Tag: exhibitions in london (page 1 of 4)

Fred Wilson: Afro Kismet at Pace Gallery until 27 April 2018

An exhibition featuring the artist’s most recent body of work originally produced for the 15th Istanbul Biennial in the autumn of 2017. The exhibition will be Wilson’s first at Pace London. On the occasion of Afro Kismet, Pace will publish a catalogue that will include an introduction by artist duo and Istanbul Biennial curators Elmgreen & Dragset, an essay by the Biennial’s Director Bige Örer, and an interview with the artist conducted by American novelist, playwright and essayist Darryl Pinckney. 👀

The genesis of the exhibition stretches back to 1992 when Wilson presented Re:Claiming Egypt, at the 4th International Cairo Biennale and to 2003 when Wilson represented the United States at the 50th Venice Biennale with Speak of Me as I Am. Wilson’s interest in Istanbul had been piqued for a long time; he conceived of the city as the third leg in a historically and culturally connected eastern Mediterranean triangle which also included Cairo and Venice. Through his research, Wilson developed a conceptual basis for the Istanbul project in which he contextualized pieces from the city’s Pera Museum’s Orientalist collection with new and existing works of his own. “My work is about an issue which is both personal and universal. […] A new meaning emerges from the coming together of art and history […] bring[ing] a fresh perspective to things we are used to seeing in museums. You can say that I tell a history which is not adequately discussed…” Fred Wilson, 2017.

For Pace, Wilson will reconfigure Afro Kismet which includes two chandeliers, two monumental Iznik tile walls, four black glass drip works, and a globe sculpture, as well as installations and vitrine pieces that gather cowrie shells, engravings, photographs, a Yoruba mask, and furniture, among other objects that the artist discovered in his frequent trips to Istanbul throughout 2016 and 2017. Since Venice Biennale in 2003, Wilson’s Murano glass chandeliers, with their shifts in scale, color, and complexity, have become vehicles for the artist’s meditations on blackness, death, and beauty. New chandeliers, included in the exhibition, combine black Murano glass with traditional metal and glass elements of Ottoman chandeliers, thus fusing two histories of craftsmanship and symbolizing the complex relationship between the Venetian and Ottoman Empires.

Throughout the exhibition, Wilson utilizes alluring materials—from richly coloured tiles walls to luminescent glass—to represent and investigate the long-ignored presence of communities of African descent in Turkey. In the two Iznik tile walls, the Arabic calligraphy translates in one case to “Mother Africa” and in the other “Black is Beautiful”. The new globe sculpture titled “Trade Winds” refers not to its original meaning, related to weather patterns, but to the complex and tragic global trade in human beings. The juxtaposition of recent works by Wilson with works from the 19th century – including Orientalist paintings with African subject matter by Alfred De Dreux and William James Müller – not only questions notions of universal knowledge and truth, but also sheds light on a history not thoroughly examined. By combining contemporary objects and museum-quality artefacts, Wilson challenges the assumptions of exhibition methodology and art historical scholarship.

www.pacegallery.com/exhibitions/12917/afro-kismet

Location:
Pace Gallery, 6 Burlington Gardens, London W1S 3ET

Times:
Tuesday – Saturday 10am – 6pm

Entry:
Free

Marianna Simnett and Ericka Beckman at Zabludowicz Collection until 8 July 2018

British artist Marianna Simnett creates fable-like film, performance, sound and light installations that examine the sense of intimacy yet anxious unfamiliarity we experience with our own bodies. She particularly focuses on the means we deploy to control these bodies, both technological and cultural. The exhibition presents a group of recent work from the Zabludowicz Collection: three films The Udder (2014), Blood (2015), and Blue Roses (2016) – installed as a trilogy for the first time – alongside a sound and light installation Faint with Light (2016).

Simnett’s films unfold from multiple, occasionally impossible perspectives (from within dreams or personifying internal organs), reflecting the fluidity of our identities as they are embodied and performed. Consistently working with untrained actors, many of the individuals Simnett meets through her research become collaborators, performing heightened versions of themselves within the films. Her works often provoke a visceral reaction, featuring unflinching depictions of many commonplace phobias such as needles, cockroaches, blood, and of medical procedures which the artist has herself undergone. They present the body as both monstrous and clinical, combining scientific description with the cathartic fantasy of musicals and horror genres. Simnett writes songs, performed by her cast, that lend an air of innocence and lightness to her densely layered storytelling.

