Tag: free art shows

Crossroads: Kauffman, Judd and Morris at Sprüth Magers until 31 March 2018

The show presents six works from Kauffman’s fertile period of 1966—1971, when he addressed the issues of structure and form in painting, the use of industrial materials, painting’s relationship to the wall, and dematerialisation. His work is contextualised by the inclusion of the stack piece Untitled (Bernstein 80-4) (1980) and the floor piece Untitled, DSS 234 (1970) by Donald Judd and the two felt works Untitled (1968) and Fountain (1971) by Robert Morris, as well as supplemental materials from the Kauffman archives. The exhibition presents the three artists together for the first time in Europe, and is Kauffman’s debut exhibition with the gallery in London. 😍

Although primarily known as a Los Angeles based artist, Craig Kauffman had a long history of engagement with the New York scene. In 1967, Kauffman relocated to New York, encouraged by the successes of his recent exhibitions in the city. While there, he began a friendship with Donald Judd, the artist who coined the phrase “specific objects” to describe his own work, a format which operated between painting and sculpture. Like the work of Judd, Kauffman’s three-dimensional plastic paintings occupy this liminal category. Their volume suggests that they are sculpture, but their presence on the wall reinforces their status as paintings. The unity of colour and form, achieved through the use of industrial materials, is another point of similarity between the two artists’ objectives.

Kauffman’s move to New York also reignited his friendship with Robert Morris, whom he had met in San Francisco ten years earlier. Their frequent discussions resulted in a short lived collaboration for the exhibition Using Walls (Indoors) at the Jewish Museum in 1970, which remained open for only one day, and which Kauffman described as a combination of both of the artists’ ideas. Only a few years prior, Morris begun making process-oriented felt pieces, in which he hung strips of industrial felt on the wall and allowed gravity to determine their shape. This influenced Kauffman’s conception of his series of Loops, in which sheets of spray painted Plexiglas seem to casually droop over a wire.

In Kauffman’s work, the environment constantly shifts as the viewer moves around each object. The light that moves across the curved edges of each piece facilitates the full comprehension of their forms. This draws comparisons to Morris’s own textual formulations in his influential Notes on Sculpture series, which advocated a phenomenological reading of the art object, how they change under varying conditions of light and space. The coloured shadows of the hanging Loops and the cast plastic forms that project into space directly implicate both the viewer and their supports.

Two of the earliest works from 1966 demonstrate how Kauffman addressed some of the issues which were important to Minimalist art and theory: seriality, industrial multiples, and anonymity. But where the New Yorkers’ opted for material and formal austerity—Kauffman’s supple plastic works were coloured and full of curves.

This exhibition is curated by Frank Lloyd, and follows Craig Kauffman: Works from 1962 – 1964 in dialogue with Francis Picabia and Marcel Duchamp, Sprüth Magers debut of the gallery’s representation of the Estate of Craig Kauffman in Berlin in 2016. The show is timed to run concurrently with the gallery’s Los Angeles presentation of Robert Irwin, who, along with Kauffman, was a major force in the definition of art from Los Angeles in the 1960s.

www.spruethmagers.com

Location:
Sprüth Magers, 7 Grafton Street, Mayfair, London W1S 4EJ

Times:
Tue-Sat 11am-6pm

Price:
Free entry

Eddie Peake: Concrete Pitch at White Cube Bermondsey until 8 April 2018

Featuring new sculpture, painting, sound work and performance presented in an immersive and constructed environment. 🔊 🏙

The works weave autobiographical elements and an examination of self-identity with more general themes of desire, the body, architecture and urban landscape. The title ‘Concrete Pitch’ was inspired by the bare, concrete recreation ground in Finsbury Park in London where Peake grew up, which was used as a playground, a sports field, a meeting place for people of every age, class and ethnicity and location for encounters and scenarios of all kinds. Peake has said: ‘I used to treat things I did like graffiti and football and dance classes as not part of my art, then I had a sort of epiphany. I realised I want all those parts of my life in my art, and vice versa.’ For Peake, whose work can be located within a history of painting and object-making as well as more recent narratives of dance and performance art, the gallery can also be considered a stage; a place to orchestrate dramas of the everyday and to present the rich associative portrait of his childhood neighbourhood as a microcosm of urban, multicultural society.

Peake will be present in the gallery space throughout the exhibition, following a scheduled daily routine. Moving between various constructed spaces which include a private office and a triangular cell-like structure, accessible only by a tall ladder. The artist ‘plays’ himself, both offering up and dismantling the narrative of artistic ego, fictional protagonist and ‘real’ self. In another specially constructed room, visible behind a window, DJs from Kool London broadcast an online radio show during the exhibition. Broadcasting oldskool jungle and drum and bass from East London tower blocks since 1991, Kool FM is one of the longest running underground stations and provided the soundtrack to Peake’s adolescence.

