Tag: free exhibitions (page 1 of 5)

Eddie Peake: Concrete Pitch at White Cube Bermondsey until 8 April 2018

Featuring new sculpture, painting, sound work and performance presented in an immersive and constructed environment. 🔊 🏙

The works weave autobiographical elements and an examination of self-identity with more general themes of desire, the body, architecture and urban landscape. The title ‘Concrete Pitch’ was inspired by the bare, concrete recreation ground in Finsbury Park in London where Peake grew up, which was used as a playground, a sports field, a meeting place for people of every age, class and ethnicity and location for encounters and scenarios of all kinds. Peake has said: ‘I used to treat things I did like graffiti and football and dance classes as not part of my art, then I had a sort of epiphany. I realised I want all those parts of my life in my art, and vice versa.’ For Peake, whose work can be located within a history of painting and object-making as well as more recent narratives of dance and performance art, the gallery can also be considered a stage; a place to orchestrate dramas of the everyday and to present the rich associative portrait of his childhood neighbourhood as a microcosm of urban, multicultural society.

Peake will be present in the gallery space throughout the exhibition, following a scheduled daily routine. Moving between various constructed spaces which include a private office and a triangular cell-like structure, accessible only by a tall ladder. The artist ‘plays’ himself, both offering up and dismantling the narrative of artistic ego, fictional protagonist and ‘real’ self. In another specially constructed room, visible behind a window, DJs from Kool London broadcast an online radio show during the exhibition. Broadcasting oldskool jungle and drum and bass from East London tower blocks since 1991, Kool FM is one of the longest running underground stations and provided the soundtrack to Peake’s adolescence.

The new, large-scale sound installation, Stroud Green Road runs through the gallery, consisting of a row of steel tables placed in a snaking line, just as the street of the same name runs through Peake’s neighbourhood. On their tray-like surfaces is an array of objects: small-scale sculptures as well as an eclectic selection of items purchased from shops on Stroud Green Road and several small speakers which emit a low, deep register like a wavering vibration or rattle. Composed by the artist using distorted samples and field recordings from the local area, this abstract soundscape creates a continuously looping hum, while a soft pink light floods the exhibition space. Continuing the theme of revealing and concealing, an airy white curtain hangs full-length from the ceiling, creating a natural spiralling passageway, in the centre of which a split-screen projection shows four dancers, each locked in an individual, looping sequence of complex, choreographed movement. The notion of the loop, a key motif within Peake’s work, is manifested in these repetitive movements, in the daily rituals the artist will be observing, in the sonic structure of the sound sculpture and in the music played by the Kool DJs. For Peake, these devices echo the entrapping loops of thought or behaviour associated with compulsion, obsession and depression.

In several new series of paintings, techniques of layering and masking are used to create vivid abstract compositions on canvas or hard, reflective stainless-steel panels. In one group, overlapping, spray-painted rectangles recall the urban patchwork of fly-posters, while in others, graffiti-like mark-making recedes into a bright void. This exploration of the void, whereby elements of the composition are left blank or undone creates works that reflect back to the viewer a sense ennui, even depression. In another group of oil on canvas works, a rainbow-coloured text defines the form of a head in profile spelling out the enigmatic slogans ‘A More Uncomfortable And Realistic History’, and ‘We To The Ramp Go For Relinquish Unearned Privileges And Powers’. Suggesting the direct, angry tone of graffiti, social media and urban music, these works are an expression of ideas that have formerly been implicit in Peake’s work.


White Cube Bermondsey, 144 – 152 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ

Tuesday – Saturday 10am – 6pm
Sunday 12pm – 6pm

Free entry

Rise Art Prize at House of Vans until 25 February 2018

The most exciting contemporary artists from around the world are shown in a new public exhibition hosted by global art platform Rise Art. Perfect for art lovers and culture hounds. 👨‍🎨 👩‍🎨

Showcasing the works of 25 finalists from the inaugural Rise Art Prize, a global competition seeking to unearth new and established talent from around the world. The exhibition allows the public to experience these artists first hand, with exclusive talks and tours by top industry figures and curators.

Spanning works from UK and international contemporary artists across the globe, the exhibition is a one-stop-shop to discover the latest innovators in art, including incredible sculptures, photography, street art, paint and much more.


House of Vans, Arches, 228-232 Station Approach Road, Lambeth, London SE1 8SW

Thursday – Friday 4pm – 10pm
Saturday 10am – 8pm
Sunday 12pm – 6pm

Free entry

The Currency of Communism at British Museum until 18 March 2018

This display looks at the changing roles of currency and exchange in communist states in the century since the 1917 Russian Revolution. 🤑 🤑 🤑

Communism proposes that money has no role in a utopian society. To date though, no communist state has successfully removed money from its economy. In the last 100 years, communism has existed in various forms in dozens of states all around in the world. From eastern Europe to Southeast Asia, this display examines the role of money in communist states, as well as the iconography and imagery associated with it.

