Tag: exhibitions (page 1 of 20)

Print! Tearing It Up at Somerset House until 22 August 2018

Explore the history and impact of the British independent magazine scene today in Print! Tearing It Up. This exhibition charts the evolution of polemic and progressive print publications and celebrates the current diverse industry of innovative independent magazines. 📖 📚

Beginning with BLAST, the Vorticist journal produced in June 1914, the exhibition traverses through the pacifist Peace News of 1930s, the biting satire of Private Eye (first published in the 1960s and still Britain’s best-selling current affairs magazine), the seminal feminist magazine founded in the 1970s Spare Rib, the cult-pop phenomenon of The Face in the 1980s and 90s and the D.I.Y zines created by teenage feminist collectives into the new millennium.

www.somersethouse.org.uk/whats-on/print-tearing-it-up

Location:
Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 1LA

Times:
Mon, Tue, Sat and Sun 10am – 6pm
Wed – Fri 11am – 8pm

Tickets:
Free

Inside Arc at Fashion Space Gallery until 28 July 2018

Archives are usually repositories of objects, not intended for further use, rarely displayed in static exhibitions or museum cases. 👗 👘 👚

The Arc is a working archive, consisting of garments, accessories and other paraphernalia amassed by designer Jennefer Osterhoudt. Many items are by John Galliano and Alexander McQueen, with whom she worked very closely from the beginning of their careers and throughout their time at Givenchy, as an accessories designer in Paris during the 1990s. Created by stylist Nick Royal, this constantly expanding collection is regularly frequented by established designers and stylists who use it for editorial photoshoots and campaigns.

This exhibition highlights the eccentricities and rarities from this archive, pieces that as much embody the processes behind creating elaborate toiles in expensive fabrics as reveal complex and labour-intensive techniques used by high fashion. Various personal items sit aside rare handmade invitations, crafted prototypes and toiles that made it into production and select examples are shown alongside a wall of photographs of her own vast shoe collection.

Showcasing these pieces reveals that an archive can be as much about preserving objects for posterity but as a resource to inform future image-makers as they reinterpret ideas from the not-so-distant past.

www.fashionspacegallery.com/exhibition/inside-arc

Location:
Fashion Space Gallery, London College of Fashion, 20 John Princes Street, London W1G 0BJ

Times:
Monday – Friday 10am – 6pm
Saturday 12pm – 4pm (during term time)
Sunday closed

Price:
Free entry

I Don’t Have Time for This: Hattie Stewart at Now Gallery until 25 June 2018

Visionary artist/illustrator Hattie Stewart’s very first commission that celebrates the best rising talent in the fields of visual arts and illustration. The gallery invites Stewart into the space to explore her vision as part of its on-going dedication to showcasing one-off experimental art and design. ❤️ 😉

Commissioned by Kaia Charles, NOW Gallery’s Cultural Curator, this new exhibition of Stewart’s work will allow the viewer the opportunity to engage with it like never before. Fully immersive, I Don’t Have Time For This invites viewers to participate intimately with Stewart’s legendary doodle-bombing illustrations, becoming part of an illustrated fantasy world that results in a short and memorable break from reality.

The crux of the exhibition is a bold, escapist, large scale floor- based artwork that invites the viewer to make time. Recline, look up and cross over into Stewart’s fictional universe. Made up of Stewart’s subversive style references; psychedelic art of the 60’s and the comic absurdity of hybrid post-modern classics like Who Framed Roger Rabbit, this large scale installation features a mix of characters, patterns and galaxies, giving the feeling that the artwork is alive. Through densely packed mirrored illustrative detail, the viewer will be able to float in space, lie in a field of flowers and even ‘fly’.

In recent years Stewart’s notoriety has increased due to her personal project titled ‘doodle-bombing’ where she draws over the covers of influential publications such as Interview, Vogue, i:D and Playboy. Part homage and part satire, this ongoing personal project has formed the basis for most of her commercial projects and endeavours, avoiding a more conventional illustrative style. Stewart’s work is bold and experimental in application and sees her breaking boundaries within the field of illustration.

I Don’t Have Time For This marks the debut of NOW Gallery Young Artist programme, which aims to work with artists who have an unusual approach and standout visual aesthetic, to create a unique vision for the gallery space. As part of the on-going regeneration of Greenwich Peninsula, this programme underpins the area’s commitment to fostering creativity to build a sense of place and community, offering a blank canvas that allows those who visit and settle a chance to imagine, create and build; an opportunity to create a new London.

