Tag: exhibitions (page 1 of 14)

The Radical Eye: Modernist Photography from the Sir Elton John Collection @ Tate Modern / until 21st May 2017 📷

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Monday to Sunday 10.00–18.00
Friday to Saturday 10.00–22.00

@ Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: £15 book online

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/radical-eye-modernist-photography-sir-elton-john-collection

This is a once-in-a-lifetime chance to see one of the world’s greatest private collections of photography, drawn from the classic modernist period of the 1920s–50s. An incredible group of Man Ray portraits are exhibited together for the first time, having been brought together by Sir Elton John over the past twenty-five years, including portraits of Matisse, Picasso, and Breton.

With over 70 artists and nearly 150 rare vintage prints on show from seminal figures including Brassai, Imogen Cunningham, André Kertész, Dorothea Lange, Tina Modotti, and Aleksandr Rodchenko, this is a chance to take a peek inside Elton John’s home and delight in seeing such masterpieces of photography.

Jo Brocklehurst: Nobodies and Somebodies @ House of Illustration / until 14th May 2017 ✏️

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Sun, 10am-6pm

@ 2 Granary Square, King’s Cross, N1C 4BH

Tickets: £7.50 book online

www.houseofillustration.org.uk/whats-on/current-future-events/jo-brocklehurst-nobodies-and-somebodies

Drawing live in fetish clubs, punk squats and on the performance scene of 1970-90s London, Berlin and New York, Jo Brocklehurst’s artwork is a unique record of subculture.

Her figurative paintings from fetish clubs document experiments with sex, androgyny and couture that later inspired the mainstream fashion collections of Jean Paul Gaultier, while her best-known portraits from the 1980s offer a raw, beautiful and female perspective on punk.

Co-curated by her model and muse Isabelle Bricknall, the exhibition also features her drawings of Berlin’s 1990s performing arts scene for the Berliner Zeitung newspaper, alongside clubland-inspired interpretations of Alice Through the Looking Glass.

The American Dream: Pop to the Present @ British Museum / until 18th June 2017 🇺🇸

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10am – 5.30pm (Fri until 8.30pm)

@ British Museum, Great Russell Street, London WC1B 3DG

Tickets: £17.50 book online

Trace the creative momentum of a superpower in this major new exhibition.

The past six decades have been among the most dynamic and turbulent in US history, from JFK’s assassination, Apollo 11 and Vietnam to the AIDS crisis, racism and gender politics. Responding to the changing times, American artists produced prints unprecedented in their scale and ambition.

Starting with the explosion of pop art in the 1960s, the exhibition includes works by the most celebrated American artists. From Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg to Ed Ruscha, Kara Walker and Julie Mehretu – all boldly experimented with printmaking. Experience this extraordinary history through their eyes.

Taking inspiration from the world around them – billboard advertising, global politics, Hollywood and household objects – American artists created highly original prints to rival their paintings and sculptures. Printmaking brought their work to a much wider and more diverse audience.

The sheer inventiveness and technical ingenuity of their prints reflects America’s power and influence during this period. Many of these works also address the deep divisions in society that continue to resonate with us today – there are as many American dreams as there are Americans.

This exhibition presents the Museum’s outstanding collection of modern and contemporary American prints for the first time. These will be shown with important works from museums and private collections around the world.

Sonia Boyce: We move in her way @ ICA / until 16th Apr 2017 💁

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Sun 11am–11pm (Thu until 9pm)

@ Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA), The Mall, London SW1Y 5AH

£1 day membership, find out more

www.ica.art/whats-on/sonia-boyce-we-move-her-way

A new body of work created especially for the ICA. Involving the exploratory vocal and movement performances of Elaine Mitchener, Barbara Gamper and her dancers Eve Stainton, Ria Uttridge and Be van Vark, with an invited audience.

A multi-media installation has been generated from the documentation of their open-ended live performance. The title of the work suggests two possible readings: that ‘she’ dictates our movements; or that we obstruct ‘hers’, with both interpretations suggesting power is at play.

Boyce has a participatory art practice where she invites others to engage performatively with improvisation. In this process, she encourages contributors to exercise their own responses to the situations she enables, where she steps back from any directorial position to observe the activities and dynamics of exchange as they unfold. Once the performance is played out and documented, Boyce reshapes the material generated, in what she calls “recouping the remains”, to create the artwork as a multi-media installation.

