Tag: gallery (page 1 of 13)

Mary Heilmann: Looking at Pictures @ Whitechapel Gallery / 21st August 2016


Doors: Tue-Sun 11am-6pm

@ Whitechapel Gallery, Galleries 1, 8 & 9, 77-82 Whitechapel High Street, London E1 7QX

Free entry


The surreal beach life of Los Angeles, 1960s counter culture, pop songs and friendships with New York artists, poets and musicians are the well springs of Mary Heilmann’s dazzling abstractions.

Heilmann (b. 1940) takes colour, line and shape on unexpected journeys. Polka dots waft across eye-popping hues corralled within irregular rectangles. The poetry of her works lies in the tension between the rigours of geometry and the contingencies of the human and the organic.

The exhibition begins with paintings based on the square, the grid and architectural details, such as The First Vent (1972). They are juxtaposed with glazed ceramics, hovering between painting and sculpture. A slide show, Her Life (2006), features Heilmann’s paintings and personal photographs set to an eclectic mix of music.

Choreographed across Gallery 8, dynamic canvases represent ‘autobiographical markers’ – painterly haikus of the artist’s life. Their vibrancy is matched by their titles – Bush of Ghosts (1980) or Good Vibrations Diptych, Remembering David (2012). Heilmann invites the viewer to become immersed in her synaesthetic stories while sitting in her colourful chairs.

White Black Gold: Keith Coventry @ PACE London / until 28th May 2016


Doors: 10-6 Tuesday-Saturday

@ PACE London, 6 Burlington Gardens, London W1S 3ET

Free entry


Multi-decade exploration of the relationship between Modernism and its manifestations in the contemporary. In the exhibition—comprised of two new bodies of work and a monumental bronze—Coventry disabuses Modernism of its utopian promise, locating its residue in the debris of the social landscape.

Keith Coventry (b. 1958, Burnley, United Kingdom) was born in Burnley in 1958 and lives and works in London. He attended Brighton Polytechnic 1978– 81 and Chelsea School of Art London 1981– 82. He was featured in the seminal exhibition Sensation at the Royal Academy of Arts, London, in 1997 and in 2006, he received a mid-career retrospective at Glasgow’s Tramway (Art Centre). He was also a co-founder and curator of City Racing, an influential not-for-profit gallery in Kennington, South London from 1988-98.

His work has been exhibited widely in the UK and Europe and is included in collections worldwide, including the British Council; Tate Modern; Arts Council of England; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis;, and The Museum of Modern Art, New York. In 2010 Coventry was awarded the John Moores Painting Prize.His work will be included in Double Act: Art and Comedy, an exhibition presented at The MAC Belfast in May 2016.

Avedon Warhol @ Gagosian / until 23rd April 2016


Doors: Tue–Sat 10-6

@ Gagosian 6-24 Britannia Street, London WC1X 9JD

Free entry


First major exhibition to pair works by Richard Avedon and Andy Warhol. Both artists rose to prominence in postwar America with parallel artistic output that occasionally overlapped. Their most memorable images, produced in response to changing cultural mores, are icons of the twentieth century.

Portraiture was a shared focus of both artists, and they made use of repetition and serialization: Avedon through the reproducible medium of photography, and in his group photographs, for which he meticulously positioned, collaged, and reordered images; Warhol in his method of stacked screenprinting, which enabled the consistent reproduction of an image. Avedon’s distinctive gelatin-silver prints and Warhol’s boldly colored silkscreens variously depict many of the same recognizable faces, including Marella Agnelli, Bianca Jagger, Jacqueline Kennedy, Marilyn Monroe, and Rudolf Nureyev.

Both Avedon and Warhol originated from modest beginnings and had tremendous commercial success working for major magazines in New York, beginning in the 1940s. The 1960s marked artistic turning points for both artists as they moved away increasingly from strictly commercial work towards their mature independent styles. The works in the exhibition, which date from the 1950s through the 1990s, emphasize such common themes as social and political power; the evolving acceptance of cultural differences; the inevitability of mortality; and the glamour and despair of celebrity.

Each gallery will juxtapose works that underscore these themes, beginning with The Family (1976), Avedon’s ambitious conceptual portrayal of sixty-nine individuals at the epicenter of American politics at that time, together with Warhol’s monumental portrait of the revolutionary Mao Tse-tung, Mao (1972). In both works, little emotion or expression is revealed in the sitters’ faces or postures. Such deadpan was a mark of Pop art ambivalence, more commonly associated with Warhol, but equally applicable in this instance to Avedon.

Both artists sought out individuals who were outside, as well as inside, the mainstream. For Avedon, this resulted in the larger-than-lifesize mural of Andy Warhol and members of The Factory (1969), who represented the heart of New York subculture and incarnated the sexual and cultural revolution. Meanwhile, Warhol memorialized the beauty of drag queens—who he once described as “ambulatory archives of ideal moviestar womanhood”—in his pioneering series of silkscreens, Ladies and Gentlemen (1975).

The third gallery contains an extended meditation on the darker side of human existence, as well as its potential salvation: Warhol’s Skull and Guns paintings are juxtaposed with photographs from Avedon’s Brandenburg Gate portfolio, taken during the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989.

