Tag: gallery (page 1 of 13)

ABC Photography @ V&A Museum of Childhood / until 4th June 2017 ?

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10:00-17:45

@ V&A Museum of Childhood, Cambridge Heath Road, London E2 9PA

Free entry

www.vam.ac.uk/moc/exhibitions/abc-photography

The alphabet is reinvented in this display of critically acclaimed photographers exploring new notions of the age-old teaching tool for children – the alphabet book.

I is for… Imagine

N is for… Now

W is for… Who, What, Where, Why?

The display brings together a collection of international photography heroes and acclaimed photographers from various walks of life. Among the 26 artists are Martin Parr, Nan Goldin, Wolfgang Tillmans, Alec Soth, Peter Lindbergh and Sebastiao Salgado.

Sonia Boyce: We move in her way @ ICA / until 16th April 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 11am–6pm (Thursday 9pm)

@ Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA), The Mall, London SW1Y 5AH

Tickets: free with £1 day entrance, book online

www.ica.org.uk/whats-on/sonia-boyce-we-move-her-way

Exhibition involving the exploratory vocal and movement performances of Elaine Mitchener, Barbara Gamper and her dancers Eve Stainton, Ria Uttridge and Be van Vark, with an invited audience. A multi-media installation has been generated from the documentation of their open-ended live performance. The title of the work suggests two possible readings: that ‘she’ dictates our movements; or that we obstruct ‘hers’, with both interpretations suggesting power is at play.

Boyce has a participatory art practice where she invites others to engage performatively with improvisation. In this process, she encourages contributors to exercise their own responses to the situations she enables, where she steps back from any directorial position to observe the activities and dynamics of exchange as they unfold. Once the performance is played out and documented, Boyce reshapes the material generated, in what she calls “recouping the remains”, to create the artwork as a multi-media installation.

We move in her way was created in this way as a performative laboratory, in which the audience and performers negotiated the ICA Theatre space around sculptural objects and their own bodies. Play and playfulness unfolded during the open-ended live performance, sparking a breakdown of assumed order between performers and audience. The dynamics of power-play shifted between the masked audience, the performers and the sculptural objects created as a means to facilitate touch and being together, whilst remaining distinct.

Notions of difference and relatedness make reference to the enduring influence of Dada within We move in her. Processes of collaborative improvisation are exemplified in the piece, referencing the Brazilian artist Lygia Clark in the late 1960s and 70s. Some of the masks worn by the audience are a re-working of Sophie Tauber’s Dada Head (1920) – itself an appropriation of Oceanic sculpture. The final artwork takes another playful turn to create a multi-layered and multi-media installation.

Bojan Šarčević invagination @ Modern Art / until 14th January 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Sat 11am-6pm

@ Modern Art, 4-8 Helmet Row, London EC1V 3QJ

Free entry

www.modernart.net

Third solo exhibition with Modern Art. Šarčević’s work was the subject of survey exhibitions at Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein, Vaduz, Liechtenstein, and Institut d’Art Contemporain, Villeurbanne, France (2012).

Bojan Šarčević was born in Belgrade in 1974. He studied at L’Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris, France, graduating in 1997, and undertook postgraduate study at Rijksakademie, Amsterdam, Netherlands, from 1999 to 2000. He lives and works in Berlin and Paris.

Mary Heilmann: Looking at Pictures @ Whitechapel Gallery / 21st August 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Sun 11am-6pm

@ Whitechapel Gallery, Galleries 1, 8 & 9, 77-82 Whitechapel High Street, London E1 7QX

Free entry

www.whitechapelgallery.org/exhibitions/mary-heilmann-looking-at-pictures

The surreal beach life of Los Angeles, 1960s counter culture, pop songs and friendships with New York artists, poets and musicians are the well springs of Mary Heilmann’s dazzling abstractions.