Since graduating from Kingston University in 2010, Hattie has created a varied portfolio having worked with creatives such as Roman Coppola and for artists like SZA, Ariana Grande and Kylie Minogue. With a vibrant, tongue in cheek visual identity, she is a self-proclaimed ‘professional doodler’ with a unique and playful illustration style that extends itself fluidly through the worlds of advertising, art and fashion. She has worked with varied clients including but not limited to – MTV, Hunter, House of Holland, Nike, Apple Music, Marc by Marc Jacobs, MAC Cosmetics, Pepsi, and Adidas. She also recently launched her very own Doodlebomb sticker book – allowing others to decorate their lives as she does her own.

www.nowgallery.co.uk/exhibitions/3959

Location:
Weekdays 10am – 7pm
Saturday 10am – 5pm
Sunday 11am – 4pm

Times:
NOW Gallery, The Gateway Pavilions, Peninsula Square, Greenwich Peninsula, London SE10 0SQ

Price:
Free entry, book free tickets online

John Chamberlain: ENTIRELYFEARLESS at Gagosian until 26 May 2018

Chamberlain’s distinctive metal sculptures, often made of crushed and torqued automobile steel, reveal both the stately grace and the expressive plasticity of industrial materials. Exploring the interplay of color, sheen, weight, and balance, Chamberlain taps into the dynamic energy of Abstract Expressionism, the pre-manufactured elements of Pop and Minimalism, and the provocative curves and swells of high baroque. 🚗

In this exhibition, large-scale floor sculptures and wall-mounted works made over the course of four decades attest to the seemingly infinite variations of shape and color that Chamberlain explored throughout his career.

The centerpiece, ENTIRELYFEARLESS (2009), towers over the viewer, its scrunched red sides bracketed by car bumpers in shiny silver chrome. As fluid as folded drapery, and arresting as a marble monument, it subverts expectations of both abstraction and representation, while exuding a subtle figural quality. In BISHOPBUDD (2009), a nest of twisted metal strips sits atop a huddle of larger contorted planes of black and white steel—the robust, doming form recalling both an elegant tree and a menacing mushroom cloud. Chamberlain fostered a keen appreciation for poetry during the year he spent at Black Mountain College in 1955, and began to consider language as an integral part of his aesthetic approach. His dynamic titles—usually in all caps without spacing—often act as semiotic echoes of the sculptures themselves.

www.gagosian.com/exhibitions/john-chamberlain

Location:
Gagosian, 17–19 Davies Street, London W1K 3DE

Times:
Tuesday – Saturday 10am – 6pm

Price:
Free entry

Sense of Space at Broadgate until 18 May 2018

This spring, activate your senses and rescue your mind. As the weather warms up and blue skies return to the city, meander, marvel and move in art at Exchange Square in Broadgate. 📸💁‍♀️

At the heart of spring is our free, engaging and multi-sensory Sense Of Space art pop-up installation comprising four very different rooms designed to engage the senses and transport you from the hustle of the city.

Featuring the joyous work of Mr Doodle, human-activated art, an ode to a Japanese blossom garden and a tranquil Zen room – this is set to be one of London’s most unmissable events. Surrounding the Sense Of Space pop-up is Supermundane’s iconic graphics welcoming visitors to Exchange Square.

RSVP on Facebook

Events:

5 April-18 May Sense Of Space at Exchange Square

5 April-18 May The Art Bar at Exchange Square

5, 6 & 7 April Enter the wonderful world of Mr Doodle

10 & 11 April Meet the amazing Supermundane

10, 17 & 24 April, 1 and 8 May  Morning yoga with Annie Clarke

18 & 25 April, 2, 9 and 16 May  Silent Nights cinema

Until 25 May Hornby Tantra | Collaborative Works III : Proposals

www.broadgate.co.uk/SenseOfSpace

Location:
Broadgate, Exchange Square, 1-2 Exchange Arcade, London EC2M 3WA

Times:
Monday – Saturday 11am – 8pm
12 – 6pm Sunday

Tickets:
Free

Marianna Simnett and Ericka Beckman at Zabludowicz Collection until 8 July 2018

British artist Marianna Simnett creates fable-like film, performance, sound and light installations that examine the sense of intimacy yet anxious unfamiliarity we experience with our own bodies. She particularly focuses on the means we deploy to control these bodies, both technological and cultural. The exhibition presents a group of recent work from the Zabludowicz Collection: three films The Udder (2014), Blood (2015), and Blue Roses (2016) – installed as a trilogy for the first time – alongside a sound and light installation Faint with Light (2016).

