Tag: gallery (page 1 of 12)

Charles Richardson: HEADBONE @ Zabludowicz Collection / until 8th November 2015


Doors: Thursday–Sunday 12–6pm

@ Zabludowicz Collection, 176 Prince of Wales Road, London NW5 3PT

Free entry


Exploring themes of male identity and uncertainty. Through the symbolic use of bodies, objects and gestures he navigates the idiosyncrasies that permeate the ‘lifestyles’ of today. Employing images of the absurd Richardson’s approach disarms through dark humour and the staging of infantile wonder.

The exhibition HEADBONE features a new single-channel video has as its central component, extending both the technical ambition and emotional complexity of his practice. Using digital photography Richardson creates 3D models of his own body, and the bodies of others, which are then animated with movement and sound. Bound in everyday detritus the figures appear frozen and mute, yet full of psychological resonance. The video is presented alongside sculptural objects linked to its production, and displayed in an installation constructed from foil-covered board that requires viewers to weave a route through to a final ‘chamber’.

Ryan Gander: Fieldwork @ Lisson Gallery / until 31st October 2015


Monday-Friday 10:00am-6:00pm
Saturday 11:00am-5:00pm

@ Lisson Gallery, 27 & 52 Bell Street, London NW1 5BU

Free entry


Ryan Gander returns for a third time to Lisson Gallery with Fieldwork, an exhibition of interlinking new works by the artist, each offering a glimpse of the inspirations that feed his practice.

Encompassing everything including a kitchen sink, the exhibition presents an individuated encyclopaedia that includes a year’s worth of skies, the clothes of absentee statues, a tent, a helium balloon, the artist’s phone number and a pebble beach. As ever with Gander’s art, the forms convened in Fieldwork are elliptic and opaque, starting stories for the viewer to invent or complete.

Occupying the entire back gallery, the titular work Fieldwork 2015 opens a window onto the revolving touchstones of Gander’s art. Objects from the artist’s collection – each seemingly found but on closer inspection uniquely crafted (for instance, a National Trust sign protecting ‘Culturefield’, Gander’s imaginary artistic utopia) – rotate round the room on a vast, walled-off conveyer belt. Views of these items gliding past momentarily (a baseball bat covered in nails, a pair of dead pigeons, a chocolate bar swoosh…) are granted via an aperture in the gallery’s wall, creating a memory game of strange associations and a prism of connections (a chess set, a tortured teddy bear, a dead chick served on a plate with a napkin signed by Picasso…) through which to consider the rest of the exhibition.

A Utopian Stage: Festival of Arts Shiraz-Persepolis @ Whitechapel Gallery / until 4th Oct 2015


Monday closed
Tuesday 11am–6pm
Wednesday 11am–6pm
Thursday 11am–9pm
Friday 11am–6pm
Saturday 11am–6pm
Sunday 11am–6pm

Free entry


The ancient Persian ruins of Persepolis were a spectacular backdrop for ‘one of the most adventurous and idiosyncratic festivals in the world’ (Artforum). The Festival of Arts was held around Shiraz, Iran every summer from 1967–1977.

A melting pot of traditional and avant-garde music, theatre and performance, the festival featured artists from both East and West, including the Beatles’ muse, sitar player Ravi Shankar and American composer John Cage, alongside Rwandan drummers and Balinese Gamelan musicians and dancers. Orghast,
a play by poet Ted Hughes and Mahin Tajadod, co-directed by Peter Brook, was staged, while Merce Cunningham’s dancers performed calisthenics among the ruins of Persepolis.

The festival came to an end with the Iranian revolution, but is now brought to life through this display of archive film and photographs, original theatre programmes and posters seen for the first time in the UK.

Nicholas Mangan: Ancient Lights @ Chisenhale / until 30th August 2015


Doors: Wed-Sun 1pm–6pm

@ Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Road, London E3 5QZ

Free entry


Major new film installation by Melbourne-based artist Nicholas Mangan that continues his recent investigations into the relationship between energy and social transformation.