Simnett’s works seek to create in-between states that defy and threaten easy categorisation by the patriarchal social structures that govern our bodies and identities. It’s an approach that throws into doubt binary categories such as innocence and cruelty, purity and contamination, desire and revulsion, and even life and death.

Marianna Simnett opens alongside a solo exhibition by American artist Ericka Beckman. The exhibitions continue the Collection’s 2018 focus on artists’ film and video examining ideas of embodiment and performance of identity in relation to technology. Beckman and Simnett have each established unique approaches to storytelling that draw upon fairy tale archetypes and their works share an interest in how gender is constructed and its relationship to mechanisms of desire and capitalist consumption. Their works reflect the impact of new technologies – robotics, virtual reality, bio-medical – on both the built environment and subjectivity. In addition, both artists have developed distinctive uses of sound in their work as a pre-linguistic tool for communication. They utilise tropes of the musical, from the abstract repetitions and rhythms of playground chants and nursery rhymes, to the cathartic effect of song as a narrative device.

In her first major solo exhibition in the UK, Zabludowicz Collection is pleased to present four seminal works from the Collection by American artist Ericka Beckman that span over 30 years of genre-defying filmmaking. Beckman’s work consistently treats film as a performance medium, and draws on the pioneering energy of her years at CalArts and the do-it-yourself sensibilities of New York’s Downtown Scene in the late 1970s and early 80s. It also astutely anticipates the social and cultural impact of video gaming and online networks over recent decades. Shot on 16mm, with all the animation and visual effects being constructed in camera through multiple exposures, Beckman’s films create narratives using the pedagogic and competitive structures of games. They playfully reveal the conditions of gender and identity formation in relation to labour, leisure, architecture and capital.

Ericka Beckman opens alongside a solo exhibition by British artist Marianna Simnett. The exhibitions continue the Collection’s 2018 focus on artists’ film and video and examining ideas of embodiment and performance of identity in relation to technology. Beckman and Simnett have each established unique approaches to storytelling that draw upon fairy tale archetypes and their works share an interest in how gender is constructed and its relationship to mechanisms of desire and capitalist consumption. Their works reflect the impact of new technologies – robotics, virtual reality, bio-medical – on both the built environment and subjectivity. In addition, both artists have developed distinctive uses of sound in their work as a pre-linguistic tool for communication. They utilise tropes of the musical from the abstract repetitions and rhythms of playground chants and nursery rhymes, to the cathartic effect of song as a narrative device.

www.zabludowiczcollection.com/exhibitions/view/marianna-simnett

Location:
Zabludowicz Collection, 176 Prince of Wales Road, London NW5 3PT

Times:
Thursday – Sunday 12-6pm

Tickets:
Free entry

Smith & Sinclair’s The Flavour Gallery at The Hoxton Basement until 17 December 2017

The gallery pop-up invites you to consume art in ways they never imagined by using the senses to explore each piece of original artwork. 👆 😛

The Flavour Gallery features some of the most awe-inspiring artists of today including Bowie collaborator Terry Pastor, weaving masters London Loom and visual artist Anja Predojevic, who have been commissioned to create interactive artwork that challenges perceptions of what a gallery should be.

The Hoxton Basement plays host to artwork beyond imagination, art that changes colour, diffuses delightful smells and reacts to its audience. With latex-heavy works from artist Tom O’Hare in association with intimate lifestyle brand LELO, The Flavour Gallery will also feature God’s Own Junkyard, a cocktail bar in partnership with Lanique and a gift shop selling unique works exclusive to visitors.

www.smithandsinclair.com/theflavourgallery

Location:
The Hoxton Basement, 12-18 Hoxton Street, London N1 6NG

Times:
Monday closed
Tuesday closed
Wednesday 5:30pm and 9:30pm
Thursday 5:30pm and 9:30pm
Friday 5:30pm and 10:30pm
Saturday 2:30pm and 10:30pm
Sunday 2:30pm and 8:30pm

Price:
£15 book online

Dalí / Duchamp at Royal Academy of Arts until 3 January 2018

Take another look at two artistic giants: father of conceptual art Marcel Duchamp, and larger-than-life Surrealist Salvador Dalí. This is the first exhibition to throw light on their surprising relationship and its influence on the work of both artists. 👨‍🎨 🎨

On the surface, these two great 20th-century artists could hardly be more dissimilar, but Dalí and Duchamp maintained a lasting bond of friendship and mutual admiration throughout their careers.

