Tag: exhibitions (page 1 of 21)

Martine Syms: Grand Calme at Sadie Coles until 20 October 2018

+ (1|The world is crumbling and depressing, how can I feel happy about anything.)
– It will be like the first warm day after a brutal winter and you greet the sun on your face.

Close my eyes and pretend I don’t exist.

I want to “cultivate a sense of privilege.”

+ (2|Kanye sliders.)
– I’m That Bitch. I did some cocaine and was worried I kept taking

too much in the rotation.

When I don’t work I start to slip away.

– Vaporizer or bong?

+ (@Vaporizer)
– I want to get rid of the interface the phone and just talk without having to dial.

+ (@Bong)

– I forget what else happened, great parties, lots of shrooms, saving one hit for the weekend. I went to this one meeting totally high. It was the perfect use of drugs.

+ *

* == 1 => {@ question1}
* == 2 => {@ question2}

– + question1

– – I hate how someone can just insert themselves into your life. Suddenly you’re thinking about them and wondering what they’re doing, wanting to chat, share things.

– + question2

– – It seems like I have to fight for little scraps while everyone else gets the whole world and by everyone else I just mean white people.

– ^buttons (“My horoscope is like bitch CALM DE FUCK DOWN.”,”Last week I texted My Husband about grabbing lunch or dinner. He didn’t respond for about ten minutes then asked ‘Do you want to go to Mexico…?'”)

www.sadiecoles.com/artists/44-martine-syms

Location:
Sadie Coles HQ, 62 Kingly Street, London W1B 5QN

Times:
Tuesday – Saturday 11am – 6pm

Price:
Free entry

Yuko Mohri at Camden Arts Centre until 16 September 2018

Following her residency at Camden Arts Centre in 2016, Yuko Mohri returns with a new installation that orchestrates relations between electromagnetic force-fields, patterns of light moving through water and a reconfigured Yamaha reed organ from 1934. Developed responsively to the architecture and surrounding environment of the galleries, Mohri’s audio-spatial composition reveals the interconnectedness of man-made and natural processes, inviting non-human agents and chance factors to determine the score. 👐

In this new commission, error, improvisation and feedback figure in an acoustic environment that maps shifting relationships between material things and conceptual propositions. Music and sound are central to Mohri’s practice. Her involvement with the experimental music scene in Japan has included collaborations with Otomo Yoshihide and the internationally acclaimed composer, pianist and electronic musician Ryuichi Sakamoto. As part of Voluta, sound art pioneer Akio Suzuki will perform live in the gallery.

www.camdenartscentre.org/whats-on/view/mohri

Location:
Camden Arts Centre, Arkwright Road, London NW3 6DG

Times:
Tuesday – Sunday 10am – 6pm
Wednesdays until 9pm
Closed Mondays

Price:
Free entry

Frida Kahlo: Making Her Self Up at V&A until 4 November 2018

This exhibition presents an extraordinary collection of personal artefacts and clothing belonging to the iconic Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. 🇲🇽

Locked away for 50 years after her death, this collection has never before been exhibited outside Mexico.

www.vam.ac.uk/exhibitions/frida-kahlo-making-her-self-up

Location:
Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A), Cromwell Road, London SW7 2RL

Times:
10 am – 5:45 pm

Price:
£15 book online

Nøtel: Lawrence Lek & Kode9 at arebyte Gallery until 1 September 2018

Nøtel is an immersive, two-chapter, multimedia installation by London-based artist Lawrence Lek created in collaboration with electronic musician Kode9 (Steve Goodman). The project installation transforms the gallery into a marketing suite for the fictional Nøtel Corporation, advertising future plans for a global expansion of the hotel chain. The exhibition uses similar conventions of property marketing, including a video trailer and virtual reality, to conjure an image of a future luxury hotel as if it will be developed on site. 🌍 🌎 🌏

Set in a future London, where elite society no longer requires permanent housing but rather stays in temporary accommodation, Nøtel speculates on critical issues surrounding the newly-regenerated areas of the capital, including London City Island, where the exhibition’s first iteration is situated. Nøtel uses speculative architecture as a tool to imagine the future of these developments, and to address ideas around the politics of labour and an automated workforce, juxtaposed with notions of alienation and belonging.

