Tag: interesting exhibitions (page 1 of 2)

Leelee Kimmel: Wormhole at Simon Lee until 30 August 2018

A solo exhibition by New York-based artist Leelee Kimmel, her first in the UK. In her latest work, Kimmel presents a series of large-scale abstract paintings that are confrontational in both colour and dimension, exploring themes of creation and destruction. The immersive element of her work is further developed through sculptural pieces and a five-minute Virtual Reality work that invites total submergence into the deep space of Kimmel’s creative world. 🤓

The large-format paintings feature graphic shapes clustered in thick multilayered pools of bright acrylic paint, which weave across fields of solid white or black. The paintings are imbued with a restless energy and freedom that is intrinsically linked with how the artist creates her works. The resulting compositions deliberately move in and out of representation, sensuous and strict, gloss and matte, tangled and full. The complex patch-work of imagery, consisting of crosshatch and opposing vector-like lines and patterns as well as interrupting biomorphic forms, has an otherworldly quality. Forceful and nervous lines are reminiscent of artists such as Basquiat and Twombly, while the uncanny worlds and dreamlike atmospheres created by the artist emerge into a sort of mutant realism.

A post shared by Leelee kimmel (@leeleekimmel) on

www.simonleegallery.com

Location:
Simon Lee, 12 Berkeley Street, London W1J 8DT

Times:
Monday – Saturday 10am – 6pm

Price:
Free entry

Eddie Peake: Concrete Pitch at White Cube Bermondsey until 8 April 2018

Featuring new sculpture, painting, sound work and performance presented in an immersive and constructed environment. 🔊 🏙

The works weave autobiographical elements and an examination of self-identity with more general themes of desire, the body, architecture and urban landscape. The title ‘Concrete Pitch’ was inspired by the bare, concrete recreation ground in Finsbury Park in London where Peake grew up, which was used as a playground, a sports field, a meeting place for people of every age, class and ethnicity and location for encounters and scenarios of all kinds. Peake has said: ‘I used to treat things I did like graffiti and football and dance classes as not part of my art, then I had a sort of epiphany. I realised I want all those parts of my life in my art, and vice versa.’ For Peake, whose work can be located within a history of painting and object-making as well as more recent narratives of dance and performance art, the gallery can also be considered a stage; a place to orchestrate dramas of the everyday and to present the rich associative portrait of his childhood neighbourhood as a microcosm of urban, multicultural society.

Peake will be present in the gallery space throughout the exhibition, following a scheduled daily routine. Moving between various constructed spaces which include a private office and a triangular cell-like structure, accessible only by a tall ladder. The artist ‘plays’ himself, both offering up and dismantling the narrative of artistic ego, fictional protagonist and ‘real’ self. In another specially constructed room, visible behind a window, DJs from Kool London broadcast an online radio show during the exhibition. Broadcasting oldskool jungle and drum and bass from East London tower blocks since 1991, Kool FM is one of the longest running underground stations and provided the soundtrack to Peake’s adolescence.

The new, large-scale sound installation, Stroud Green Road runs through the gallery, consisting of a row of steel tables placed in a snaking line, just as the street of the same name runs through Peake’s neighbourhood. On their tray-like surfaces is an array of objects: small-scale sculptures as well as an eclectic selection of items purchased from shops on Stroud Green Road and several small speakers which emit a low, deep register like a wavering vibration or rattle. Composed by the artist using distorted samples and field recordings from the local area, this abstract soundscape creates a continuously looping hum, while a soft pink light floods the exhibition space. Continuing the theme of revealing and concealing, an airy white curtain hangs full-length from the ceiling, creating a natural spiralling passageway, in the centre of which a split-screen projection shows four dancers, each locked in an individual, looping sequence of complex, choreographed movement. The notion of the loop, a key motif within Peake’s work, is manifested in these repetitive movements, in the daily rituals the artist will be observing, in the sonic structure of the sound sculpture and in the music played by the Kool DJs. For Peake, these devices echo the entrapping loops of thought or behaviour associated with compulsion, obsession and depression.