The new, large-scale sound installation, Stroud Green Road runs through the gallery, consisting of a row of steel tables placed in a snaking line, just as the street of the same name runs through Peake’s neighbourhood. On their tray-like surfaces is an array of objects: small-scale sculptures as well as an eclectic selection of items purchased from shops on Stroud Green Road and several small speakers which emit a low, deep register like a wavering vibration or rattle. Composed by the artist using distorted samples and field recordings from the local area, this abstract soundscape creates a continuously looping hum, while a soft pink light floods the exhibition space. Continuing the theme of revealing and concealing, an airy white curtain hangs full-length from the ceiling, creating a natural spiralling passageway, in the centre of which a split-screen projection shows four dancers, each locked in an individual, looping sequence of complex, choreographed movement. The notion of the loop, a key motif within Peake’s work, is manifested in these repetitive movements, in the daily rituals the artist will be observing, in the sonic structure of the sound sculpture and in the music played by the Kool DJs. For Peake, these devices echo the entrapping loops of thought or behaviour associated with compulsion, obsession and depression.

In several new series of paintings, techniques of layering and masking are used to create vivid abstract compositions on canvas or hard, reflective stainless-steel panels. In one group, overlapping, spray-painted rectangles recall the urban patchwork of fly-posters, while in others, graffiti-like mark-making recedes into a bright void. This exploration of the void, whereby elements of the composition are left blank or undone creates works that reflect back to the viewer a sense ennui, even depression. In another group of oil on canvas works, a rainbow-coloured text defines the form of a head in profile spelling out the enigmatic slogans ‘A More Uncomfortable And Realistic History’, and ‘We To The Ramp Go For Relinquish Unearned Privileges And Powers’. Suggesting the direct, angry tone of graffiti, social media and urban music, these works are an expression of ideas that have formerly been implicit in Peake’s work.

www.whitecube.com/exhibitions/eddie_peake_bermondsey_2018

Location:
White Cube Bermondsey, 144 – 152 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ

Times:
Tuesday – Saturday 10am – 6pm
Sunday 12pm – 6pm

Price:
Free entry

Rise Art Prize at House of Vans until 25 February 2018

The most exciting contemporary artists from around the world are shown in a new public exhibition hosted by global art platform Rise Art. Perfect for art lovers and culture hounds. 👨‍🎨 👩‍🎨

Showcasing the works of 25 finalists from the inaugural Rise Art Prize, a global competition seeking to unearth new and established talent from around the world. The exhibition allows the public to experience these artists first hand, with exclusive talks and tours by top industry figures and curators.

Spanning works from UK and international contemporary artists across the globe, the exhibition is a one-stop-shop to discover the latest innovators in art, including incredible sculptures, photography, street art, paint and much more.

www.riseartprize.com/what-its-about

Location:
House of Vans, Arches, 228-232 Station Approach Road, Lambeth, London SE1 8SW

Times:
Thursday – Friday 4pm – 10pm
Saturday 10am – 8pm
Sunday 12pm – 6pm

Price:
Free entry

The Come Up by Charles Jeffrey at NOW Gallery until 11 February 2018

Charles Jeffrey, the Glaswegian designer, illustrator and creative, is NOW Gallery’s third fashion commission. Charles’ first solo exhibition, THE COME UP will be an interactive and three-dimensional representation of the Charles Jeffrey LOVERBOY brand and cult club night.

Based around Charles’ renowned illustrations, THE COME UP will explore these artworks amplified via new media. Showcased in a three-dimensional format, the exhibition will act as a manifestation of Charles’ mind. Charles’ emotive and vibrant illustrations will be interpreted afresh through large sculptural pieces that will hang from the gallery’s seven-meter ceiling. The sculptures will be a mix of PVC, fibreglass, chicken wire with papier-mache, and electrical tape, varying greatly in size.

