Painting is far too cartoony and lacks the backbone of factuality; photography is too clinical and incapable of loony launches into the ether; and sculpture can be just downright presumptuous. […] Only in their combination do I find comfort.”

Bickerton’s conceptual commitment to intersectionality extends to his subject matter; his audacious and technically complex assemblages are predicated on themes of opposition and duality, for example representation and reality, creativity and commodity, nature and artifice, idyll and apocalypse. This is evident in his earlier work on display in gallery 1, which offers a sardonic critique of contemporary consumer culture and the commodification of the ‘art object’ via steel and aluminium wall-mounted ‘Culturescapes’ from the ‘Logo’ and ‘Non-Word Word’ series. Galleries 3 and 4 are dominated by Bickerton’s ‘Sea’ and ‘Landscapes’ – overblown and incongruous, they contain ephemera from the anthroposphere in the simulated shells of transportation devices. In part, these “truly contemporary” landscapes might be read as a dystopian view of the devastating impact of man on the ecosphere.

Throughout his career, Bickerton has challenged the relevancy of traditional art-historical tropes. His ‘self-portraits’ similarly parody the mythological figure of ‘the artist’, who is represented in the guise of the brands he chooses to endorse in Tormented Self-Portrait: Susie at Arles (25 Years) (2014) and as a five-bodied, technicoloured serpent in the monumental 5 Snake Heads (2009), on display in Newport Street’s double-height gallery 2.

Bickerton’s practice evolved in the late 90s to incorporate digital image and photography. In portraits such as Smiling Woman (2009), models (often family members and friends) are heavily made-up and photographed, then distorted in Photoshop before the image is printed on canvas and re-painted. These paintings are amongst Bickerton’s most overtly satirical, presenting lurid, constructed visions of life on a generic Pacific / Caribbean island.

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