Tag: free art

Evan Ifekoya: Ritual Without Belief at Gasworks until 2 September 2018

A solo exhibition and major new commission by London-based artist Evan Ifekoya. 🔊

Envisaged as a site of abundance in which various positions and propositions accumulate and intersect, the exhibition comprises an extended sound work and installation that explore how to create the conditions for polyvocality.

Lasting six hours – the length of Gasworks’ opening hours – Ifekoya describes their sound work as ‘a black queer algorithm across generations, locations and political affiliations’.

www.gasworks.org.uk/exhibitions/evan-ifekoya-2018-07-05

Location:
Gasworks, 155 Vauxhall Street, London SE11 5RH

Times:
Wednesday – Sunday 12pm – 6pm

Price:
Free entry

Katharina Grosse: Prototypes of Imagination at Gagosian until 27 July 2018

Widely known for her spectacular in situ paintings, in which explosive color is rendered directly onto architecture, interiors, and landscapes, Grosse embraces the events and incidents that arise as she works, opening up surfaces and spaces to the countless perceptual possibilities of the medium. Approaching painting as an experience in immersive subjectivity, she uses a spray gun, distancing the artistic act from the hand, and stylizing gesture as a propulsive mark. 🎨

In Prototypes of Imagination, Grosse reveals the ways in which painting catalyzes the unfolding of multiple dimensions on a single surface. Following Wunderbild, the imposing processional installation at the National Gallery in Prague, at the center of the exhibition is a single painting of oceanic scale on loose cloth. Working on huge expanses of flat cloth enables Grosse to execute very large-scale works in the studio in response to specific architectural conditions beyond it, in this case the Britannia Street gallery. This new approach creates a bridge between the studio canvases and the in situ paintings that she has been making over the last decade. In this abstract phantasmagoria, with its aqueous layers of vibrant, pulsating color, Grosse’s painterly gestures, and the inverted chromatic zones arising from her use of stencils of vaguely biomorphic form, assert entirely new spatial and temporal transformations.

Grosse continues this approach in works on stretched canvas, many of which contain rectangular fields that slide and tessellate like the windows and tabs of a browser, or dissolve into each other, creating ghostly organic silhouettes. Spatial tensions rise through shifts in chromatic temperature, and with stencils, folds, and other tools she allows for new patterns to emerge. Using stencils to either filter or completely block out areas of negative space, she creates opaque fields to be interrupted by solid geometries and ambiguous transparencies. The result sometimes recalls photograms wherein individual objects are placed on photosensitive paper to produce images using light alone. Here, paint replaces light, as Grosse saturates the exposed fabric with blazing, spectral mists. Each composition bears intimate traces of its creation, such as the smudges of paint where a stencil has been removed, or showers of drips suddenly severed in their resistance to gravitational pull. Surpassing the limits of pictorial logic, Grosse’s paintings are paradigms of vision; just as forms seem to materialize, their edges effervesce, pulling the viewer into their kaleidoscopic force field.

www.gagosian.com

Location:
Gagosian, 6-24 Britannia Street, London WC1X 9JD

Times:
Tue – Sat 10am – 6pm

Price:
Free entry

I Don’t Have Time for This: Hattie Stewart at Now Gallery until 25 June 2018

Visionary artist/illustrator Hattie Stewart’s very first commission that celebrates the best rising talent in the fields of visual arts and illustration. The gallery invites Stewart into the space to explore her vision as part of its on-going dedication to showcasing one-off experimental art and design. ❤️ 😉

Commissioned by Kaia Charles, NOW Gallery’s Cultural Curator, this new exhibition of Stewart’s work will allow the viewer the opportunity to engage with it like never before. Fully immersive, I Don’t Have Time For This invites viewers to participate intimately with Stewart’s legendary doodle-bombing illustrations, becoming part of an illustrated fantasy world that results in a short and memorable break from reality.