What fuelled this seemingly unlikely friendship was deeper than their shared artistic interests – amongst them eroticism, language, optics and games. More fundamentally, the two men were united by a combination of humour and scepticism which led both, in different ways, to challenge conventional views of art and life.

This original exhibition brings together around 80 works, including some of Dalí’s most inspired and technically accomplished paintings and sculptures, and Duchamp’s groundbreaking assemblages and readymades. It will also showcase the less familiar: photographs by Dalí, paintings by Duchamp, correspondence and collaborations between the two artists.

Presented as a conversation taking place through art, this focused exploration offers fresh ways of looking at two figures, radically revising their familiar places in art history. Through the lens of their intriguing friendship, visitors will gain a new perspective on two equally inventive, intelligent and irreverent minds. The exhibition is curated by Dawn Ades and William Jeffett, with Sarah Lea and Desiree de Chair.

www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/dali-duchamp

Location:
Royal Academy of Arts, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BD

Times:
Mon – Thu and Sat – Sun 10am – 6pm
Fri 10am – 10pm

Price:
From £15 book online

Poster Girls a century of art and design at London Transport Museum

This powerful new exhibition shines a spotlight on 20th and 21st century female graphic designers and reveals the contribution they have made to poster design over the last one hundred years. With over 150 posters and original artworks on display, this exhibition attempts to recognise some of these forgotten design heroines and reveal the hidden stories behind their work. 💁

Poster Girls – a century of art and design will feature some of the leading female artists who have worked for London Transport and Transport for London including well-known designers, such as Mabel Lucie Attwell, Laura Knight, Enid Marx and Zandra Rhodes, alongside lesser known individuals who nonetheless changed the way Londoners viewed their city. The works on display show a dazzling spectrum of artistic styles and mediums; modernist, figurative, flat colour, boldly patterned, abstract, collage and oil.

Starting in the early 1900s the exhibition will take a broadly chronological approach, moving through the decades to contemporary times, unearthing how each era influenced the artists’ stylistic approach and highlighting the role played by London Transport in commissioning female talent.

www.ltmuseum.co.uk/whats-on/exhibitions

Doors:
10:00 – 18:00

Location:
London Transport Museum, Covent Garden Piazza, London WC2E 7BB

Price:
£17.50 various discounts available, book online (includes entry to the museum)

The World of Anna Sui @ Fashion and Textile Museum / until 1st October 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Tue – Sat, 11am – 6pm (Thu until 8pm)
Sun 11am – 5pm
Mon closed

@ Fashion and Textile Museum, 83 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3XF

Tickets: £9.90 book online

www.ftmlondon.org/ftm-exhibitions/the-world-of-anna-sui

Anna Sui is the classic American fashion designer. From Detroit to New York, her signature rock-n-roll romanticism reinvents pop culture for every new generation.

Since her first catwalk show in 1991, Sui has shaped not only the garments, textiles, accessories, beauty and interiors which comprise her design universe, but also the course of fashion history. The World of Anna Sui features over 100 looks from the designer’s archive, presenting a roll call of archetypes from Surfers and School Girls to Hippies, Mods and Punks. This is the first time an American designer has been the focus of a retrospective exhibition in the UK.