Ancient Lights is the first solo exhibition of Mangan’s work in the UK and comprises two new films, presented within a specially conceived installation powered entirely by an on-site solar PV system. This new work is the culmination of Mangan’s extended research into the physical and conceptual power of the sun, and the role that it has played in human economy, culture and technology throughout history.


Fighting History @ Tate Britain / until 13th September 2015


Doors: 10.00–18.00 daily

Tickets: £12 book online

@ Tate Britain, Millbank London SW1P 4RG


From Ancient Rome to recent political upheavals, Fighting History looks at how artists have transformed significant events into paintings and artworks that encourage us to reflect on our own place in history.

From the epic 18th century history paintings by John Singleton Copley and Benjamin West to 20th century and contemporary pieces by Richard Hamilton and Dexter Dalwood, the exhibition explores how artists have reacted to key historic events, and how they capture and interpret the past.

Often vast in scale, history paintings engage with important narratives from the past, from scripture and from current affairs. Some scenes protest against state oppression, while others move the viewer with heroic acts, tragic deaths and the plights of individuals swept up in events beyond their control. The Death of Amy Robsart by William Frederick Yeames, which has been newly conserved for this exhibition, casts a spotlight on a historical mystery while John Minton’s The Death of Nelson offers a tender perspective on the death of one of England’s greatest naval commanders.

The exhibition also shows how contemporary artists, such as Turner Prize winner Jeremy Deller, continue to engage with the traditions of history painting to confront modern-day tragedies and dilemmas.

Coral Reefs: Secret Cities of the Sea @ Natural History Museum / until 13th September 2015


Doors: 10am–5.50pm

Tickets: £10 book online

@ Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD


Our oceans are changing and coral reefs tell us how. Coral reefs are home to almost a quarter of all marine species. In this new exhibition you will meet the inhabitants of these richly diverse habitats, and find out why reefs are so important and how their future is being secured.

Encounter 250 strange and beautiful specimens from our collections including the gigantic Turbinaria coral, the venomous blue-ringed octopus and coral collected by Charles Darwin.

Take a virtual reef dive, see live sea coral and fish in our aquarium and enjoy spectacular underwater photography.

The London Illustration Fair @ Hoxton Arches / from Friday 10th July until Sunday 12th July 2015


Friday 2pm–10pm
Saturday 12–8pm
Sunday 12–6pm

@ Hoxton Arches, Arch 402, London E2 8HD

Tickets: £5 general admission (students get 50% off Friday launch party tickets with promotional code ‘cosmic’)


Back with their fourth event Summer Festival: Psychedelia. A psychedelic inspired cosmic universe, showcasing mind altering artworks from creative agencies, collectives, publications, textile designers, visual artists and print studios from around the UK.

Line-up and activities:
14 exhibitor stands, including Material Gallery, Belly Kids, Pirrip Press, Brothers of the Stripe, Ben Oakley Gallery, East London Printmakers, Not Another Bill, The Flood Gallery and many more.

A featured wall, exhibiting exclusive prints from a selection of handpicked artists. Keep you eyes peeled for the likes of Steve Thomas, Paul Blow, Saskia Pomeroy, Supermundane and Pâté. But hurry, each print is in an edition of 20 so once it’s sold, it’s gone for good!

‘Print your own Magic Mushroom’ screen printing workshop with Hello Print Studio, silent Wes Wilson auction, The London Illustration Fair print shop, street food vendors, live music, DJs and a fully stocked summer bar.

Signage tomfoolery! @hoxton_arches

A photo posted by The London Illustration Fair (@thelondonillustrationfair) on

Nick Waplington/Alexander McQueen: Working Process @ Tate Britain / until 17th May 2015


Doors: 10am – 6pm

@ Tate Britain, Millbank London SW1P 4RG

Tickets: £16 book online


This major exhibition presents the result of a unique collaboration between artist Nick Waplington (b. 1965) and the acclaimed fashion designer Alexander McQueen (1969–2010).