The crux of the exhibition is a bold, escapist, large scale floor- based artwork that invites the viewer to make time. Recline, look up and cross over into Stewart’s fictional universe. Made up of Stewart’s subversive style references; psychedelic art of the 60’s and the comic absurdity of hybrid post-modern classics like Who Framed Roger Rabbit, this large scale installation features a mix of characters, patterns and galaxies, giving the feeling that the artwork is alive. Through densely packed mirrored illustrative detail, the viewer will be able to float in space, lie in a field of flowers and even ‘fly’.

In recent years Stewart’s notoriety has increased due to her personal project titled ‘doodle-bombing’ where she draws over the covers of influential publications such as Interview, Vogue, i:D and Playboy. Part homage and part satire, this ongoing personal project has formed the basis for most of her commercial projects and endeavours, avoiding a more conventional illustrative style. Stewart’s work is bold and experimental in application and sees her breaking boundaries within the field of illustration.

I Don’t Have Time For This marks the debut of NOW Gallery Young Artist programme, which aims to work with artists who have an unusual approach and standout visual aesthetic, to create a unique vision for the gallery space. As part of the on-going regeneration of Greenwich Peninsula, this programme underpins the area’s commitment to fostering creativity to build a sense of place and community, offering a blank canvas that allows those who visit and settle a chance to imagine, create and build; an opportunity to create a new London.

Since graduating from Kingston University in 2010, Hattie has created a varied portfolio having worked with creatives such as Roman Coppola and for artists like SZA, Ariana Grande and Kylie Minogue. With a vibrant, tongue in cheek visual identity, she is a self-proclaimed ‘professional doodler’ with a unique and playful illustration style that extends itself fluidly through the worlds of advertising, art and fashion. She has worked with varied clients including but not limited to – MTV, Hunter, House of Holland, Nike, Apple Music, Marc by Marc Jacobs, MAC Cosmetics, Pepsi, and Adidas. She also recently launched her very own Doodlebomb sticker book – allowing others to decorate their lives as she does her own.

www.nowgallery.co.uk/exhibitions/3959

Location:
Weekdays 10am – 7pm
Saturday 10am – 5pm
Sunday 11am – 4pm

Times:
NOW Gallery, The Gateway Pavilions, Peninsula Square, Greenwich Peninsula, London SE10 0SQ

Price:
Free entry, book free tickets online

Dan Colen: Sweet Liberty at Newport Street Gallery until 21 January 2017

Colen’s first major London solo show spans over fifteen years and features new works, including large-scale installations.

Colen emerged onto the New York art scene in the early 2000s alongside artists such as Dash Snow and Ryan McGinley. Brilliantly witty, shocking, poignant and nihilistic, his art presents a portrait of contemporary America and is, in part, an investigation into the act of producing and looking at art.

Alongside significant early works such as Me, Jesus and the Children (2001–2003) – a photorealist painting of the artist’s chest, overlaid with cartoon cherubs and floating speech bubbles – the exhibition features paintings from Colen’s long-running ‘Gum’ and ‘Trash’ series. In the ‘Gum’ paintings, spots of brightly coloured chewing gum – usually only seen in the mouths of others or stuck to the soles of shoes – are layered onto the canvas as paint. The ‘Trash’ works incorporate rubbish and discarded ephemera, the kind you would often encounter piled up in the street. Referencing Arte Povera, Abstract Expressionism and action painting, the trash is mixed with paint and used as an unwieldy brush to form shapes based on Raphael’s exalted Madonna and Child paintings. With their irreverent borrowing from art history and disruptive combination of abstraction and figuration, they are paintings about painting, paintings about belief.

The exhibition features four installations, in which Colen continues to appropriate and subvert imagery from the globalised mass media and American subcultures. In these installations, Colen’s examinations of masculinity and individuality are brought to the fore. The bloated, spent machismo of the American Dream is laid bare to reveal a deep-seated existential unease.

www.newportstreetgallery.com/exhibition/dan-colen-sweet-liberty

Doors:
Tue - Sun 10am - 6pm

Location:
Newport Street Gallery, Newport Street, London SE11 6AJ

Price:
Free entry

Sonia Boyce: We move in her way @ ICA / until 16th Apr 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Sun 11am–11pm (Thu until 9pm)

@ Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA), The Mall, London SW1Y 5AH

£1 day membership, find out more

www.ica.art/whats-on/sonia-boyce-we-move-her-way

A new body of work created especially for the ICA. Involving the exploratory vocal and movement performances of Elaine Mitchener, Barbara Gamper and her dancers Eve Stainton, Ria Uttridge and Be van Vark, with an invited audience.