Within communist economies, concepts of value and wealth are eroded and distorted, and the national currency becomes just one of various means of exchange. The display features examples of how the value of money has been reduced by communist states. East German coins made from aluminium demonstrate how communist currency was deliberately made to feel light and cheap. Adverts for savings banks from the USSR show how consumer benefits were left out of advertising in favour of information explaining how savings benefit the state.

With the reduced role of currency, communist states introduced different reward systems, starting in Russia in the 1930s. Stalin said people were to be measured ‘by their heroic feats’. A worker who exceeded their factory quota may receive the Order of the Badge of Honour, and a mother who raised nine children would receive the Order of Maternal Glory, First Class. These awards came with monetary bonuses, and allowed recipients access to a better quality of life due to the perks that came with them.

The collapse of the Soviet Union and the transition to democracy in the early 1990s had a huge effect on former communist states. With borders and economies suddenly open after many years, new ideas and imagery soon began to circulate, along with new national currencies. Today there are only four states with planned economies – China, Laos, Cuba and Vietnam. Trading relations between them and capitalist countries have become normalised, but concepts of currency and political ideology continue to evolve.


British Museum, Great Russell Street, London WC1B 3DG

10am – 5:30pm (Friday until 8:30pm)

Free entry

The Come Up by Charles Jeffrey at NOW Gallery until 11 February 2018

Charles Jeffrey, the Glaswegian designer, illustrator and creative, is NOW Gallery’s third fashion commission. Charles’ first solo exhibition, THE COME UP will be an interactive and three-dimensional representation of the Charles Jeffrey LOVERBOY brand and cult club night.

Based around Charles’ renowned illustrations, THE COME UP will explore these artworks amplified via new media. Showcased in a three-dimensional format, the exhibition will act as a manifestation of Charles’ mind. Charles’ emotive and vibrant illustrations will be interpreted afresh through large sculptural pieces that will hang from the gallery’s seven-meter ceiling. The sculptures will be a mix of PVC, fibreglass, chicken wire with papier-mache, and electrical tape, varying greatly in size.

As part of the installation, a series of shelves filled with mixed media artistic materials will be the setting of an interactive experience that will invite visitors to open up their alter egos and let creativity take over. Starting with a representation from Charles himself, the installation provides an opportunity for the visiting community to progress the structural artwork until it is complete. This relates back to a signature part of Charles’ illustrative work – repeated faces – as at the end, the installation will become a physical representation and exploration of the realm of identities and many faces who have been welcomed into the gallery to interact with THE COME UP, much like those who attend a LOVERBOY club night.


NOW Gallery, The Gateway Pavilions, Peninsula Square, Greenwich Peninsula, London SE10 0SQ

Mon – Fri 10am – 7pm
Sat – Sun 11am – 4pm

Free entry

Christmas Past at Geffrye until 7 January 2018

Escape from the hustle and bustle of Christmas and step back through time to Christmas Past. See authentic festive decorations, lighting, music and greenery transform the museum’s period living rooms, giving an evocative glimpse into how Christmas has been celebrated in English homes over the past 400 years. 🎄 🏠 🎅

Seasonal food and drink will be on the menu in the café and the shop will be full of Christmas decorations and cards, stylish home-wares, gifts and treats.


136 Kingsland Road, London E2 8EA

Tuesday – Sunday 10am – 5pm
Monday closed (Bank Holiday Mondays 10am – 5pm)

Free entry

Walk Through British Art at British Museum

Walk through time and explore artworks from 1545 to the present day.

A chronological display of Britain’s greatest artists, taken from the collection. Instead of designated themes or movements, the display is is arranged by decade, so you can see an array of art made at any one moment.


Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1P 4RG

Mon-Sun 10am-6pm

Free entry

Chroma at House of Vans from 29 November until 17 December 2017

In collaboration with award winning design and creative collective Studio PSK will be transforming the Tunnel One gallery space into an immersive light and play installation. 🔸🔻🔹▫️▪️

The entire exhibition – from the specially commissioned artworks, to the objects within it – use the same shade of red, green and blue. Lighting in the space is controlled by a bespoke musical score; when flooded with the changing red, green and blue light, an analogue ‘stop frame animation’ effect is created – making static images appear to move.


The Arches, 228-232 Station Approach Road, Lambeth, London SE1 8SW

Thu – Fri 4pm – 10pm
Sat 10am – 8pm
Sun 12pm – 6pm

Free entry

John Akomfrah Purple at Barbican Curve until 7 January 2018

British artist and filmmaker, John Akomfrah creates his most ambitious piece to date – an immersive six-channel video installation addressing climate change, human communities and the wilderness. 📹 📺

At a time when, according to the UN, greenhouse gas emissions from human activities are at their highest levels in history, with people experiencing the significant impacts of climate change, including shifting weather patterns, rising sea level, and more extreme weather events, Akomfrah’s Purple brings a multitude of ideas into conversation. These include animal extinctions, the memory of ice, the plastic ocean and global warming. Akomfrah has combined hundreds of hours of archival footage with newly shot film and a hypnotic sound score to produce the video installation.


