Anita Witek @ L’etangere gallery / until 2nd May 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Wed-Sat 11am-6pm

@ L’etangere gallery, 44a Charlotte Road, London, EC2A 3PD

Free entry

www.letrangere.net

First UK solo exhibition of the celebrated Austrian artist, Anita Witek. The show, which encompasses installation, montage and photography is concerned with the production and representation of images within the field of photography, and will be displayed in a series of constructed spaces within the gallery.

From sculptural installation to photomontage, Witek renders multiple slippages between two and three dimensionality. It is this process of simultaneously ‘making’ and ‘breaking’ space, of moving within and beyond the pictorial plane and also the inside/outside spaces of the gallery itself, that reveals the innately artificial and mimetic nature of the photographic medium.

Central to Witek’s practice is the artistic process of photomontage. Her extensive archive of printed matter, consisting of contemporary and historical magazines, newspapers, found books, and posters, provide the material for her working process. By dissecting, detaching and cutting into these materials Witek not only interferes with the tension of their surfaces, but also questions and destabilises their initial content.

Witek has recently continued this de-contextualisation of the imagery with which we are consistently bombarded through the use of the material on which billboard advertisements are printed. These large-scale, consumer-driven bulletins are recycled and reformed into the artist’s colour palette; the original image becomes lost within the sculptural installation that the viewer is left with. Witek’s process comments on contemporary modes of image- making and the potentially endless chains of derivatives to which one single photograph is subject to. No longer is the index embedded within the signifying photograph, but instead it becomes just one step in a continuous flux of material; its context and history is constantly subject to re-appropriation.

Although Witek’s images may be anti-narrative in the traditional sense, being devoid of any visual connections between speaking subjects, this rupture allows for the temporal perception of the spectator to be brought forward. As the gaze moves over the image, deducing and carving a pathway through its many layers, Witek releases what avant-garde filmmaker, Malcolm Le Grice, calls ‘spectator time’: vision as function.

Kemistry Gallery: 100 Years of Graphic Art @ Protein Studios / until Sunday 15th March 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10am – 6pm (weekends 10am – 5pm)

@ Protein Studios, 31 New Inn Yard, London EC2A 3EY

Free entry

www.kemistrygallery.co.uk

Ranging from 1914 to the present day, the exhibition is a unique Kemistry-curated retrospective of some of the most iconic and exciting moments in graphic design history.

Artists include Alan Fletcher, Fredun Shapur, Hans Hillman, Ken Garland, Lou Dorfsman, Seymour Chwast and Milton Glaser, Saul Bass, Anthony Burrill, James Joyce, Jean Jullien, Geoff McFetridge, Parra, Rob Lowe, Ryan Todd, Stefan Glerum, Zero Per Zero, Experimental Jetset, Geneviève Gauckler, plus anonymous works from important private collections of classic design images, including Polish cinema posters of the 1960s and the propaganda images of the Latin American radicals OSPAAL.

For ten years London’s Kemistry Gallery has been the UK’s leading exhibition space for cutting-edge graphic design, supporting and showcasing the brightest emerging talents (including Parra, UVA, Ben Eine and Yoni Alter) and classic masters (from Saul Bass and Ken Garland to Milton Glaser and Seymour Chwast) alike.

John Gerrard: Farm @ Thomas Dane Gallery / until 21st March 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Fri 11-6pm, Sat 12-6pm

@ Thomas Dane Gallery, 3 & 11 Duke Street St James’s, London SW1Y 6BN

Free entry

www.thomasdanegallery.com

A second solo exhibition by Irish artist, John Gerrard (b. Dublin 1974) consisting of two new works. Gerrard is widely regarded as a pioneer of digital media. Deceptively looking like film or video, his works are simulations – virtual worlds, made using real-time computer graphics, a technology developed by the military and now used extensively in the gaming industry. Often exploring geographically isolated locations – be they the agrarian American Great Plains, remote reaches of the Gobi Desert, or sites of military exercises in Djibouti – the works frequently refer to structures of power and networks of energy that have coincided with the expansion of human endeavor in the past century. In Gerrard’s two new works, hyper-technology meets this sense of isolation again.

In early 2014, following his denial of access by Google Inc, Gerrard hired a helicopter and produced a detailed photographic survey of one the key physical sites of the internet – a Google data server building in Oklahoma, also known as a ‘data farm’. This survey was the starting point of his new work entitled Farm (Pryor Creek, Oklahoma), 2015. It features a simulated ‘twin’ of the squat building flanked by diesel generators and powerful cooling towers. The work extends Gerrard’s ‘Grow Finish Unit’ series, which focuses on architecturally similar, computer-controlled park production units in the Midwestern USA.