Providing a rare behind-the-scenes look into one of fashion’s most innovative and celebrated names, Waplington’s photographs capture the creative journey of McQueen’s final Autumn/Winter collection, Horn of Plenty in 2009. The critically acclaimed collection was an iconoclastic retrospective of McQueen’s career in fashion, reusing silhouettes and fabrics from his earlier collections, and creating a catwalk set out of discarded elements from the sets of his past shows.

Waplington’s photographs reveal a raw and unpolished side of the fashion world. Candid images of McQueen’s working process are juxtaposed with rigorously produced photographs of recycling plants and landfills to create a powerful commentary on destruction and creative renewal – themes at the heart of the Horn of Plenty collection.

Mac Conner: A New York Life @ House of Illustration / until 28th June 2015


Doors: Tues-Sun, 10am-6pm

@ House of Illustration, 2 Granary Square, King’s Cross, London N1C 4BH

Tickets: £7 book online


Featuring over 70 original works by McCauley ‘Mac’ Conner, one of the defining illustrators of America’s golden age of advertising.

This is the first time the work of one of New York’s original ‘Mad Men’ has been the subject of a major exhibition in the UK.

In the 1940s – 1960s, Conner’s captivating advertising and editorial illustrations graced the pages of major magazines and helped shape the image of postwar America. One of the influential group of commercial artists at the heart of Manhattan’s thriving advertising and publishing scene, Conner’s hand-painted illustrations capture the style and spirit of a pivotal era in American history.

Mac Conner: A New York Life will present Conner’s published work alongside reference photos and preliminary designs, a selection of fiction stories accompanied by illustrations from Conner and his contemporaries, advertising tearsheets for major clients such as Ford, United Airlines and AT&T, correspondence letters with editors and art directors and more – presenting a window on the dynamic world of the illustrators who created the look of a generation.

Anita Witek @ L’etangere gallery / until 2nd May 2015


Doors: Wed-Sat 11am-6pm

@ L’etangere gallery, 44a Charlotte Road, London, EC2A 3PD

Free entry


First UK solo exhibition of the celebrated Austrian artist, Anita Witek. The show, which encompasses installation, montage and photography is concerned with the production and representation of images within the field of photography, and will be displayed in a series of constructed spaces within the gallery.

From sculptural installation to photomontage, Witek renders multiple slippages between two and three dimensionality. It is this process of simultaneously ‘making’ and ‘breaking’ space, of moving within and beyond the pictorial plane and also the inside/outside spaces of the gallery itself, that reveals the innately artificial and mimetic nature of the photographic medium.

Central to Witek’s practice is the artistic process of photomontage. Her extensive archive of printed matter, consisting of contemporary and historical magazines, newspapers, found books, and posters, provide the material for her working process. By dissecting, detaching and cutting into these materials Witek not only interferes with the tension of their surfaces, but also questions and destabilises their initial content.

Witek has recently continued this de-contextualisation of the imagery with which we are consistently bombarded through the use of the material on which billboard advertisements are printed. These large-scale, consumer-driven bulletins are recycled and reformed into the artist’s colour palette; the original image becomes lost within the sculptural installation that the viewer is left with. Witek’s process comments on contemporary modes of image- making and the potentially endless chains of derivatives to which one single photograph is subject to. No longer is the index embedded within the signifying photograph, but instead it becomes just one step in a continuous flux of material; its context and history is constantly subject to re-appropriation.

Although Witek’s images may be anti-narrative in the traditional sense, being devoid of any visual connections between speaking subjects, this rupture allows for the temporal perception of the spectator to be brought forward. As the gaze moves over the image, deducing and carving a pathway through its many layers, Witek releases what avant-garde filmmaker, Malcolm Le Grice, calls ‘spectator time’: vision as function.

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