Finally, celebrity was a topic that was equally explored by both artists: Avedon in his iconic images of Brigitte Bardot (1959) and Audrey Hepburn (1967); and Warhol in his dramatically rendered superstars, such as Double Elvis (1963) and Four Marilyns (Reversal Series) (1986). Driven by their cosmopolitan awareness and mindfulness of the potential for their work to stir change, as well as their diverse cast of modern muses, Avedon and Warhol harnessed the power of images to reflect the revolutionary social attitudes of their time.

A fully illustrated publication accompanying the exhibition will include essays by Michael Bracewell and Ara H. Merjian, as well as a chronology documenting the artists’ careers and points of intersection.

Richard Avedon was born in New York City in 1923 and died while on assignment for The New Yorker in San Antonio, Texas, in 2004. His work is included in the collections of major museums around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Smithsonian, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, along with countless other institutions worldwide. Avedon’s first museum retrospective was held at the Smithsonian Institution in 1962. Many major museum exhibitions have followed, including those at the Minneapolis Institute of Fine Arts (1970), Museum of Modern Art (1974), Whitney Museum of American Art (1994), and two at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (1978 and 2002). A 2007 retrospective exhibition organized by the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art in Denmark traveled to Milan, Paris, Berlin, Amsterdam, and San Francisco. “Richard Avedon: People” was presented at National Portrait Gallery, Canberra in 2013, and traveled to Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth in 2014, and the Ian Potter Museum of Art, Melbourne from 2014–15.

Andy Warhol was born in Pittsburgh in 1928 and died in New York City in 1987. His work is included in public collections worldwide. His first major exhibition was at Ferus Gallery, Los Angeles, in 1962. Since then, his work has been the subject of numerous exhibitions in museums and galleries throughout the world, including retrospectives at Pasadena Art Museum (1970, traveled to Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Stedelijk van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven; Musée d’Art Moderne, Paris; Tate Gallery, London; and Whitney Museum of American Art, New York); Museum of Modern Art, New York (1989, traveled to Art Institute of Chicago; Hayward Gallery, London; Museum Ludwig, Cologne; Palazzo Reale, Milan; and Musée National d’Art Moderne, Paris); and Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin (2001–02, traveled to Tate Modern, London; and Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles). Recent exhibitions include “Warhol: Headlines,” Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna, Rome (2011–12); “Andy Warhol: Shadows,” Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (2014–15); “Transmitting Andy Warhol,” Tate Liverpool (2014–15); and “Andy Warhol: Campbell’s Soup Cans and Other Works, 1953–1967,” Museum of Modern Art, New York (2015).

Charles Richardson: HEADBONE @ Zabludowicz Collection / until 8th November 2015


Doors: Thursday–Sunday 12–6pm

@ Zabludowicz Collection, 176 Prince of Wales Road, London NW5 3PT

Free entry


Exploring themes of male identity and uncertainty. Through the symbolic use of bodies, objects and gestures he navigates the idiosyncrasies that permeate the ‘lifestyles’ of today. Employing images of the absurd Richardson’s approach disarms through dark humour and the staging of infantile wonder.

The exhibition HEADBONE features a new single-channel video has as its central component, extending both the technical ambition and emotional complexity of his practice. Using digital photography Richardson creates 3D models of his own body, and the bodies of others, which are then animated with movement and sound. Bound in everyday detritus the figures appear frozen and mute, yet full of psychological resonance. The video is presented alongside sculptural objects linked to its production, and displayed in an installation constructed from foil-covered board that requires viewers to weave a route through to a final ‘chamber’.

Ryan Gander: Fieldwork @ Lisson Gallery / until 31st October 2015


Monday-Friday 10:00am-6:00pm
Saturday 11:00am-5:00pm

@ Lisson Gallery, 27 & 52 Bell Street, London NW1 5BU

Free entry


Ryan Gander returns for a third time to Lisson Gallery with Fieldwork, an exhibition of interlinking new works by the artist, each offering a glimpse of the inspirations that feed his practice.

Encompassing everything including a kitchen sink, the exhibition presents an individuated encyclopaedia that includes a year’s worth of skies, the clothes of absentee statues, a tent, a helium balloon, the artist’s phone number and a pebble beach. As ever with Gander’s art, the forms convened in Fieldwork are elliptic and opaque, starting stories for the viewer to invent or complete.

Occupying the entire back gallery, the titular work Fieldwork 2015 opens a window onto the revolving touchstones of Gander’s art. Objects from the artist’s collection – each seemingly found but on closer inspection uniquely crafted (for instance, a National Trust sign protecting ‘Culturefield’, Gander’s imaginary artistic utopia) – rotate round the room on a vast, walled-off conveyer belt. Views of these items gliding past momentarily (a baseball bat covered in nails, a pair of dead pigeons, a chocolate bar swoosh…) are granted via an aperture in the gallery’s wall, creating a memory game of strange associations and a prism of connections (a chess set, a tortured teddy bear, a dead chick served on a plate with a napkin signed by Picasso…) through which to consider the rest of the exhibition.