#JohnGerrard Farm still captivating visitors #Google #DataFarm #PryorCreek #Oaklahoma

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Richard Serra @ Gagosian Gallery / extended until Wednesday 4th March 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue–Sat 10-6

@ Gagosian Gallery, 6-24 Britannia Street, London WC1X 9JD

Free entry

www.gagosian.com

Richard Serra was born in San Francisco in 1938. He studied at the University of California (Berkeley and Santa Barbara) and at Yale University. He has lived in New York since 1966. His first solo exhibitions were held at Galleria La Salita, Rome (1966), and at the Leo Castelli Warehouse, New York (1969). His first solo museum exhibition was presented at Pasadena Art Museum (1970). Serra has since participated in several Documenta exhibitions (Kassel, 1972, 1977, 1982, and 1987), and in the Venice Biennales of 1980, 1984, 2001, and 2013. Serra’s work has been shown in numerous solo museum exhibitions at Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1977); Centre Pompidou, Paris (1984); Museum of Modern Art, New York (1986 and 2007); and other museums in Europe, the U.S., and Latin America. In 2005, eight large-scale works were permanently installed at Guggenheim Museum Bilbao. A traveling survey of Serra’s drawings was on view in 2011–12 at Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; and Menil Collection, Houston. In April 2014, Serra installed a major permanent landscape sculpture in the desert of the Brouq Nature Reserve in western Qatar.

This Comedian – Idil Sukan @ Embassy Tea Gallery / until Sunday 8th March 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 12pm-7pm

@ Embassy Tea Gallery, 195-205 Union Street, London SE1 0LN

Free entry

www.embassyteagallery.co.uk

An exhibition of photographs of comedians from the last decade: A retrospective of Idil Sukan’s creative work in the comedy industry. One of the best known and prolific photographers working in comedy, her work appears across comedy festivals, billboards, the press and has been collected by the National Portrait Gallery. The exhibition will also include a selection of her publicity and poster designs for dozens of comedy shows she has worked on over the years.

Some 200 of Idil’s photographs of live performance will be exhibited including much-loved comedians such as Eddie Izzard, Clive Anderson and Paul Merton; actors who appear in comedy sitcoms and films, including Patrick Stewart, Olivia Colman and Peter Capaldi; and recent breakthrough artists such as Bridget Christie, Daniel Rigby, Alice Lowe and The Penny Dreadfuls.

The exhibition will also include never-before-seen-images from around the comedy world and Idil’s famous behind-the-scenes photographs of The Muppets.

Tony Oursler: template/variant/friend/stranger @ Lisson Gallery / until 7th March 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Monday-Friday 10:00am-6:00pm
Saturday 11:00am-5:00pm

@ Lisson Gallery, 29 Bell Street, London NW1 5DA

Free entry

www.lissongallery.com

The first new work centres around the Oursler’s fascination with the evolution of identity via techniques of facial recognition technology.

He explores the nuanced ramifications of these tools increasing ubiquity in daily life. His interest in the face as the locus of communication and identity, through features, movement and expression, is central to these works.

A series of seven imposing photographic visages looms over the spectator in the main gallery, all but one punctured by video screens of eyes or mouths. One of part of the installation is an endlessly shifting projection of 150 algorithmically produced Eigen faces, revealing the beautiful yet distinctly non-human qualities of biometric analysis.

One of the artist’s intentions is to “invite the viewer to glimpse themselves from another perspective, that of the machines we have recently created”. Each of these giant portrait heads bears the network of marks or nodes associated with different facial recognition systems, used by border controls, law enforcement agencies and even ATM machines.

The images, staggered maze-like throughout the space in the manner of theatrical props, present themselves as potential police mug shots, closed-circuit camera stills or anonymous faces in the crowd, albeit magnified in scale and distorted by their mediation through surveillance technology.

Tony Oursler's new work is about facial recognition systems and the impact of surveillance technology on our rapidly evolving definition of identity. In the exhibition Tony Oursler – template/variant/friend/stranger, an installation titled GEN is an endlessly shifting projection of 150 algorithmically produced Eigen faces, revealing the beautiful yet distinctly non-human qualities of biometric analysis. One of the artist’s intentions is to “invite the viewer to glimpse themselves from another perspective, that of the machines we have recently created”. But at the moment even the most advanced facial recognition technology can be thwarted by even small alterations to the appearance of a face. Obscuring key features, shadows, movement, applying markings or makeup which disrupts the symmetry of your features or even looking down make it difficult for a facial recognition system to identify you. In this portion of the film 'Dazzle' makeup is applied to a face as anti-face-recognition camo that protects against being identified. #noIDselfie #antiselfie @TonyOursler #TonyOursler #LissonGallery #facialrecognition #facialrecognitionsoftware #facialrecognitiontechnology #patternrecognition#profiling #privacy #CCTV #identity #ID #biometrics #surveillance #artificialintelligence #AI #antiselfie #Cameras #Algorithms #Faces #Makeup #Facerecognition #Patterns #Technology

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History Is Now: Seven Artists Take on Britain @ Hayward Gallery / until 26th April 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Mon noon-6pm
Tue, Wed, Sat, Sun 11am-7pm
Thu, Fri 11am-8pm

@ Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, London SE1 8XX

Tickets: from £11

www.southbankcentre.co.uk

In the run-up to the 2015 General Election, History Is Now offers a radical new way of thinking about how we got to where we are today.