@annasui's newest fragrance, Fantasia, has just arrived EXCLUSIVELY in the Fashion and Textile Museum Shop! Of this perfume, Anna says "It's all about enchantment. In everything I do, I'm always trying to transport you to exotic faraway places, to beautiful new worlds." And Anna has certainly achieved her goal with this fabulous fragrance. With floral notes at it's heart, a delicious raspberry praline top note and scents of Golden Cypress and Himalayan Cedar Wood, this perfume is an extravaganza of woody freshness. The creation is is spellbinding, modern and playful – much like Anna's clothes! Image: @annasui . . . #museum #fashiontextilemuseum #fashiontextile #annasui #annasuicosmetics #perfume #perfumes #museumshop #fashionexhibition #textiledesign #fashionart #designerfashion #unicorn

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Fahrelnissa Zeid @ Tate Modern / until 15th October 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10am-6pm, Fri and Sat until 10pm

@ Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: £11.30 book online

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/fahrelnissa-zeid

Indulge in Zeid’s obsession with line and dazzling colour in this exhibition. Rediscover one of the greatest female artists of the 20th century in this first major retrospective.​ 🎨

Trained in both Paris and Istanbul, Fahrelnissa Zeid was an important figure in the Turkish avant-garde d Group in the early 1940s and the École de Paris (School of Paris) in the 1950s. Her vibrant abstract paintings are a synthesis of Islamic, Byzantine, Arab and Persian influences fused with European approaches to abstraction. Many of her abstract works are monumental and demand attention.

Zeid’s reputation as an artist was cemented in the 1950s when she was living between London and Paris and exhibiting extensively internationally. The artist also began experimenting with painting on turkey and chicken bones, which she later cast in polyester resin panels evocative of stained-glass windows. In the later years of her life she unexpectedly returned to figurative painting, creating stylised portraits of her friends and family.

Tunnel: The Archaeology of Crossrail @ Museum of London Docklands / until 3rd September 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10am – 6pm

@ Museum of London Docklands, No1 Warehouse, West India Quay, London E14 4AL

Free entry

www.museumoflondon.org.uk/museum-london-docklands/whats-on/exhibitions/tunnel-archaeology-crossrail

The most complete range of archaeological objects unearthed by Crossrail, Europe’s largest infrastructure project, is on display alongside the story of this great feat of engineering in a major exhibition.

The construction of London’s newest railway, which will be known as the Elizabeth line when services begin in 2018, has given archaeologists a unique chance to explore some of the city’s most historically important sites. Since work began in 2009, the project has undertaken one of the most extensive archaeological programmes ever in the UK, with over 10,000 artefacts shining a light on almost every important period of the Capital’s history. Read more about the archaeology behind the exhibition from the curator, Jackie Keily.

The wide variety of items on display explores 8,000 years of human history, revealing the stories of Londoners ranging from Mesolithic tool makers and inhabitants of Roman Londinium to those affected by the Great Plague of 1665.

These finds were discovered in locations as diverse as suburban Abbey Wood in the south east, through Canary Wharf, across to Liverpool Street, Tottenham Court Road and ending in Westbourne Park and Acton. The finds sit against a backdrop telling the engineering story of the largest infrastructure project currently underway in Europe, with key facts and figures presented throughout.

Ashley Bickerton: Ornamental Hysteria @ Newport Street Gallery / until 20th August 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Tuesday – Sunday 10am – 6pm
Closed on Mondays

@ Newport Street Gallery, Newport Street, London SE11 6AJ

Free entry

www.newportstreetgallery.com/exhibitions/ashley-bickerton

Spanning more than three decades of Bickerton’s career and features 51 works, including a significant display of new and previously unexhibited pieces. It is the artist’s first UK show since 2009 and runs throughout all six spaces at Newport Street Gallery.

Bickerton moved to New York in 1982 and after working as a painting assistant to Jack Goldstein, he emerged as a key figure on the newly exploding East Village art scene. Within the context of the culture of commodification sweeping America he rose to prominence as part of an amorphous movement that was branded ‘Neo-Geometric Conceptualism’. Alongside artists such as Haim Steinbach and Jeff Koons, Bickerton endeavoured to reframe the practice of art production in response to the new, seductive mechanisms of desire at work in society.

Bickerton abandoned New York in 1993, eventually settling in Bali, where he still lives and works. Whilst a number of his themes prevailed, the materiality of his work shifted dramatically after this self-imposed exile from the urban environment.

Both in materiality and content, Bickerton’s work resists categorisation. On the diversity of his mediums – photocollage, appropriated image, digital image, paint and sculpture – he states: “Painting is far too cartoony and lacks the backbone of factuality; photography is too clinical and incapable of loony launches into the ether; and sculpture can be just downright presumptuous. […] Only in their combination do I find comfort.”

