Tag: interesting exhibitions

The Currency of Communism at British Museum until 18 March 2018

This display looks at the changing roles of currency and exchange in communist states in the century since the 1917 Russian Revolution. 🤑 🤑 🤑

Communism proposes that money has no role in a utopian society. To date though, no communist state has successfully removed money from its economy. In the last 100 years, communism has existed in various forms in dozens of states all around in the world. From eastern Europe to Southeast Asia, this display examines the role of money in communist states, as well as the iconography and imagery associated with it.

Within communist economies, concepts of value and wealth are eroded and distorted, and the national currency becomes just one of various means of exchange. The display features examples of how the value of money has been reduced by communist states. East German coins made from aluminium demonstrate how communist currency was deliberately made to feel light and cheap. Adverts for savings banks from the USSR show how consumer benefits were left out of advertising in favour of information explaining how savings benefit the state.

With the reduced role of currency, communist states introduced different reward systems, starting in Russia in the 1930s. Stalin said people were to be measured ‘by their heroic feats’. A worker who exceeded their factory quota may receive the Order of the Badge of Honour, and a mother who raised nine children would receive the Order of Maternal Glory, First Class. These awards came with monetary bonuses, and allowed recipients access to a better quality of life due to the perks that came with them.

The collapse of the Soviet Union and the transition to democracy in the early 1990s had a huge effect on former communist states. With borders and economies suddenly open after many years, new ideas and imagery soon began to circulate, along with new national currencies. Today there are only four states with planned economies – China, Laos, Cuba and Vietnam. Trading relations between them and capitalist countries have become normalised, but concepts of currency and political ideology continue to evolve.

www.britishmuseum.org/whats_on/exhibitions/the_currency_of_communism

Location:
British Museum, Great Russell Street, London WC1B 3DG

Times:
10am – 5:30pm (Friday until 8:30pm)

Price:
Free entry

Basquiat: Boom for Real at Barbican Art Gallery until 28 January 2018

Basquiat shocked with enigmatic paintings focused on subjects as disparate as graffiti, jazz, classicism, his Caribbean heritage and contemporary racial politics. A self-taught artist and former graffitist his rise to fame was meteoritic. The face of underground culture, he performed in the film New York Beat alongside Debbie Harry, collaborated with Andy Warhol, produced murals and installations for hip nightclubs and embarked on a brief romance with Madonna (rumour has it he introduced the fledgling pop star to gallerist Larry Gagosian and foretold her stardom).

Although he is best known for his frenetic canvases, Basquiat also experimented with textiles, music, poetry, photography, film and even drawing in his own blood. In his tragically short life he produced an astounding amount of work that remarkably still remains unrepresented in any UK collection.

The exhibition seeks to affirm his significance as one of the greatest painters of the 20th century, while also exploring his position as a key figure of popular culture during this period. The show includes important paintings, film clips and his lesser-known drawings.

Location:
Barbican Art Gallery, Level 3, Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS

Times:
Thu – Sat 10am – 10pm
Sun – Wed 10am – 6pm

Price:
£16 book online

Richard Serra @ Gagosian / until 13th April 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue–Sat 10am-6pm

@ Gagosian, 6-24 Britannia Street, London WC1X 9JD

Free entry

www.gagosian.com/exhibitions/

Exhibition featuring large-scale steel sculptures by Richard Serra.

From San Francisco, born in 1938 and lived in New York since 1966. He studied at the University of California (Berkeley and Santa Barbara) and at Yale University. He was awarded the insignia of Chevalier de la légion d’honneur by the French government in June 2015.

Since 1983, Gagosian has presented more than thirty major exhibitions of Serra’s sculptures and drawings in the United States and Europe.

Good Day art exhibition @ Stour Space / until Friday 3rd February 2017 ??

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 9am-5pm daily

@ Stour Space, 7 Roach Road, Tower Hamlets, London E3 2PA

Free entry

www.stourspace.co.uk/portfolio/good-day-january-2017

January 20th 2017 is the day that President-elect Trump takes office. Unbeknownst to many, January 20th also happens to be the day Ice Cube rapped about in his seminal song It Was A Good Day.

A group of artists are celebrating Ice Cube and his positive song with an exhibition dedicated to It Was A Good Day.