John Akomfrah, Simon Fujiwara, Roger Hiorns, Hannah Starkey, Richard Wentworth and Jane and Louise Wilson have each been invited to curate sections of the exhibition, looking at particular periods of cultural history.

Their varied and highly original curatorial ‘takes’ on Britain provide fresh perspectives and illuminate key moments in the nation’s journey from the post-war period to the present day.

The artists pursue inventive ways of exploring our recent history, spanning ideas and topics as varied as the Cold War, post-Thatcherite society, protest movements, feminism, BSE, and celebrity culture.

They present over 250 objects from both public and private art collections as well as everyday artefacts including maps, costumes, newspapers, films, and personal diaries, together with scientific and military displays.

Damien Hirst LOVE @ Paul Stolper / 21st February 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Monday-Saturday 10-6pm

@ Paul Stolper, 31 Museum Street, London WC1A 1LH

Free entry

www.paulstolper.com

Paul Stolper is proud to present LOVE, a pop-up exhibition of prints and sculptural editions by Damien Hirst. The exhibition will run from the 9th of February to the 21st of February 2015, over Valentine’s Day, and will focus exclusively on the theme of love.

The exhibition includes ‘LOVE Gold’, a portfolio of love heart prints each foil blocked with a single butterfly. Eight of the hearts are silkscreened and six are in gold leaf. Damien Hirst’s ‘LOVE Gold’ is the first of two portfolios, the second, titled ‘LOVE Silver’, will be released in June 2015. It will include eight silkscreen prints in colours different to ‘LOVE Gold’ and six prints in silver leaf, each foil blocked with a single butterfly.

Also included will be two love heart pill sculptures ‘♡YU4EVA’, as well as ‘Love Struck’, a heart pierced by a crossbow bolt suspended in a sweet jar.

Holly Hendry: More and more, more is more @ Bosse & Baum / until

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Thursday–Friday 12pm–6pm

@ Bosse & Baum, 133 Copeland Road, London SE15 3SN

Free entry

www.bosseandbaum.com

The exhibition reflects some of the text’s preoccupations with our use of space, spreading like a toxic mass across the planet uniting shopping malls, airports, hotels and art galleries. Space, according to Koolhaas, is sealed together by skin, like a bubble, and is investigated through its containers: ‘all theory for the production of space is based on an obsessive preoccupation with its opposite …architecture’. Titled ‘More and more, more is more,’ after a phrase from Rem Koolhaas’ essay Junkspace, a lament for modern architecture.

Helen Carmel Benigson: Anxious, Stressful, Insomnia Fat @ Carroll / Fletcher / until 21st February 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10:00-18:00

@ Carroll / Fletcher, 56 – 57 Eastcastle Street, London W1W 8EQ

Free entry

www.carrollfletcher.com

Inspired by a recent health app purchase that monitors women’s bodies, Benigson’s latest exhibition interrogates the flatness prescribed by the Internet onto the body, confronting the strange continuum existing between our dematerialised, virtual lives and our ‘real-life’ selves. She creates highly visceral and sensual environments which reference pop culture, contemporary game playing and animation. Sexually charged images and sounds based on her own body and rapper-persona (Princess Belsize Dollar), or actors and dancers who act as her stand­ins, often take centre stage in frenzied, schizophrenic performances.

From projected videos of flesh to digital-print cut outs of flattened bodies, the works in Anxious, Stressful, Insomnia Fat all address core concerns in Benigson’s practice which emphasises performance within the space of the screen, and explores the negotiation of identity, territory and embodiment within cyberspace.

Her exhibition follows on from her 2014 exhibition and residency Weightloss Utopias at Site Gallery, Sheffield which centred on issues of weightlessness and the perception of physical mass within online space. During the residency, Benigson staged a series of real and scripted weight-loss support groups that took place within a multi-screen video installation. These weight‐loss support group members then became avatars – digitalized versions of themselves within her videos, questioning the dematerialisation of the body through coding and information. At Carroll / Fletcher, Benigson will present four new video works made especially for the exhibition in a psychedelic digital carnival, which repetitively enacts the blurred boundaries between performer, producer and spectator, intrinsic to online video sharing.

Helen Carmel Benigson (b.1985, London) was recently involved in Platform, a residency programme at Sheffield’s Site Gallery and the LUX Associate Artist Program. Recent solo exhibitions include: Performa.13 After Hours, New York; Going to Africa via a Machine Called a Sunbed, Meantime Project Space, Cheltenham and the Irma Stern Museum, Cape Town; and Palm Trees and Poker Players at UCA, Farnham and Breathe Harder, a site-specific performance at Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Recent group exhibitions include: Ericka Beckman: Image games – work in context at Tate Modern, London; Videonale.14 at the Kunstmuseum, Bonn, Lagos and Odessa; Videocracy at The Centre for Contemporary Art, Tel Aviv and The House in the Sky at Concrete, Hayward Gallery, London. In 2014, Benigson was awarded a Clarendon Scholarship to support her DPhil at the Ruskin School of Art, University of Oxford.