A Utopian Stage: Festival of Arts Shiraz-Persepolis @ Whitechapel Gallery / until 4th Oct 2015


Monday closed
Tuesday 11am–6pm
Wednesday 11am–6pm
Thursday 11am–9pm
Friday 11am–6pm
Saturday 11am–6pm
Sunday 11am–6pm

Free entry


The ancient Persian ruins of Persepolis were a spectacular backdrop for ‘one of the most adventurous and idiosyncratic festivals in the world’ (Artforum). The Festival of Arts was held around Shiraz, Iran every summer from 1967–1977.

A melting pot of traditional and avant-garde music, theatre and performance, the festival featured artists from both East and West, including the Beatles’ muse, sitar player Ravi Shankar and American composer John Cage, alongside Rwandan drummers and Balinese Gamelan musicians and dancers. Orghast,
a play by poet Ted Hughes and Mahin Tajadod, co-directed by Peter Brook, was staged, while Merce Cunningham’s dancers performed calisthenics among the ruins of Persepolis.

The festival came to an end with the Iranian revolution, but is now brought to life through this display of archive film and photographs, original theatre programmes and posters seen for the first time in the UK.

Nicholas Mangan: Ancient Lights @ Chisenhale / until 30th August 2015


Doors: Wed-Sun 1pm–6pm

@ Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Road, London E3 5QZ

Free entry


Major new film installation by Melbourne-based artist Nicholas Mangan that continues his recent investigations into the relationship between energy and social transformation.

Ancient Lights is the first solo exhibition of Mangan’s work in the UK and comprises two new films, presented within a specially conceived installation powered entirely by an on-site solar PV system. This new work is the culmination of Mangan’s extended research into the physical and conceptual power of the sun, and the role that it has played in human economy, culture and technology throughout history.


Fighting History @ Tate Britain / until 13th September 2015


Doors: 10.00–18.00 daily

Tickets: £12 book online

@ Tate Britain, Millbank London SW1P 4RG


From Ancient Rome to recent political upheavals, Fighting History looks at how artists have transformed significant events into paintings and artworks that encourage us to reflect on our own place in history.

From the epic 18th century history paintings by John Singleton Copley and Benjamin West to 20th century and contemporary pieces by Richard Hamilton and Dexter Dalwood, the exhibition explores how artists have reacted to key historic events, and how they capture and interpret the past.

Often vast in scale, history paintings engage with important narratives from the past, from scripture and from current affairs. Some scenes protest against state oppression, while others move the viewer with heroic acts, tragic deaths and the plights of individuals swept up in events beyond their control. The Death of Amy Robsart by William Frederick Yeames, which has been newly conserved for this exhibition, casts a spotlight on a historical mystery while John Minton’s The Death of Nelson offers a tender perspective on the death of one of England’s greatest naval commanders.

The exhibition also shows how contemporary artists, such as Turner Prize winner Jeremy Deller, continue to engage with the traditions of history painting to confront modern-day tragedies and dilemmas.

Coral Reefs: Secret Cities of the Sea @ Natural History Museum / until 13th September 2015


Doors: 10am–5.50pm

Tickets: £10 book online

@ Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD


Our oceans are changing and coral reefs tell us how. Coral reefs are home to almost a quarter of all marine species. In this new exhibition you will meet the inhabitants of these richly diverse habitats, and find out why reefs are so important and how their future is being secured.

Encounter 250 strange and beautiful specimens from our collections including the gigantic Turbinaria coral, the venomous blue-ringed octopus and coral collected by Charles Darwin.

Take a virtual reef dive, see live sea coral and fish in our aquarium and enjoy spectacular underwater photography.

The London Illustration Fair @ Hoxton Arches / from Friday 10th July until Sunday 12th July 2015


Friday 2pm–10pm
Saturday 12–8pm
Sunday 12–6pm

@ Hoxton Arches, Arch 402, London E2 8HD

Tickets: £5 general admission (students get 50% off Friday launch party tickets with promotional code ‘cosmic’)


Back with their fourth event Summer Festival: Psychedelia. A psychedelic inspired cosmic universe, showcasing mind altering artworks from creative agencies, collectives, publications, textile designers, visual artists and print studios from around the UK.

Line-up and activities:
14 exhibitor stands, including Material Gallery, Belly Kids, Pirrip Press, Brothers of the Stripe, Ben Oakley Gallery, East London Printmakers, Not Another Bill, The Flood Gallery and many more.

A featured wall, exhibiting exclusive prints from a selection of handpicked artists. Keep you eyes peeled for the likes of Steve Thomas, Paul Blow, Saskia Pomeroy, Supermundane and Pâté. But hurry, each print is in an edition of 20 so once it’s sold, it’s gone for good!

‘Print your own Magic Mushroom’ screen printing workshop with Hello Print Studio, silent Wes Wilson auction, The London Illustration Fair print shop, street food vendors, live music, DJs and a fully stocked summer bar.

Signage tomfoolery! @hoxton_arches

A photo posted by The London Illustration Fair (@thelondonillustrationfair) on

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