Nøtel proposes a globalised, standardised way of living. Its alternative approach would alleviate the overpopulation of cities and the struggles of obtaining property, promoting an economic model which saves money by replacing humans with AI to complete menial tasks. Nøtel exposes the fine line between cost-efficiency and hyper-luxury – after checking in at the Nøtel, residents are left alone, broaching the question of hypothetical social-realism and what luxurious lifestyle means for future generations.

The site-specific installation relates to the rapid transformation of a post-industrial area into a new vision of urban living. The project was co-commissioned with Stroom Den Haag in the Netherlands, integrating ideas about European globalisation and the city’s political culture of international justice and conflict mediation, as well as its cyber security industry. The project will relocate to Stroom in September 2018. In this iteration, Nøtel is upgraded with militarised architectural features and high-tech surveillance, referring to the billion-euro industry under the moniker of Hague Security Delta – a think-tank, consultancy and interest group connecting governments to commercial tech corporations, weapons manufacturers and cyber agencies – at once representing the official future vision for the region and remaining completely invisible in the city’s architecture.

The project continues Lek’s exploration of architectural visualisation as a means to explore the critical and aesthetic issues surrounding urban development. The installation enables visitors to reflect on how digital rendering can manipulate the public’s perception of space.

CEØ statement: “Nøtel Corporation is proud to present our first virtual reality advertisement for the Nøtel, our flagship range of zerø-star™* hotels that embody the concept of fully-automated luxury. Designed by world-leading architects to accommodate today’s global nomads, you can rest assured that your secrecy and security is of the utmost importance. Why not indulge in the intelligent sound system at the piano bar, or bathe in the glow of our thermal spa?”

www.arebyte.com/lawrence-lek

Location:
Java House, 7 Botanic Square, London City Island, E14 0LG

Times:
Tuesday – Saturday 12pm – 6pm

Price:
Free entry

Bombay Sapphire CANVAS at N & C Showrooms until Saturday 21 July 2018

A destination to inspire and enable creative self-expression, you can join artists in the transformation of a blank space into a living work of art. 🎨 🍸

Discover mixology as an art form and explore the endless possibilities for creating personal twists on cocktails with Bombay Sapphire.

All ticket proceeds go to Developing Artists, a registered charity working to support the arts in post-conflict nations and deprived communities. Their projects connect people and institutions in some of the world’s most disadvantaged areas with an international network of arts organisations and practitioners.

Developing Artists strengthens underprivileged and marginalised communities by providing constructive outlets for their creative life, and transformative long-term opportunities for self-expression and professional development.

www.bombaysapphire.com

www.developingartists.org.uk

Location:
Bombay Sapphire CANVAS, N & C Showrooms, 3- 10 Shoreditch High Street, London E1 6PG

Times:
From 7pm

Price:
From £12 book online

Juno Calypso: What To Do With A Million Years at TJ Boulting until 23 June 2018

Known for her iconic photographic series of self-portraits in ‘The Honeymoon Suite’, for this new body of work Calypso discovered a surreal and unique location – an underground house in Nevada, USA. 📍 💣

Built by Avon cosmetics founder and director Jerry Henderson in the 1960s, with the advent of the cold war he had decided to take the premise of a bunker in the back yard one stage further. The multimillionaire moved 26 feet underground into a 16,000 square foot luxury space, designed to withstand virtually any disaster and protect from almost any intruder. Above ground the original entrance is a cave-like hole but down below, as befits a Vegas home, there is an all-pink bedroom, crystal and gold fixtures in the bathrooms, a swimming pool, waterfall and hot tub, and hand-painted murals of outdoor scenery on the perimeter of the home and garden. As the interior had never been exposed to sunlight or outside air it was perfectly preserved, with no dust or sun damage on the furniture and wallpaper, and today the home remains in tact and as Henderson and his wife Mary built it. A computerised lighting system simulates daytime, sunset, dusk and night, complete with stars and the moon.