Heilmann (b. 1940) takes colour, line and shape on unexpected journeys. Polka dots waft across eye-popping hues corralled within irregular rectangles. The poetry of her works lies in the tension between the rigours of geometry and the contingencies of the human and the organic.

The exhibition begins with paintings based on the square, the grid and architectural details, such as The First Vent (1972). They are juxtaposed with glazed ceramics, hovering between painting and sculpture. A slide show, Her Life (2006), features Heilmann’s paintings and personal photographs set to an eclectic mix of music.

Choreographed across Gallery 8, dynamic canvases represent ‘autobiographical markers’ – painterly haikus of the artist’s life. Their vibrancy is matched by their titles – Bush of Ghosts (1980) or Good Vibrations Diptych, Remembering David (2012). Heilmann invites the viewer to become immersed in her synaesthetic stories while sitting in her colourful chairs.

White Black Gold: Keith Coventry @ PACE London / until 28th May 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10-6 Tuesday-Saturday

@ PACE London, 6 Burlington Gardens, London W1S 3ET

Free entry

www.pacegallery.com/artists/87/keith-coventry

Multi-decade exploration of the relationship between Modernism and its manifestations in the contemporary. In the exhibition—comprised of two new bodies of work and a monumental bronze—Coventry disabuses Modernism of its utopian promise, locating its residue in the debris of the social landscape.

Keith Coventry (b. 1958, Burnley, United Kingdom) was born in Burnley in 1958 and lives and works in London. He attended Brighton Polytechnic 1978– 81 and Chelsea School of Art London 1981– 82. He was featured in the seminal exhibition Sensation at the Royal Academy of Arts, London, in 1997 and in 2006, he received a mid-career retrospective at Glasgow’s Tramway (Art Centre). He was also a co-founder and curator of City Racing, an influential not-for-profit gallery in Kennington, South London from 1988-98.

His work has been exhibited widely in the UK and Europe and is included in collections worldwide, including the British Council; Tate Modern; Arts Council of England; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis;, and The Museum of Modern Art, New York. In 2010 Coventry was awarded the John Moores Painting Prize.His work will be included in Double Act: Art and Comedy, an exhibition presented at The MAC Belfast in May 2016.

Avedon Warhol @ Gagosian / until 23rd April 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue–Sat 10-6

@ Gagosian 6-24 Britannia Street, London WC1X 9JD

Free entry

www.gagosian.com/exhibitions/avedon-warhol

First major exhibition to pair works by Richard Avedon and Andy Warhol. Both artists rose to prominence in postwar America with parallel artistic output that occasionally overlapped. Their most memorable images, produced in response to changing cultural mores, are icons of the twentieth century.

Portraiture was a shared focus of both artists, and they made use of repetition and serialization: Avedon through the reproducible medium of photography, and in his group photographs, for which he meticulously positioned, collaged, and reordered images; Warhol in his method of stacked screenprinting, which enabled the consistent reproduction of an image. Avedon’s distinctive gelatin-silver prints and Warhol’s boldly colored silkscreens variously depict many of the same recognizable faces, including Marella Agnelli, Bianca Jagger, Jacqueline Kennedy, Marilyn Monroe, and Rudolf Nureyev.

Both Avedon and Warhol originated from modest beginnings and had tremendous commercial success working for major magazines in New York, beginning in the 1940s. The 1960s marked artistic turning points for both artists as they moved away increasingly from strictly commercial work towards their mature independent styles. The works in the exhibition, which date from the 1950s through the 1990s, emphasize such common themes as social and political power; the evolving acceptance of cultural differences; the inevitability of mortality; and the glamour and despair of celebrity.

Each gallery will juxtapose works that underscore these themes, beginning with The Family (1976), Avedon’s ambitious conceptual portrayal of sixty-nine individuals at the epicenter of American politics at that time, together with Warhol’s monumental portrait of the revolutionary Mao Tse-tung, Mao (1972). In both works, little emotion or expression is revealed in the sitters’ faces or postures. Such deadpan was a mark of Pop art ambivalence, more commonly associated with Warhol, but equally applicable in this instance to Avedon.