We move in her way was created in this way as a performative laboratory, in which the audience and performers negotiated the ICA Theatre space around sculptural objects and their own bodies. Play and playfulness unfolded during the open-ended live performance, sparking a breakdown of assumed order between performers and audience. The dynamics of power-play shifted between the masked audience, the performers and the sculptural objects created as a means to facilitate touch and being together, whilst remaining distinct.

Making Nature: How we see animals @ Wellcome Collection / until 21st May 2017 🐶🐱🐯🐵

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10am-6pm, until 10pm on Thursdays and closed Mondays

@ Wellcome Collection, 183 Euston Road, London NW1 2BE

Free entry

www.wellcomecollection.org/MakingNature

No matter how you see nature now, you’ll never see it the same way again.

Kicking off a year-long exploration into our relationship with nature, this major exhibition examines what we think, feel and value about other species and the consequences this has for the world around us. It brings together over 100 fascinating objects from literature, film, taxidermy and photography to reveal the hierarchies in our view of the natural world and consider how these influence our actions, or inactions, towards the planet.

Organised around four themes – ‘Ordering’, ‘Displaying’, ‘Observing’ and ‘Making’ – this exhibition questions the approach of ‘learning through looking’, charts the changing fashions of museum displays alongside society’s changing attitudes to the world around us, examines the search for an authentic encounter with nature, and looks at how humans have intentionally altered other organisms.

Richard Wilson: Stealing Space @ Annely Juda Fine Art / 25th March 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Monday–Friday 10:00–18:00
Saturday 11:00–17:00

@ Annely Juda Fine Art, 4th Floor, 23 Dering Street, London W1S 1AW

Free entry

www.annelyjudafineart.co.uk

The artist’s first at the gallery and his first solo show in London since unveiling his major site-specific work, Slipstream, at Heathrow Airport’s Terminal 2. The exhibition features four new works, two of which are in direct response to the gallery’s internal and external architecture.

Works in this exhibition dominate the gallery’s space and stand, in places, above the height of the architectural beams. In the main room, Wilson has created a sculpture of a slice of the negative space or “space between” the hallway and staircase leading to the gallery’s main entrance. Partial details of a doorway, steps or a bannister in negative form are visible on the sculpture which sits straight on the ground at a tilted angle, offering a reassessment of the perhaps completely unnoticed yet familiar surroundings the viewer has just encountered. Block of Dering, meanwhile, takes the façade of the gallery building at 23 Dering Street and reconfigures it into a near-cube. Even the gallery’s signage can be made out in this sculpture which presents the local architecture in an entirely new way.

In the second room, a sculpture delineates the “space between” an area of Wilson’s home in South East London whilst Blocka Flats takes a piece of household furniture reconfigured into a form reminiscent of an urban landscape on a micro scale, the very same landscape which Wilson refers to in other works on a 1:1 scale. Two preparatory sketches for each work hang near their sculptural counterparts, whilst in the final room, Wilson shows maquettes of past works and those not yet realised.

Richard Wilson is a world-renowned British artist whose architectural interventions have won him acclaim throughout his career. Wilson rose to prominence in 1987 when his installation, 20:50 – consisting of a room filled to waist height with reflective sump oil – was shown at Matt’s Gallery in London and purchased by The Saatchi Gallery. Wilson has gone on to create a series of predominantly site-specific works, most recently Slipstream (2014), which stands at an impressive 78 meters at Heathrow Airport’s Terminal 2. Wilson was appointed visiting research professor at the University of East London in 2004, elected as a member of the Royal Academy in 2006 and in 2008 was awarded an honorary doctorate at the University of Middlesex. He has created permanent and temporary works at prominent locations worldwide and his works have been shown at institutions such as The Serpentine Gallery, London; Saatchi Gallery, London; The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; National Gallery of Australia, Canberra and Museu d’Art Contemporani, Barcelona.

“I need that initial thing from the real world because I’ve always been concerned with the way you can alter someone’s perception, knock their view off kilter. And to do that I need to start with something we think we understand.”

One & Other @ Zabludowicz Collection / until 26th February 2017 😯

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Thu-Sun 12–6pm

@ Zabludowicz Collection, 176 Prince of Wales Road, London NW5 3PT

Free entry

www.zabludowiczcollection.com/exhibitions/view/testing-ground

One & Other explores the duality that emerges from the daily performing of a persona other than ourselves. The show constitutes a spatial experiment in which the concept of the stage is used as a metaphor to investigate this duality. A parallel is drawn between the dynamic of an actor and their performed role onstage and our relationship to our projected personas on social media platforms. From this starting point the exhibition questions, through a range of contemporary artworks of different mediums, the permanence of our identity, what influences it, the multiple shapes it takes and our relationship towards the other self.