It Was A Good Day by Ice Cube was released in 1992, and using the song’s lyrics and historic events—like the debut date of Yo! MTV Raps and results of games between the Lakers and Sonics—Donovan Strain from Murk Avenue concluded that Ice Cube’s “good day” was Jan. 20, 1992.

Artwork by:
Gary Alford
Uslan Cevet
Daniel Cree
Josh Earle
Andrew Goss
Anna Hanlon
Darren John
Dan Jose
Jane Kenny
Chris Mackenzie-Gray
Alan Merrick
Kyle Nielsen
Claudine O’Sullivan
Silvia Ospina
Patrick Schmidt
Donovan Strain
Coby Walsh

Maps and the 20th Century: Drawing the Line @ British Library / from 4th November 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Mon 09:30-18:00
Tue-Fri 09:30-18:00
Sat 09:30-17:00
Sun 11:00-17:00

@ PACCAR Gallery, The British Library 96 Euston Road, London NW1 2DB

Tickets: £12 book online

www.bl.uk/events/maps-and-the-20th-century-drawing-the-line

Have you ever tried disappearing off the map? It’s harder than you think to be invisible nowadays.

That’s because 100 years of mapping technology – from the original sketch of today’s London Underground to the satellite imagery of the 1990s – has monitored and shaped the society we live in.

Two World Wars. The moon landings. The digital revolution. This exhibition of extraordinary maps looks at the important role they played during the 20th century. It sheds new light on familiar events and spans conflicts, creativity, the ocean floor and even outer space.

It includes exhibits ranging from the first map of the Hundred Acre Wood to secret spy maps, via the New York Subway. And, as technology advances further than we ever imagined possible, it questions what it really means to have your every move mapped.

Edmund Clark: War of Terror @ Imperial War Museum / until next year August 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10am – 6pm

@ Imperial War Museum, Lambeth Road, London SE1 6HZ

Free entry

www.iwm.org.uk/visits/iwm-london/exhibitions/edmundclark

This thought-provoking exhibition brings together several series of work by artist-photographer Edmund Clark to explore the hidden experiences of state control during the ‘Global War on Terror’.

Looking at issues of security, secrecy, representation and legality, the show focuses on the measures taken by states to protect their citizens from the threat of terrorism, and the far-reaching effects of such methods of control.

The exhibition brings together several series of Clark’s work including images and documents of CIA operated secret prisons or ‘black sites’, photographs from the detention camps at Guantanamo Bay, correspondence from around the world sent to a British detainee in Guantanamo that was transformed by the censorship and intervention of the US military, and the experience of a ‘controlled person’ who was placed in a house in suburban England under the restrictive conditions of a control order – a form of house arrest or detention without trial – introduced in 2005.

An immersive experience, the exhibition uses sound, moving images and large multi-media installations as well as photographs and documents to invoke a sensory engagement with the experiences of observation, detention and disorientation induced by the systems of control Clark explores.

Botticelli Reimagined @ V&A / until 3rd July 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10.00-17.45

@ Victoria and Albert Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 2RL

Tickets: £15 book online

www.vam.ac.uk/content/exhibitions/exhibition-botticelli-reimagined

This innovative exhibition will explore the enduring impact of the Florentine painter Sandro Botticelli (1445-1510) from the Pre-Raphaelites to today. The exhibition is organised by the V&A and the Gemäldegalerie – Staatliche Museen zu Berlin.

Sandro Botticelli (1445-1510) is recognised as one of the greatest artists of all time. His celebrated images are firmly embedded in public consciousness and his influence permeates art, design, fashion and film. However, although lauded in his lifetime, Botticelli was largely forgotten for more than 300 years until his work was progressively rediscovered in the 19th century.

Telling a story 500 years in the making, Botticelli Reimagined will be the largest Botticelli exhibition in Britain since 1930. Including painting, fashion, film, drawing, photography, tapestry, sculpture and print, the exhibition will explore the ways that artists and designers have reinterpreted Botticelli. It will include over 50 original works by Botticelli, alongside works by artists such as Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Edward Burne-Jones, William Morris, René Magritte, Elsa Schiaparelli, Andy Warhol and Cindy Sherman.

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