After Jerry died Mary moved to a newly built house directly above ground but died herself shortly after. The underground house is now unoccupied but kept in immaculate condition by a caretaker living alone above ground. As Calypso began her stay, sleeping and working alone downstairs, she immersed herself in the surroundings of the underground house and staged self-portraits in the different rooms. Whilst there she became aware that the current owners were in fact a mystery group with an enthusiasm for immortality. A stash of pamphlets found in the house detailing the latest innovations in cryonics from the 1960s to the present day served as inspiration, adding to the spirit of preservation running through the location’s past and present. What began as a house built off the fortune of a well-known cosmetics company, incorporating the pursuit of beauty and preservation of the living, had since taken a disturbing detour to become an eerie trophy of those who were more concerned with eternal life.

www.tjboulting.com/exhibitionspage/506/what-to-do-with-a-million-years

Location:
TJ Boulting, 59 Riding House Street, London W1W 7EG

Times:
Tuesday – Saturday, 11am – 6pm

Price:
Free entry

Picturing Forgotten London at London Metropolitan Archives until Wednesday 31 October 2018

London is a restless city, ever changing and evolving. Cranes and building sites crowd the landscape as new buildings rise. Yet traces of our forgotten past peep through on almost every street, whether intentionally preserved or incidentally left behind. Our exhibition uncovers London’s lost buildings, places that were once the toast of the capital or an important part of everyday life, left behind by successive generations of Londoners. Drawings, engravings, photographs, maps and films sit alongside contemporary recollections and bring together a surprising record of the capital, from the 1500s to the twentieth century. 📷 🗺

Picturing Forgotten London will take you on a journey of discovery through the capital’s past. Meet us at the shot tower next to Waterloo Bridge and travel across the river to The Devil’s Acre, a notorious neighbourhood next to the Palace of Westminster. In the East End we’ll visit the gothic magnificence of Columbia Market in Bethnal Green and encounter London’s first Chinatown in Limehouse. In the west we’ll shop at the Soho Bazaar and ride on the Great Wheel in Earl’s Court, before a night of entertainment at Wyld’s Monster Globe in Leicester Square.

From coaching inns to horse markets, riverside mansions to ragged schools, images created by a wide variety of artists, antiquarians and organisations will appear together for the first time to tell the story of London’s forgotten buildings.

www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/things-to-do/london-metropolitan-archives/news-events/Pages/picturing-forgotten-london

Location:
London Metropolitan Archives, 40 Northampton Road, Clerkenwell, London EC1R 0HB

Times:
Various check online for details

Price:
Free entry

Print! Tearing It Up at Somerset House until 22 August 2018

Explore the history and impact of the British independent magazine scene today in Print! Tearing It Up. This exhibition charts the evolution of polemic and progressive print publications and celebrates the current diverse industry of innovative independent magazines. 📖 📚

Beginning with BLAST, the Vorticist journal produced in June 1914, the exhibition traverses through the pacifist Peace News of 1930s, the biting satire of Private Eye (first published in the 1960s and still Britain’s best-selling current affairs magazine), the seminal feminist magazine founded in the 1970s Spare Rib, the cult-pop phenomenon of The Face in the 1980s and 90s and the D.I.Y zines created by teenage feminist collectives into the new millennium.

www.somersethouse.org.uk/whats-on/print-tearing-it-up

Location:
Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 1LA

Times:
Mon, Tue, Sat and Sun 10am – 6pm
Wed – Fri 11am – 8pm

Tickets:
Free

Inside Arc at Fashion Space Gallery until 28 July 2018

Archives are usually repositories of objects, not intended for further use, rarely displayed in static exhibitions or museum cases. 👗 👘 👚

The Arc is a working archive, consisting of garments, accessories and other paraphernalia amassed by designer Jennefer Osterhoudt. Many items are by John Galliano and Alexander McQueen, with whom she worked very closely from the beginning of their careers and throughout their time at Givenchy, as an accessories designer in Paris during the 1990s. Created by stylist Nick Royal, this constantly expanding collection is regularly frequented by established designers and stylists who use it for editorial photoshoots and campaigns.