A multi-media installation has been generated from the documentation of their open-ended live performance. The title of the work suggests two possible readings: that ‘she’ dictates our movements; or that we obstruct ‘hers’, with both interpretations suggesting power is at play.

Boyce has a participatory art practice where she invites others to engage performatively with improvisation. In this process, she encourages contributors to exercise their own responses to the situations she enables, where she steps back from any directorial position to observe the activities and dynamics of exchange as they unfold. Once the performance is played out and documented, Boyce reshapes the material generated, in what she calls “recouping the remains”, to create the artwork as a multi-media installation.

We move in her way was created in this way as a performative laboratory, in which the audience and performers negotiated the ICA Theatre space around sculptural objects and their own bodies. Play and playfulness unfolded during the open-ended live performance, sparking a breakdown of assumed order between performers and audience. The dynamics of power-play shifted between the masked audience, the performers and the sculptural objects created as a means to facilitate touch and being together, whilst remaining distinct.

Protest @ Victoria Miro (Gallery 1) / until 5th November 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tuesday-Saturday 10:00am-6:00pm

@ Victoria Miro, Gallery I, 16 Wharf Road, London N1 7RW

Free entry

www.victoria-miro.com

Historical and contemporary works feature in a group exhibition by artists concerned with the socio-political issues of their day, who question the status quo and the power structures found within societies, and who take the very language of protest as a means to explore its potency.

Taking as a starting point Alice Neel’s 1936 painting Nazis Murder Jews, the exhibition presents new and recent works by artists including Doug Aitken, Elmgreen & Dragset, Isaac Julien, Wangechi Mutu, Richard Prince and Sarah Sze amongst others. These works do not document protests per se, but rather through image, composition, gesture, material, form or concept, serve as a call to action – inspiring consideration of possibilities for a life of freedom, an insistence on human rights, and continued debate and dialogue around the immediate social and political issues which confront our global community.

Artists:
Doug Aitken, Jules de Balincourt, Vlassis Caniaris, Elmgreen & Dragset, Ian Hamilton Finlay, Christian Holstad, Isaac Julien, Yayoi Kusama, Wangechi Mutu, Alice Neel, Chris Ofili, Richard Prince, Sarah Sze, Wolfgang Tillmans, Rirkrit Tiravanija and Kara Walker.

Jorge Otero-Pailos: The Ethics of Dust @ Houses of Parliament / until 1st September 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Monday to Saturday 9am to 5.30pm

@ Houses of Parliament, Westminster Hall, Westminster, London SW1A 0AA

Tickets: free, book online

www.artangel.org.uk
www.parliament.uk

Commissioned and produced by Artangel, this temporary art installation was created by artist, architect and conservationist Jorge Otero-Pailos. The artwork is a 50 metre long translucent latex cast of Westminster Hall’s east wall and contains hundreds of years of surface pollution and dust.

Suspended from the hall’s magnificent 28-metre high hammerbeam roof, the latex sheet contains innumerable particles of dust, soot and dirt gently lifted from the wall during the sensitive cleaning process.

The Big Blue @ Ordovas Gallery / until 12th December 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Tue-Fri: 10:00-18:00
Sat: 11:00-15:00

@ Ordovas Gallery, 25 Savile Row, London W1S 2ER

Free entry

www.ordovasart.com

Conceived by Damien Hirst and curated by Ordovas.

The Big Blue explores some of the ways in which the sea influences art, by looking at works that span many centuries from Roman times until today. Our intention is to offer an original and penetrating glimpse into a universal theme.

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