Tag: galleries in london

Fred Wilson: Afro Kismet at Pace Gallery until 27 April 2018

An exhibition featuring the artist’s most recent body of work originally produced for the 15th Istanbul Biennial in the autumn of 2017. The exhibition will be Wilson’s first at Pace London. On the occasion of Afro Kismet, Pace will publish a catalogue that will include an introduction by artist duo and Istanbul Biennial curators Elmgreen & Dragset, an essay by the Biennial’s Director Bige Örer, and an interview with the artist conducted by American novelist, playwright and essayist Darryl Pinckney. 👀

The genesis of the exhibition stretches back to 1992 when Wilson presented Re:Claiming Egypt, at the 4th International Cairo Biennale and to 2003 when Wilson represented the United States at the 50th Venice Biennale with Speak of Me as I Am. Wilson’s interest in Istanbul had been piqued for a long time; he conceived of the city as the third leg in a historically and culturally connected eastern Mediterranean triangle which also included Cairo and Venice. Through his research, Wilson developed a conceptual basis for the Istanbul project in which he contextualized pieces from the city’s Pera Museum’s Orientalist collection with new and existing works of his own. “My work is about an issue which is both personal and universal. […] A new meaning emerges from the coming together of art and history […] bring[ing] a fresh perspective to things we are used to seeing in museums. You can say that I tell a history which is not adequately discussed…” Fred Wilson, 2017.

For Pace, Wilson will reconfigure Afro Kismet which includes two chandeliers, two monumental Iznik tile walls, four black glass drip works, and a globe sculpture, as well as installations and vitrine pieces that gather cowrie shells, engravings, photographs, a Yoruba mask, and furniture, among other objects that the artist discovered in his frequent trips to Istanbul throughout 2016 and 2017. Since Venice Biennale in 2003, Wilson’s Murano glass chandeliers, with their shifts in scale, color, and complexity, have become vehicles for the artist’s meditations on blackness, death, and beauty. New chandeliers, included in the exhibition, combine black Murano glass with traditional metal and glass elements of Ottoman chandeliers, thus fusing two histories of craftsmanship and symbolizing the complex relationship between the Venetian and Ottoman Empires.

Throughout the exhibition, Wilson utilizes alluring materials—from richly coloured tiles walls to luminescent glass—to represent and investigate the long-ignored presence of communities of African descent in Turkey. In the two Iznik tile walls, the Arabic calligraphy translates in one case to “Mother Africa” and in the other “Black is Beautiful”. The new globe sculpture titled “Trade Winds” refers not to its original meaning, related to weather patterns, but to the complex and tragic global trade in human beings. The juxtaposition of recent works by Wilson with works from the 19th century – including Orientalist paintings with African subject matter by Alfred De Dreux and William James Müller – not only questions notions of universal knowledge and truth, but also sheds light on a history not thoroughly examined. By combining contemporary objects and museum-quality artefacts, Wilson challenges the assumptions of exhibition methodology and art historical scholarship.

www.pacegallery.com/exhibitions/12917/afro-kismet

Location:
Pace Gallery, 6 Burlington Gardens, London W1S 3ET

Times:
Tuesday – Saturday 10am – 6pm

Entry:
Free

Rachel Howard: Repetition is Truth – Via Dolorosa at Newport Street Gallery until 28 May 2018

Religion, repetition, mortality and violence – particularly controlled violence – are enduring themes in Howard’s work. These fourteen, large-scale paintings are accompanied by a small 2005 study of Ali Shallal al-Qaisi, the Iraqi detainee who was photographed being subjected to torture at the hands of American soldiers in Abu Ghraib prison in 2003. When these now-infamous images of Ali Shallal al-Qaisi – hooded and standing on a box in a cruciform position – were released in 2004, Howard took particular note of the box. She explains: ‘The box is almost like a plinth – I was thinking about the cross, the Crucifixion, and how it related to this box as a twenty-first century place of horror, humiliation and human rights atrocities, and I couldn’t help but connect the two.’ As one moves between the Stations, the box variously emerges, or appears almost submerged in the paint, before eventually vanishing. 🖼

In order to create these semi-abstract paintings the artist applied vast swathes of household gloss paint to the canvas. Howard allowed the pigment and varnish to separate in the paint can and then allowed gravity to influence the direction of the medium in its two forms, building layer upon layer of poured paint. The form of each painting was thus determined by a combination of the weight and viscosity of the paint, precision and chance.

www.newportstreetgallery.com/exhibition/rachel-howard-repetition-truth-via-dolorosa

Doors:
Tue - Sun 10am - 6pm

Location:
Newport Street Gallery, Newport Street, London SE11 6AJ

Price:
Free entry

Dreamers Awake @ White Cube Bermondsey / 17th September 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Tuesday-Saturday 10am-6pm
Sunday 12pm-6pm