Simnett’s films unfold from multiple, occasionally impossible perspectives (from within dreams or personifying internal organs), reflecting the fluidity of our identities as they are embodied and performed. Consistently working with untrained actors, many of the individuals Simnett meets through her research become collaborators, performing heightened versions of themselves within the films. Her works often provoke a visceral reaction, featuring unflinching depictions of many commonplace phobias such as needles, cockroaches, blood, and of medical procedures which the artist has herself undergone. They present the body as both monstrous and clinical, combining scientific description with the cathartic fantasy of musicals and horror genres. Simnett writes songs, performed by her cast, that lend an air of innocence and lightness to her densely layered storytelling.

Simnett’s works seek to create in-between states that defy and threaten easy categorisation by the patriarchal social structures that govern our bodies and identities. It’s an approach that throws into doubt binary categories such as innocence and cruelty, purity and contamination, desire and revulsion, and even life and death.

Marianna Simnett opens alongside a solo exhibition by American artist Ericka Beckman. The exhibitions continue the Collection’s 2018 focus on artists’ film and video examining ideas of embodiment and performance of identity in relation to technology. Beckman and Simnett have each established unique approaches to storytelling that draw upon fairy tale archetypes and their works share an interest in how gender is constructed and its relationship to mechanisms of desire and capitalist consumption. Their works reflect the impact of new technologies – robotics, virtual reality, bio-medical – on both the built environment and subjectivity. In addition, both artists have developed distinctive uses of sound in their work as a pre-linguistic tool for communication. They utilise tropes of the musical, from the abstract repetitions and rhythms of playground chants and nursery rhymes, to the cathartic effect of song as a narrative device.

In her first major solo exhibition in the UK, Zabludowicz Collection is pleased to present four seminal works from the Collection by American artist Ericka Beckman that span over 30 years of genre-defying filmmaking. Beckman’s work consistently treats film as a performance medium, and draws on the pioneering energy of her years at CalArts and the do-it-yourself sensibilities of New York’s Downtown Scene in the late 1970s and early 80s. It also astutely anticipates the social and cultural impact of video gaming and online networks over recent decades. Shot on 16mm, with all the animation and visual effects being constructed in camera through multiple exposures, Beckman’s films create narratives using the pedagogic and competitive structures of games. They playfully reveal the conditions of gender and identity formation in relation to labour, leisure, architecture and capital.

Ericka Beckman opens alongside a solo exhibition by British artist Marianna Simnett. The exhibitions continue the Collection’s 2018 focus on artists’ film and video and examining ideas of embodiment and performance of identity in relation to technology. Beckman and Simnett have each established unique approaches to storytelling that draw upon fairy tale archetypes and their works share an interest in how gender is constructed and its relationship to mechanisms of desire and capitalist consumption. Their works reflect the impact of new technologies – robotics, virtual reality, bio-medical – on both the built environment and subjectivity. In addition, both artists have developed distinctive uses of sound in their work as a pre-linguistic tool for communication. They utilise tropes of the musical from the abstract repetitions and rhythms of playground chants and nursery rhymes, to the cathartic effect of song as a narrative device.

www.zabludowiczcollection.com/exhibitions/view/marianna-simnett

Location:
Zabludowicz Collection, 176 Prince of Wales Road, London NW5 3PT

Times:
Thursday – Sunday 12-6pm

Tickets:
Free entry

Isle of Dogs the exhibition at The Store until 5 April 2018

The hand-crafted sets of Wes Anderson’s dystopian film Isle of Dogs giving you a chance to explore his vision of Japan in 20 years time. 🇯🇵 🌆

Anderson’s fictional city, Megasaki, along with its autocratic puppet mayor, Kobayashi, a man with a vendetta against dogs. In the stop-motion animation, Kobayashi exiles all canines to Trash Island – on show in all its rubbish-laden glory – where they form clans and fight for food. Meanwhile the mayor’s 12-year-old nephew embarks on a mission to save his beloved dog Spot and turn around the fortunes of all his furry friends.

17 original sets take over the ground floor of The Store. These meticulously crafted visions of Japanese culture are a model architecture-lover’s dream – the towering metropolis has been created in extraordinary detail, down to pot plants and the requisite red lanterns. There’s even a wood-panelled bar, stocked with medically enhanced sake. Meanwhile, you can almost spell the festering rubbish on Trash Island.

Food (Japanese Ramen) and drink will be available to purchase from the ‘Noodle Bar’ from midday. Sake cocktails and bar snacks available during late night openings on Thursday/Friday.