Both artists sought out individuals who were outside, as well as inside, the mainstream. For Avedon, this resulted in the larger-than-lifesize mural of Andy Warhol and members of The Factory (1969), who represented the heart of New York subculture and incarnated the sexual and cultural revolution. Meanwhile, Warhol memorialized the beauty of drag queens—who he once described as “ambulatory archives of ideal moviestar womanhood”—in his pioneering series of silkscreens, Ladies and Gentlemen (1975).

The third gallery contains an extended meditation on the darker side of human existence, as well as its potential salvation: Warhol’s Skull and Guns paintings are juxtaposed with photographs from Avedon’s Brandenburg Gate portfolio, taken during the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989.

Finally, celebrity was a topic that was equally explored by both artists: Avedon in his iconic images of Brigitte Bardot (1959) and Audrey Hepburn (1967); and Warhol in his dramatically rendered superstars, such as Double Elvis (1963) and Four Marilyns (Reversal Series) (1986). Driven by their cosmopolitan awareness and mindfulness of the potential for their work to stir change, as well as their diverse cast of modern muses, Avedon and Warhol harnessed the power of images to reflect the revolutionary social attitudes of their time.

A fully illustrated publication accompanying the exhibition will include essays by Michael Bracewell and Ara H. Merjian, as well as a chronology documenting the artists’ careers and points of intersection.

Richard Avedon was born in New York City in 1923 and died while on assignment for The New Yorker in San Antonio, Texas, in 2004. His work is included in the collections of major museums around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Smithsonian, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, along with countless other institutions worldwide. Avedon’s first museum retrospective was held at the Smithsonian Institution in 1962. Many major museum exhibitions have followed, including those at the Minneapolis Institute of Fine Arts (1970), Museum of Modern Art (1974), Whitney Museum of American Art (1994), and two at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (1978 and 2002). A 2007 retrospective exhibition organized by the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art in Denmark traveled to Milan, Paris, Berlin, Amsterdam, and San Francisco. “Richard Avedon: People” was presented at National Portrait Gallery, Canberra in 2013, and traveled to Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth in 2014, and the Ian Potter Museum of Art, Melbourne from 2014–15.

Andy Warhol was born in Pittsburgh in 1928 and died in New York City in 1987. His work is included in public collections worldwide. His first major exhibition was at Ferus Gallery, Los Angeles, in 1962. Since then, his work has been the subject of numerous exhibitions in museums and galleries throughout the world, including retrospectives at Pasadena Art Museum (1970, traveled to Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Stedelijk van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven; Musée d’Art Moderne, Paris; Tate Gallery, London; and Whitney Museum of American Art, New York); Museum of Modern Art, New York (1989, traveled to Art Institute of Chicago; Hayward Gallery, London; Museum Ludwig, Cologne; Palazzo Reale, Milan; and Musée National d’Art Moderne, Paris); and Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin (2001–02, traveled to Tate Modern, London; and Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles). Recent exhibitions include “Warhol: Headlines,” Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna, Rome (2011–12); “Andy Warhol: Shadows,” Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (2014–15); “Transmitting Andy Warhol,” Tate Liverpool (2014–15); and “Andy Warhol: Campbell’s Soup Cans and Other Works, 1953–1967,” Museum of Modern Art, New York (2015).

Charles Richardson: HEADBONE @ Zabludowicz Collection / until 8th November 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Thursday–Sunday 12–6pm

@ Zabludowicz Collection, 176 Prince of Wales Road, London NW5 3PT

Free entry

www.zabludowiczcollection.com

Exploring themes of male identity and uncertainty. Through the symbolic use of bodies, objects and gestures he navigates the idiosyncrasies that permeate the ‘lifestyles’ of today. Employing images of the absurd Richardson’s approach disarms through dark humour and the staging of infantile wonder.