@ White Cube Bermondsey, 144 – 152 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ

Free entry

www.whitecube.com

A group show at White Cube Bermondsey which explores the enduring influence of Surrealism through the work of more than fifty women artists. The exhibition brings together sculpture, painting, collage, photography and drawing from the 1930s to the present day and includes work by well-known Surrealist figures as well as contemporary and emerging artists. 🚺

Woman has a powerful presence in Surrealism. She is the object of masculine desire and fantasy; a harpy, goddess or sphinx; a mystery or threat. Often, she appears decapitated, distorted, trussed up. Fearsome or fetishized, she is always the ‘other’. From today’s perspective, gender politics can seem the unlikely blind spot of a movement that declared war on patriarchal society, convention and conformity.

Nonetheless, from its earliest days female artists have been drawn to Surrealism’s emphasis on personal and artistic freedoms and to the creative potential that the exploration of the unconscious offered. By focusing on the work of women artists, ‘Dreamers Awake’ hopes to show how, through art foregrounding bodily experience, the symbolic woman of Surrealism is refigured as a creative, sentient, thinking being.

Repossessed by its owner, the fragmented, headless body of Surrealism becomes a vehicle for irony, resistance, humour and self-expression. Ranging beyond those who might identify themselves as Surrealists, the show traces the influence of the movement where artists delve into the unconscious; create alternative realities; invent fetishistic objects, such as Mona Hatoum’s Jardin Public (1993), that subvert the objectification of the female form, or, in the spirit of Claude Cahun’s iconic black and white self-portraits from the 1930s, play with gender identity as a fluid construct.

The exhibition features works by women associated with the Surrealist movement – including Eileen Agar, Leonora Carrington, Lee Miller, Dorothea Tanning and Leonor Fini – who until recently, were often characterised simply as muses, models or mistresses. Works by Francesca Woodman, Hannah Wilke, Louise Bourgeois, Rosemarie Trockel, Kiki Smith, Paloma Varga Weisz, Mona Hatoum, Tracey Emin and Sarah Lucas, among others, testify to the far-reaching influence of Surrealism through the intervening decades. Surrealism meets punk in the work of Linder, and infuses the separate cultural heritages of Iraqi artist Hayv Kahraman and Japanese painter Tomoko Kashiki.

Today, one hundred years since Apollinaire coined the term ‘surrealisme’, the unconscious mind is familiar territory, and the word ‘surreal’ itself debased to the point of meaninglessness. But in a world preoccupied with the politics of identity, in which the advances of previous generations must be continually defended, we see the continued – even renewed – relevance of surrealist ideas and strategies to a generation of emerging artists, including Sascha Braunig, Jordan Kasey, Loie Hollowell, Kelly Akashi, and Caitlin Keogh.

Postponed Futures @ Gallery for Russian Arts and Design / until 24 June 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Fri 11am-7pm (Sat 5pm)

@ GRAD (Gallery for Russian Arts and Design), 3-4A Little Portland Street, London W1W 7JB

Free entry

www.grad-london.com

An exhibition that offers an alternative perspective on early twentieth century Ukrainian avantgarde practices through the lens of contemporary Ukrainian art.

Curated by Kiev-based artist Nikita Kadan, the exhibition includes historical works by twentieth century masters Oleksandr Bohomazov, Vasyl Ermilov, Maria Synyakova and Oleksandr Khvostenko-Khvostov, alongside collages by Lada Nakonechna, a film by Mykola Ridnyi and a sculpture by Nikita Kadan, inspired by ‘Monument to three Revolutions’ by Vasyl Ermilov.

Natural Light – Blue Light Room by Bruce Nauman @ Blain|Southern / until 12th November 2016 ?

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Mon-Fri 10am-6pm
Sat 10am-5pm

@ Blain|Southern, 4 Hanover Square London W1S 1BP

Free entry

www.blainsouthern.com

A significant architectural installation exhibited for the first time since its initial presentation in 1971. It is one of the earliest instances of the artist producing built environments to intentionally discomfit or disorientate the viewer.

In the gallery, there were some skylights above one wall. I installed blue fluorescent lights below the sky lights. It messed up your ability to see the space clearly because when you got under them you started getting a lot of afterimages. Everything became a little jumpy… There was nothing else in the space. So the idea was that it would be hard to know what to focus on and even if you did, it would be hard to focus.’ – Bruce Nauman

While in many ways representative of the minimalist aesthetic of the late 1960s and early 1970s, Natural Light, Blue Light Room also reveals a specific set of ideas that concerned Nauman at the time. He devised Natural Light, Blue Light Room at a time when artists were attempting to reduce to the barest minimum what was necessary for an action, object or intervention to be declared an artwork. He had already started to explore how to change the emphasis from the production of an inert art object to an installation that would create a particular physical or psychological experience for the viewer. In order to fulfil this aim, he set aside the convention of representing light, temperature or space in a sculpture or image, and instead used these phenomena as the actual raw material or media of his work.