Sat – Wed 11am – 8pm
Thu and Fri 11am – 9pm

Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS


New Artist Fair ‘Summer Exhibition’ @ Old Truman Brewery / until Sunday 10th September 2017


Saturday 12am-6pm
Sunday 12am-6pm

@ Old Truman Brewery, Off Ely’s Yard, London E1 6QR

Free entry, book online


The event is showcasing over 100 new emerging and recently established contemporary artists from the UK and around the world. If you are looking to fall in love with some contemporary art of the highest quality at truly affordable prices, then the New Artist Fair’s ‘Summer Exhibition’ is the art event for you!

The exhibition will be showcasing over 100 unique contemporary UK and International artists, who will all be available to discuss their work with visitors throughout the duration of the event.

The ‘Summer Exhibition’ is different from most other art fairs because it has the feel and look of a gallery layout within the chosen spacious venue along with a very friendly and welcoming vibe. As always there will be examples of all genres and styles of artwork on display and for sale at very affordable prices.

There will even be some live art throughout the weekend, so our visitors can watch the exciting process of art being created. Artwork can be purchased and taken home on the day from the fair or shipping can be arranged through the artists. Also many artists work with buyers to make the perfect individual piece for a certain room or person and commissions like this can also be arranged directly with the artist.

New to the exhibition this year is the New Photography Zone which will be showcasing a variety of photographic artists along with the winners of this year’s PhotoX competition.

There will be 20 re-exhibiting artists and 90 who are completely new to showing, all have been carefully selected to represent their particular genre. Whatever your style or preference, the New Artist Fair promises to have something for everyone.

Ashley Bickerton: Ornamental Hysteria @ Newport Street Gallery / until 20th August 2017


Tuesday – Sunday 10am – 6pm
Closed on Mondays

@ Newport Street Gallery, Newport Street, London SE11 6AJ

Free entry


Spanning more than three decades of Bickerton’s career and features 51 works, including a significant display of new and previously unexhibited pieces. It is the artist’s first UK show since 2009 and runs throughout all six spaces at Newport Street Gallery.

Bickerton moved to New York in 1982 and after working as a painting assistant to Jack Goldstein, he emerged as a key figure on the newly exploding East Village art scene. Within the context of the culture of commodification sweeping America he rose to prominence as part of an amorphous movement that was branded ‘Neo-Geometric Conceptualism’. Alongside artists such as Haim Steinbach and Jeff Koons, Bickerton endeavoured to reframe the practice of art production in response to the new, seductive mechanisms of desire at work in society.

Bickerton abandoned New York in 1993, eventually settling in Bali, where he still lives and works. Whilst a number of his themes prevailed, the materiality of his work shifted dramatically after this self-imposed exile from the urban environment.

Both in materiality and content, Bickerton’s work resists categorisation. On the diversity of his mediums – photocollage, appropriated image, digital image, paint and sculpture – he states: “Painting is far too cartoony and lacks the backbone of factuality; photography is too clinical and incapable of loony launches into the ether; and sculpture can be just downright presumptuous. […] Only in their combination do I find comfort.”

Bickerton’s conceptual commitment to intersectionality extends to his subject matter; his audacious and technically complex assemblages are predicated on themes of opposition and duality, for example representation and reality, creativity and commodity, nature and artifice, idyll and apocalypse. This is evident in his earlier work on display in gallery 1, which offers a sardonic critique of contemporary consumer culture and the commodification of the ‘art object’ via steel and aluminium wall-mounted ‘Culturescapes’ from the ‘Logo’ and ‘Non-Word Word’ series. Galleries 3 and 4 are dominated by Bickerton’s ‘Sea’ and ‘Landscapes’ – overblown and incongruous, they contain ephemera from the anthroposphere in the simulated shells of transportation devices. In part, these “truly contemporary” landscapes might be read as a dystopian view of the devastating impact of man on the ecosphere.

Throughout his career, Bickerton has challenged the relevancy of traditional art-historical tropes. His ‘self-portraits’ similarly parody the mythological figure of ‘the artist’, who is represented in the guise of the brands he chooses to endorse in Tormented Self-Portrait: Susie at Arles (25 Years) (2014) and as a five-bodied, technicoloured serpent in the monumental 5 Snake Heads (2009), on display in Newport Street’s double-height gallery 2.

Bickerton’s practice evolved in the late 90s to incorporate digital image and photography. In portraits such as Smiling Woman (2009), models (often family members and friends) are heavily made-up and photographed, then distorted in Photoshop before the image is printed on canvas and re-painted. These paintings are amongst Bickerton’s most overtly satirical, presenting lurid, constructed visions of life on a generic Pacific / Caribbean island.

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