Bickerton’s conceptual commitment to intersectionality extends to his subject matter; his audacious and technically complex assemblages are predicated on themes of opposition and duality, for example representation and reality, creativity and commodity, nature and artifice, idyll and apocalypse. This is evident in his earlier work on display in gallery 1, which offers a sardonic critique of contemporary consumer culture and the commodification of the ‘art object’ via steel and aluminium wall-mounted ‘Culturescapes’ from the ‘Logo’ and ‘Non-Word Word’ series. Galleries 3 and 4 are dominated by Bickerton’s ‘Sea’ and ‘Landscapes’ – overblown and incongruous, they contain ephemera from the anthroposphere in the simulated shells of transportation devices. In part, these “truly contemporary” landscapes might be read as a dystopian view of the devastating impact of man on the ecosphere.

Throughout his career, Bickerton has challenged the relevancy of traditional art-historical tropes. His ‘self-portraits’ similarly parody the mythological figure of ‘the artist’, who is represented in the guise of the brands he chooses to endorse in Tormented Self-Portrait: Susie at Arles (25 Years) (2014) and as a five-bodied, technicoloured serpent in the monumental 5 Snake Heads (2009), on display in Newport Street’s double-height gallery 2.

Bickerton’s practice evolved in the late 90s to incorporate digital image and photography. In portraits such as Smiling Woman (2009), models (often family members and friends) are heavily made-up and photographed, then distorted in Photoshop before the image is printed on canvas and re-painted. These paintings are amongst Bickerton’s most overtly satirical, presenting lurid, constructed visions of life on a generic Pacific / Caribbean island.

Richard Wilson: Stealing Space @ Annely Juda Fine Art / 25th March 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Monday–Friday 10:00–18:00
Saturday 11:00–17:00

@ Annely Juda Fine Art, 4th Floor, 23 Dering Street, London W1S 1AW

Free entry

www.annelyjudafineart.co.uk

The artist’s first at the gallery and his first solo show in London since unveiling his major site-specific work, Slipstream, at Heathrow Airport’s Terminal 2. The exhibition features four new works, two of which are in direct response to the gallery’s internal and external architecture.

Works in this exhibition dominate the gallery’s space and stand, in places, above the height of the architectural beams. In the main room, Wilson has created a sculpture of a slice of the negative space or “space between” the hallway and staircase leading to the gallery’s main entrance. Partial details of a doorway, steps or a bannister in negative form are visible on the sculpture which sits straight on the ground at a tilted angle, offering a reassessment of the perhaps completely unnoticed yet familiar surroundings the viewer has just encountered. Block of Dering, meanwhile, takes the façade of the gallery building at 23 Dering Street and reconfigures it into a near-cube. Even the gallery’s signage can be made out in this sculpture which presents the local architecture in an entirely new way.

In the second room, a sculpture delineates the “space between” an area of Wilson’s home in South East London whilst Blocka Flats takes a piece of household furniture reconfigured into a form reminiscent of an urban landscape on a micro scale, the very same landscape which Wilson refers to in other works on a 1:1 scale. Two preparatory sketches for each work hang near their sculptural counterparts, whilst in the final room, Wilson shows maquettes of past works and those not yet realised.

Richard Wilson is a world-renowned British artist whose architectural interventions have won him acclaim throughout his career. Wilson rose to prominence in 1987 when his installation, 20:50 – consisting of a room filled to waist height with reflective sump oil – was shown at Matt’s Gallery in London and purchased by The Saatchi Gallery. Wilson has gone on to create a series of predominantly site-specific works, most recently Slipstream (2014), which stands at an impressive 78 meters at Heathrow Airport’s Terminal 2. Wilson was appointed visiting research professor at the University of East London in 2004, elected as a member of the Royal Academy in 2006 and in 2008 was awarded an honorary doctorate at the University of Middlesex. He has created permanent and temporary works at prominent locations worldwide and his works have been shown at institutions such as The Serpentine Gallery, London; Saatchi Gallery, London; The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; National Gallery of Australia, Canberra and Museu d’Art Contemporani, Barcelona.

“I need that initial thing from the real world because I’ve always been concerned with the way you can alter someone’s perception, knock their view off kilter. And to do that I need to start with something we think we understand.”

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