In several new series of paintings, techniques of layering and masking are used to create vivid abstract compositions on canvas or hard, reflective stainless-steel panels. In one group, overlapping, spray-painted rectangles recall the urban patchwork of fly-posters, while in others, graffiti-like mark-making recedes into a bright void. This exploration of the void, whereby elements of the composition are left blank or undone creates works that reflect back to the viewer a sense ennui, even depression. In another group of oil on canvas works, a rainbow-coloured text defines the form of a head in profile spelling out the enigmatic slogans ‘A More Uncomfortable And Realistic History’, and ‘We To The Ramp Go For Relinquish Unearned Privileges And Powers’. Suggesting the direct, angry tone of graffiti, social media and urban music, these works are an expression of ideas that have formerly been implicit in Peake’s work.

www.whitecube.com/exhibitions/eddie_peake_bermondsey_2018

Location:
White Cube Bermondsey, 144 – 152 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ

Times:
Tuesday – Saturday 10am – 6pm
Sunday 12pm – 6pm

Price:
Free entry

Super Sharp at Fashion Space Gallery until Saturday 21 April 2018

Exploring the appropriation of Italian designer brands in the underground music scenes of Jungle and UK Garage. Versace, Moschino, Iceberg and D&G are examples of labels that ruled the dance floor in the nineties. Moschino, in particular, became synonymous with the look associated with that era. This exhibition draws from an extensive archive amassed by DJ and producer Saul Milton, which also forms the core of the wider series of exhibitions RTRN II JUNGLE. 🎤 🔊

Recently, there has been a revival of interest in the music, style and culture of that time. Even though Jungle and UK Garage took place before the emergence of the Internet, their history is extensively documented online. However, the overlap between their style and the various times there was a revived interest in the music, has meant that a blurry nostalgic image of the time has emerged.

This exhibition attempts to address this by highlighting the voices of people who were actually there at the time, such as Goldie, Fabio & Grooverider, Bushkin, Skibadee, Navigator and PJ & Smiley, Jumpin’ Jack Frost and MC Nyke. Their personal memories shed light on why designer clothing was first embraced by Jungle ravers and then made famous by UK Garage. By combining the music, testimonials and the original garments, it reveals why high-end Italian labels were so important to the cultural and style history of both genres.

www.fashionspacegallery.com/exhibition/super-sharp

Location:
Fashion Space Gallery, London College of Fashion, 20 John Princes Street, London W1G 0BJ

Times:
Monday – Friday 10am 6pm
Saturday 12pm – 4pm (during term time)
Sunday closed

Price:
Free entry

Red Star Over Russia: A revolution in visual culture 1905-55 at Tate Modern until 18 February 2018

A dramatic visual history of Russia and the Soviet Union from 1905 to the death of Stalin – seen through the eyes of artists, designers and photographers. 🇷🇺

2017 marks the centenary of the October Revolution. Rebellion brought hope, chaos, heroism and tragedy as the Russian Empire became the Soviet Union, endured revolutions, civil war, famine, dictatorship and Nazi invasion. A new visual culture arose and transformed the fabric of everyday life.

The core of this exhibition comes from the extraordinary collection of photographer and graphic designer David King (1943–2016). He started his collection of over 250,000 items relating to this period while working for The Sunday Times Magazine in the 1970s. The collection was acquired by Tate in 2016.

This show is an opportunity to see the rare propaganda posters, prints and photographs collected by King – some bearing traces of state censorship. Including work by El Lissitzky, Gustav Klutsis, Dmitri Moor, Aleksandr Deineka, Nina Vatolina and Yevgeny Khaldei, it is a thrilling journey through a momentous period in world history.

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/red-star-over-russia

Location:
Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Times:
Sunday – Thursday 10am – 6pm
Friday – Saturday 10am – 10pm

Price:
£11.30 book online

The Currency of Communism at British Museum until 18 March 2018

This display looks at the changing roles of currency and exchange in communist states in the century since the 1917 Russian Revolution. 🤑 🤑 🤑

Communism proposes that money has no role in a utopian society. To date though, no communist state has successfully removed money from its economy. In the last 100 years, communism has existed in various forms in dozens of states all around in the world. From eastern Europe to Southeast Asia, this display examines the role of money in communist states, as well as the iconography and imagery associated with it.