As part of the installation, a series of shelves filled with mixed media artistic materials will be the setting of an interactive experience that will invite visitors to open up their alter egos and let creativity take over. Starting with a representation from Charles himself, the installation provides an opportunity for the visiting community to progress the structural artwork until it is complete. This relates back to a signature part of Charles’ illustrative work – repeated faces – as at the end, the installation will become a physical representation and exploration of the realm of identities and many faces who have been welcomed into the gallery to interact with THE COME UP, much like those who attend a LOVERBOY club night.

www.nowgallery.co.uk/exhibitions/the-come-up/

Location:
NOW Gallery, The Gateway Pavilions, Peninsula Square, Greenwich Peninsula, London SE10 0SQ

Times:
Mon – Fri 10am – 7pm
Sat – Sun 11am – 4pm

Price:
Free entry

Chroma at House of Vans from 29 November until 17 December 2017

In collaboration with award winning design and creative collective Studio PSK will be transforming the Tunnel One gallery space into an immersive light and play installation. 🔸🔻🔹▫️▪️

The entire exhibition – from the specially commissioned artworks, to the objects within it – use the same shade of red, green and blue. Lighting in the space is controlled by a bespoke musical score; when flooded with the changing red, green and blue light, an analogue ‘stop frame animation’ effect is created – making static images appear to move.

www.houseofvanslondon.com/events/calendar/events/house-of-vans-presents-chroma

Location:
The Arches, 228-232 Station Approach Road, Lambeth, London SE1 8SW

Times:
Thu – Fri 4pm – 10pm
Sat 10am – 8pm
Sun 12pm – 6pm

Price:
Free entry

John Akomfrah Purple at Barbican Curve until 7 January 2018

British artist and filmmaker, John Akomfrah creates his most ambitious piece to date – an immersive six-channel video installation addressing climate change, human communities and the wilderness. 📹 📺

At a time when, according to the UN, greenhouse gas emissions from human activities are at their highest levels in history, with people experiencing the significant impacts of climate change, including shifting weather patterns, rising sea level, and more extreme weather events, Akomfrah’s Purple brings a multitude of ideas into conversation. These include animal extinctions, the memory of ice, the plastic ocean and global warming. Akomfrah has combined hundreds of hours of archival footage with newly shot film and a hypnotic sound score to produce the video installation.

www.barbican.org.uk/whats-on/2017/event/john-akomfrah-purple

Doors:
Sat – Wed 11am – 8pm
Thu and Fri 11am – 9pm

Location:
Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS

Price:
Free!

Darryl Makes Comics (DMC) @ Hang–Up Gallery / until 25th June 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 12-00-18:00 (closed Mondays)

@ Hang-Up Gallery, 81 Stoke Newington Road, Stoke Newington, London N16 8AD

Free entry

www.hanguppictures.com/exhibition/dmc

East London’s Hang-Up Gallery are exclusively launching the new collection of works by Darryl ‘DMC’ McDaniels from Hip-Hop’s most notorious band, Run-DMC. The Art of DMC is the icon’s inaugural London exhibition and will host the new and unseen collection of ‘Darryl Makes Comics (DMC)’ Fine Art, a body of signed limited edition prints borne out of his love and deep passion for comics.

Darryl McDaniels is best known as the co-founding member of ‘Run DMC’. One of the major pioneers of hip-hop culture and arguably THE hottest rap act of the 1980s and 1990s, they are still loved today by millions around the world.

Comics and their superhero characters have always played a huge part in DMC’s life. In fact, many of the stories and speeches made by his favourite comic characters are the inspiration for his lyrics later created for Run DMC.

“I was a nervous little nerdy kid,” DMC says. “I didn’t want to get up in front of y’all and rhyme but then what gave me confidence out there on stage was pretending that I was the Hulk on the microphone.”

DMC, the debut title from Darryl Makes Comics, imagines an alternate history that blends traditional comic book storytelling with the pressures and anxieties of 1980’s NYC. Featuring collaborations with some of the hottest talent in comics and illustration today, a cool 80’s vibe and authentic street art, DMC is a superhero for those who need one most. The character dons his tracksuit, Adidas trainers and knuckle dusters to defend the city’s marginalised citizens against super villain and super hero alike.

For those in the know, you will delight in the tributes to DMC’s favourite comics you grew up with. For those that aren’t, you’ll gasp at the impact on the wall, the accessibility of the genre, and the fact that this was all started by a Hip-Hop legend millions grew up with.

About the artist:
Darryl McDaniels (Run DMC) dons his tracksuit and Adidas sneakers to defend the city’s marginalised citizens against super villain and super hero alike. DMC is a superhero for those who need one most… Darryl Makes Comics (DMC) is an independent comic book imprint created by Darryl McDaniels (Run DMC), collaborator and Editor-in-Chief Edgardo Miranda- Rodriguez, and music executive Riggs Morales. Darryl Makes Comics is dedicated to the idea that every walk of life has heroes and stories worth telling. Comics and their superhero characters have always played a huge part in DMC’s life. In fact, many of the stories and speeches made by his favourite comic characters are the inspiration for his lyrics later created for Run DMC.

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