A post shared by The Spaces (@thespacesmag) on

www.thespaces.com/2018/03/22/inside-the-insane-sets-of-wes-andersons-isle-of-dogs

Location:
The Store, 180 The Strand, London WC2R 1EA

Times:
11am – 7pm Saturday – Wednesday
11am – 10pm Thursday and Friday

Price:
Free entry

The Other Art Fair: presented by Saatchi Art at Victoria House until 25 March 2018

UK’s favourite fair to meet and buy art direct from the very best emerging and undiscovered artists. Presenting 130 of the best emerging artists handpicked by a committee of art industry experts. 👩‍🎨 🎨 🖌

Celebrated for its unique visitor experience, The Other Art Fair’s Spring London edition will continue to delight and inspire art lovers with a tightly curated and distinctive programme of fair features that will create a platform for the ‘unexpected’ at the fair.

RSVP on Facebook

www.theotherartfair.com

Location:
Victoria House, Southampton Row, London WC1A 2QP

Times:
Saturday 11am – 7pm
Sunday 11am – 6pm

Price:
From £8 book online

Rhythm & Reaction: The Age of Jazz in Britain at Two Temple Place until 22 April 2018

Marking 100 years of jazz in the UK, the exhibition explores the impact that jazz had on Britons from 1918. 🎷

Jazz provoked reactions ranging from devotion to abhorrence when the idea, and then the sound, of the music first entered the consciousness of the British public in the aftermath of the First World War. Visiting American groups such as the Original Dixieland Jazz Band and the Southern Syncopated Orchestra offered Britons their first chance to experience the music live.

The exhibition highlights how the new jazz sound in post-War nightclubs and dancehalls provided exciting and dynamic material for British artists. Bold depictions of lively dancers by William Roberts and Frank Dobson, will be displayed alongside the Harlem-inspired paintings for which Edward Burra, one of Britain’s foremost Modernist painters, was well-known.

The growing interest in jazz brought black and white musicians, artists and audiences together, and was crucial in influencing changes in British society, moving from stereotypes descended from the minstrel show to a more nuanced understanding of and interest in African American and black British culture.

The exhibition brings together painting, prints, cartoons, textiles and ceramics, moving film, instruments and the all-important jazz sound, to explicitly examine the influence of jazz on British art, design and wider society.

www.twotempleplace.org/exhibitions/rhythm-and-reaction

Location:
Two Temple Place, London WC2R 3BD

Times:
Monday 10am – 4.30pm
Tuesday closed
Wednesday 10am – 9pm
Thursday 10am – 4.30pm
Friday 10am – 4.30pm
Saturday 10am – 4.30pm
Sunday 11am – 4.30pm

Price:
Free entry

Counter Investigations: Forensic Architecture at ICA until 6 May 2018

A survey exhibition of the independent research agency dedicated to the pursuit of public accountability through scientific and aesthetic means. 🔍

Counter Investigations is a survey exhibition of the work of Forensic Architecture, an independent research agency based at Goldsmiths, University of London.

‘Forensic Architecture’ is not only the name of the agency but a form of investigative practice that traverses architectural, journalistic, legal and political fields, and moves from theoretical examination to practical application.

In recent years Forensic Architecture has undertaken a series of investigations internationally into state crimes and human rights violations, spanning events within war zones and instances of politically and racially motivated violence and killing outside of military conflict. These investigations have led to the contestation of accounts of events given by state authorities, affecting legal and human rights processes, giving rise to citizen tribunals and truth commissions, military, parliamentary and UN inquiries.

The work of the agency has responded to the widespread increase in availability of digital recording equipment, satellite imaging and remote sensing technology, alongside platforms for data sharing. While such developments have contributed to the complexity of forms of conflict and control, they have also enabled new means of monitoring. Grounded in the use of architecture as an ‘analytic device’, Forensic Architecture’s investigations employ spatial and material analysis, mapping and reconstruction, and extend outwards to overlay elements of witness testimony and the cumulative forms of visual documentation enabled by contemporary media.

Counter Investigations presents a selection of recent and new investigations by Forensic Architecture. These address cases including the racist murder of a man in Kassel, Germany by a member of a far-right group, and instances of deferred responsibility by state agencies that have contributed to the deaths of migrants at sea in the Mediterranean. As historically contextualised interrogations of contemporary social and political processes, these investigations put forward a form of ‘counter-forensics’. They serve as sites for the pursuit of public accountability through scientific and aesthetic means, in opposition to the monopolisation of narratives around events by state agencies.
The individual investigations presented function as anchors for public events, workshops and discussions, with the exhibition as the physical infrastructure for the curriculum of a short course in forensic architecture.

www.ica.art/whats-on/season/counter-investigations-forensic-architecture

Location:
ICA, The Mall, London SW1Y 5AH

Times:
Mon closed
Tuesday-Sunday 11am-9pm

Price:
£1 day membership, read more

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