This exhibition highlights the eccentricities and rarities from this archive, pieces that as much embody the processes behind creating elaborate toiles in expensive fabrics as reveal complex and labour-intensive techniques used by high fashion. Various personal items sit aside rare handmade invitations, crafted prototypes and toiles that made it into production and select examples are shown alongside a wall of photographs of her own vast shoe collection.

Showcasing these pieces reveals that an archive can be as much about preserving objects for posterity but as a resource to inform future image-makers as they reinterpret ideas from the not-so-distant past.

www.fashionspacegallery.com/exhibition/inside-arc

Location:
Fashion Space Gallery, London College of Fashion, 20 John Princes Street, London W1G 0BJ

Times:
Monday – Friday 10am – 6pm
Saturday 12pm – 4pm (during term time)
Sunday closed

Price:
Free entry

I Don’t Have Time for This: Hattie Stewart at Now Gallery until 25 June 2018

Visionary artist/illustrator Hattie Stewart’s very first commission that celebrates the best rising talent in the fields of visual arts and illustration. The gallery invites Stewart into the space to explore her vision as part of its on-going dedication to showcasing one-off experimental art and design. ❤️ 😉

Commissioned by Kaia Charles, NOW Gallery’s Cultural Curator, this new exhibition of Stewart’s work will allow the viewer the opportunity to engage with it like never before. Fully immersive, I Don’t Have Time For This invites viewers to participate intimately with Stewart’s legendary doodle-bombing illustrations, becoming part of an illustrated fantasy world that results in a short and memorable break from reality.

The crux of the exhibition is a bold, escapist, large scale floor- based artwork that invites the viewer to make time. Recline, look up and cross over into Stewart’s fictional universe. Made up of Stewart’s subversive style references; psychedelic art of the 60’s and the comic absurdity of hybrid post-modern classics like Who Framed Roger Rabbit, this large scale installation features a mix of characters, patterns and galaxies, giving the feeling that the artwork is alive. Through densely packed mirrored illustrative detail, the viewer will be able to float in space, lie in a field of flowers and even ‘fly’.

In recent years Stewart’s notoriety has increased due to her personal project titled ‘doodle-bombing’ where she draws over the covers of influential publications such as Interview, Vogue, i:D and Playboy. Part homage and part satire, this ongoing personal project has formed the basis for most of her commercial projects and endeavours, avoiding a more conventional illustrative style. Stewart’s work is bold and experimental in application and sees her breaking boundaries within the field of illustration.

I Don’t Have Time For This marks the debut of NOW Gallery Young Artist programme, which aims to work with artists who have an unusual approach and standout visual aesthetic, to create a unique vision for the gallery space. As part of the on-going regeneration of Greenwich Peninsula, this programme underpins the area’s commitment to fostering creativity to build a sense of place and community, offering a blank canvas that allows those who visit and settle a chance to imagine, create and build; an opportunity to create a new London.

Since graduating from Kingston University in 2010, Hattie has created a varied portfolio having worked with creatives such as Roman Coppola and for artists like SZA, Ariana Grande and Kylie Minogue. With a vibrant, tongue in cheek visual identity, she is a self-proclaimed ‘professional doodler’ with a unique and playful illustration style that extends itself fluidly through the worlds of advertising, art and fashion. She has worked with varied clients including but not limited to – MTV, Hunter, House of Holland, Nike, Apple Music, Marc by Marc Jacobs, MAC Cosmetics, Pepsi, and Adidas. She also recently launched her very own Doodlebomb sticker book – allowing others to decorate their lives as she does her own.

www.nowgallery.co.uk/exhibitions/3959

Location:
Weekdays 10am – 7pm
Saturday 10am – 5pm
Sunday 11am – 4pm

Times:
NOW Gallery, The Gateway Pavilions, Peninsula Square, Greenwich Peninsula, London SE10 0SQ

Price:
Free entry, book free tickets online

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