“Self-identity has been questioned and explored constantly throughout the history of culture; it has been a clear generative force for much of the creativity in the world. Self-portraiture used to be the way artists explored their own selves, but the world keeps changing. Technology evolves furiously, people’s desires transform constantly. In this context, our virtual presence in digital platforms forces our identity to divide itself into who we are in reality and who we perform to be.” – the curatorial team

ABC Photography @ V&A Museum of Childhood / until 4th June 2017 📸

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10:00-17:45

@ V&A Museum of Childhood, Cambridge Heath Road, London E2 9PA

Free entry

www.vam.ac.uk/moc/exhibitions/abc-photography

The alphabet is reinvented in this display of critically acclaimed photographers exploring new notions of the age-old teaching tool for children – the alphabet book.

I is for… Imagine

N is for… Now

W is for… Who, What, Where, Why?

The display brings together a collection of international photography heroes and acclaimed photographers from various walks of life. Among the 26 artists are Martin Parr, Nan Goldin, Wolfgang Tillmans, Alec Soth, Peter Lindbergh and Sebastiao Salgado.

Sonia Boyce: We move in her way @ ICA / until 16th April 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 11am–6pm (Thursday 9pm)

@ Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA), The Mall, London SW1Y 5AH

Tickets: free with £1 day entrance, book online

www.ica.org.uk/whats-on/sonia-boyce-we-move-her-way

Exhibition involving the exploratory vocal and movement performances of Elaine Mitchener, Barbara Gamper and her dancers Eve Stainton, Ria Uttridge and Be van Vark, with an invited audience. A multi-media installation has been generated from the documentation of their open-ended live performance. The title of the work suggests two possible readings: that ‘she’ dictates our movements; or that we obstruct ‘hers’, with both interpretations suggesting power is at play.

Boyce has a participatory art practice where she invites others to engage performatively with improvisation. In this process, she encourages contributors to exercise their own responses to the situations she enables, where she steps back from any directorial position to observe the activities and dynamics of exchange as they unfold. Once the performance is played out and documented, Boyce reshapes the material generated, in what she calls “recouping the remains”, to create the artwork as a multi-media installation.

We move in her way was created in this way as a performative laboratory, in which the audience and performers negotiated the ICA Theatre space around sculptural objects and their own bodies. Play and playfulness unfolded during the open-ended live performance, sparking a breakdown of assumed order between performers and audience. The dynamics of power-play shifted between the masked audience, the performers and the sculptural objects created as a means to facilitate touch and being together, whilst remaining distinct.

Notions of difference and relatedness make reference to the enduring influence of Dada within We move in her. Processes of collaborative improvisation are exemplified in the piece, referencing the Brazilian artist Lygia Clark in the late 1960s and 70s. Some of the masks worn by the audience are a re-working of Sophie Tauber’s Dada Head (1920) – itself an appropriation of Oceanic sculpture. The final artwork takes another playful turn to create a multi-layered and multi-media installation.

teamLab: Transcending Boundaries @ Pace Gallery / until 11th March 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tues-Sat 11-4

@ PACE London, 6 Burlington Gardens, London W1S 3ET

Free entry, booking essential!

www.pacegallery.com
www.pacelondon.team-lab.net

Exploring the role of digital technology in transcending the physical and conceptual boundaries that exist between different artworks, with imagery from one work breaking free of the frame and entering the space of another.

The installations also dissolve distinctions between artwork and exhibition space, and involve the viewer through interactivity.

The largest room in the exhibition will include six works and feature Universe of Water Particles, Transcending Boundaries (2017), a virtual waterfall that extends beyond the gallery wall onto the floor, flowing through the exhibition space and around the feet of the viewer. It engages with the concept of Ultra Subjective Space, central to teamLab’s practice, referencing the non-perspectival depiction of space in premodern Japanese art and situating the viewer directly within the realm of the artwork.

Encompassing the second room, Dark Waves (2016) is a simulation of the movement of waves based on the behaviour of hundreds of thousands of water particles. The waves are created in a three-dimensional virtual space, expressing water as a living entity that immerses the viewer and suggests an intrinsic connection with nature.

In the last room, the darkened space is transformed by the presence of the viewer, which activates Flowers Bloom on People (2017). With the body as a canvas for the projections, flowers are in a process of continuous change—growing, decaying and scattering in direct response to the viewer’s movements.

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