Walking into the gallery, viewers experience a physical response to the empty space and unfamiliar light. With time, they discern two different light sources – the natural daylight and blue fluorescent lights. This initial physical stimulus grows more confusing as the atmosphere in the room changes and resets itself with the shifting light outside. Meanwhile, the blue light remains wholly consistent, becoming a strangely tangible presence in the room, thus acting like an image or symbol, almost an object in itself, inviting the viewer to interpret their own reaction to the disorientating experience of the room.

*This art installation is best experienced during daylight hours

Los Carpinteros @ Parasol Unit / until 24th May 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Monday: by prior arrangement
Tue–Sat 10am–6pm
Sun 12–5 pm

@ Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art, 14 Wharf Road, London N1 7RW

Free entry

www.parasol-unit.org

Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art is presenting an exhibition of works by Cuban art collective, Los Carpinteros (Marco Castillo and Dagoberto Rodríguez).

This exhibition, the duo’s first major show in a public London institution, includes extensive installations, sculptures, watercolour drawings and a film screening, which aim to explore and interrogate the functionality of architecture, design and the everyday object.

The deftly crafted -and often humorous- installations and sculptures made by Los Carpinteros may appear whimsical at first, yet every piece has an element of political commentary, mostly related to their personal experience and context. This dichotomy provides a vast resource with which they can be both playful and critical. Often described as ‘interrogative art’, their work examines the relationship between art and society, form and function, practicality and frivolousness.

Los CarpinterosInstallation viewParasol unit foundation for contemporary art2015Photo: Jack HemsCourtesy of Parasol unit

Posted by Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art on Saturday, 11 April 2015

Marlene Dumas: The Image as Burden @ Tate Modern / until 10th May 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Sun – Thu, 10am – 6pm
Fri – Sat, 10am – 10pm

@ Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: £14:50 book online

Marlene Dumas is one of the most prominent painters working today. Her intense, psychologically charged works explore themes of sexuality, love, death and shame, often referencing art history, popular culture and current affairs – themes you can explore through related events.

‘Secondhand images’, she has said, ‘can generate first-hand emotions.’ Dumas never paints directly from life, yet life in all its complexity is right there on the canvas. Her subjects are drawn from both public and personal references and include her daughter and herself, as well as recognisable faces such as Amy Winehouse, Naomi Campbell, Princess Diana, even Osama bin Laden. The results are often intimate and at times controversial, where politics become erotic and portraits become political. She plays with the imagination of her viewers, their preconceptions and fears.

 

Richard Serra @ Gagosian Gallery / extended until Wednesday 4th March 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue–Sat 10-6

@ Gagosian Gallery, 6-24 Britannia Street, London WC1X 9JD

Free entry

www.gagosian.com

Richard Serra was born in San Francisco in 1938. He studied at the University of California (Berkeley and Santa Barbara) and at Yale University. He has lived in New York since 1966. His first solo exhibitions were held at Galleria La Salita, Rome (1966), and at the Leo Castelli Warehouse, New York (1969). His first solo museum exhibition was presented at Pasadena Art Museum (1970). Serra has since participated in several Documenta exhibitions (Kassel, 1972, 1977, 1982, and 1987), and in the Venice Biennales of 1980, 1984, 2001, and 2013. Serra’s work has been shown in numerous solo museum exhibitions at Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1977); Centre Pompidou, Paris (1984); Museum of Modern Art, New York (1986 and 2007); and other museums in Europe, the U.S., and Latin America. In 2005, eight large-scale works were permanently installed at Guggenheim Museum Bilbao. A traveling survey of Serra’s drawings was on view in 2011–12 at Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; and Menil Collection, Houston. In April 2014, Serra installed a major permanent landscape sculpture in the desert of the Brouq Nature Reserve in western Qatar.

Overload: Exhibition @ Graffik Gallery / Friday 25th July – 7th August 2014

139TIME AND PLACE:

11:00 – 18.30 Everyday

@ Graffik Gallery
284 Portobello Road,
London,
W10 5TE

Entry: £FREE

www.graffikgallery.com

Graffik Gallery is proud to be hosting the first UK Solo Show for Jade Doreen Waller entitled “Overload”.

Jade Doreen Waller, an innovative young artist from Cape Town, is creating a stir in the interdisciplinary visual art industry with her unique approach to Urban Contemporary art. Having presented the highly successful solo exhibition Between Ourselves in Cape Town two years ago, Waller is ready to deliver her second show, Overload. For Overload the artist created an entire new body of work that shows off her creativity and skill. Waller’s concepts are deeply rooted in Urban Contemporary subculture, evident in the multiple layers of images in her work.

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