The exhibition HEADBONE features a new single-channel video has as its central component, extending both the technical ambition and emotional complexity of his practice. Using digital photography Richardson creates 3D models of his own body, and the bodies of others, which are then animated with movement and sound. Bound in everyday detritus the figures appear frozen and mute, yet full of psychological resonance. The video is presented alongside sculptural objects linked to its production, and displayed in an installation constructed from foil-covered board that requires viewers to weave a route through to a final ‘chamber’.

Ryan Gander: Fieldwork @ Lisson Gallery / until 31st October 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Monday-Friday 10:00am-6:00pm
Saturday 11:00am-5:00pm

@ Lisson Gallery, 27 & 52 Bell Street, London NW1 5BU

Free entry

www.lissongallery.com

Ryan Gander returns for a third time to Lisson Gallery with Fieldwork, an exhibition of interlinking new works by the artist, each offering a glimpse of the inspirations that feed his practice.

Encompassing everything including a kitchen sink, the exhibition presents an individuated encyclopaedia that includes a year’s worth of skies, the clothes of absentee statues, a tent, a helium balloon, the artist’s phone number and a pebble beach. As ever with Gander’s art, the forms convened in Fieldwork are elliptic and opaque, starting stories for the viewer to invent or complete.

Occupying the entire back gallery, the titular work Fieldwork 2015 opens a window onto the revolving touchstones of Gander’s art. Objects from the artist’s collection – each seemingly found but on closer inspection uniquely crafted (for instance, a National Trust sign protecting ‘Culturefield’, Gander’s imaginary artistic utopia) – rotate round the room on a vast, walled-off conveyer belt. Views of these items gliding past momentarily (a baseball bat covered in nails, a pair of dead pigeons, a chocolate bar swoosh…) are granted via an aperture in the gallery’s wall, creating a memory game of strange associations and a prism of connections (a chess set, a tortured teddy bear, a dead chick served on a plate with a napkin signed by Picasso…) through which to consider the rest of the exhibition.

A Utopian Stage: Festival of Arts Shiraz-Persepolis @ Whitechapel Gallery / until 4th Oct 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Monday closed
Tuesday 11am–6pm
Wednesday 11am–6pm
Thursday 11am–9pm
Friday 11am–6pm
Saturday 11am–6pm
Sunday 11am–6pm

Free entry

www.whitechapelgallery.org

The ancient Persian ruins of Persepolis were a spectacular backdrop for ‘one of the most adventurous and idiosyncratic festivals in the world’ (Artforum). The Festival of Arts was held around Shiraz, Iran every summer from 1967–1977.

A melting pot of traditional and avant-garde music, theatre and performance, the festival featured artists from both East and West, including the Beatles’ muse, sitar player Ravi Shankar and American composer John Cage, alongside Rwandan drummers and Balinese Gamelan musicians and dancers. Orghast,
a play by poet Ted Hughes and Mahin Tajadod, co-directed by Peter Brook, was staged, while Merce Cunningham’s dancers performed calisthenics among the ruins of Persepolis.

The festival came to an end with the Iranian revolution, but is now brought to life through this display of archive film and photographs, original theatre programmes and posters seen for the first time in the UK.

Nicholas Mangan: Ancient Lights @ Chisenhale / until 30th August 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Wed-Sun 1pm–6pm

@ Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Road, London E3 5QZ

Free entry

www.chisenhale.org.uk

Major new film installation by Melbourne-based artist Nicholas Mangan that continues his recent investigations into the relationship between energy and social transformation.

Ancient Lights is the first solo exhibition of Mangan’s work in the UK and comprises two new films, presented within a specially conceived installation powered entirely by an on-site solar PV system. This new work is the culmination of Mangan’s extended research into the physical and conceptual power of the sun, and the role that it has played in human economy, culture and technology throughout history.

 

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