Within communist economies, concepts of value and wealth are eroded and distorted, and the national currency becomes just one of various means of exchange. The display features examples of how the value of money has been reduced by communist states. East German coins made from aluminium demonstrate how communist currency was deliberately made to feel light and cheap. Adverts for savings banks from the USSR show how consumer benefits were left out of advertising in favour of information explaining how savings benefit the state.

With the reduced role of currency, communist states introduced different reward systems, starting in Russia in the 1930s. Stalin said people were to be measured ‘by their heroic feats’. A worker who exceeded their factory quota may receive the Order of the Badge of Honour, and a mother who raised nine children would receive the Order of Maternal Glory, First Class. These awards came with monetary bonuses, and allowed recipients access to a better quality of life due to the perks that came with them.

The collapse of the Soviet Union and the transition to democracy in the early 1990s had a huge effect on former communist states. With borders and economies suddenly open after many years, new ideas and imagery soon began to circulate, along with new national currencies. Today there are only four states with planned economies – China, Laos, Cuba and Vietnam. Trading relations between them and capitalist countries have become normalised, but concepts of currency and political ideology continue to evolve.

www.britishmuseum.org/whats_on/exhibitions/the_currency_of_communism

Location:
British Museum, Great Russell Street, London WC1B 3DG

Times:
10am – 5:30pm (Friday until 8:30pm)

Price:
Free entry

Basquiat: Boom for Real at Barbican Art Gallery until 28 January 2018

Basquiat shocked with enigmatic paintings focused on subjects as disparate as graffiti, jazz, classicism, his Caribbean heritage and contemporary racial politics. A self-taught artist and former graffitist his rise to fame was meteoritic. The face of underground culture, he performed in the film New York Beat alongside Debbie Harry, collaborated with Andy Warhol, produced murals and installations for hip nightclubs and embarked on a brief romance with Madonna (rumour has it he introduced the fledgling pop star to gallerist Larry Gagosian and foretold her stardom).

Although he is best known for his frenetic canvases, Basquiat also experimented with textiles, music, poetry, photography, film and even drawing in his own blood. In his tragically short life he produced an astounding amount of work that remarkably still remains unrepresented in any UK collection.

The exhibition seeks to affirm his significance as one of the greatest painters of the 20th century, while also exploring his position as a key figure of popular culture during this period. The show includes important paintings, film clips and his lesser-known drawings.

Location:
Barbican Art Gallery, Level 3, Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS

Times:
Thu – Sat 10am – 10pm
Sun – Wed 10am – 6pm

Price:
£16 book online

Richard Serra @ Gagosian / until 13th April 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue–Sat 10am-6pm

@ Gagosian, 6-24 Britannia Street, London WC1X 9JD

Free entry

www.gagosian.com/exhibitions/

Exhibition featuring large-scale steel sculptures by Richard Serra.

From San Francisco, born in 1938 and lived in New York since 1966. He studied at the University of California (Berkeley and Santa Barbara) and at Yale University. He was awarded the insignia of Chevalier de la légion d’honneur by the French government in June 2015.

Since 1983, Gagosian has presented more than thirty major exhibitions of Serra’s sculptures and drawings in the United States and Europe.

Good Day art exhibition @ Stour Space / until Friday 3rd February 2017 ??

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 9am-5pm daily

@ Stour Space, 7 Roach Road, Tower Hamlets, London E3 2PA

Free entry

www.stourspace.co.uk/portfolio/good-day-january-2017

January 20th 2017 is the day that President-elect Trump takes office. Unbeknownst to many, January 20th also happens to be the day Ice Cube rapped about in his seminal song It Was A Good Day.

A group of artists are celebrating Ice Cube and his positive song with an exhibition dedicated to It Was A Good Day.

It Was A Good Day by Ice Cube was released in 1992, and using the song’s lyrics and historic events—like the debut date of Yo! MTV Raps and results of games between the Lakers and Sonics—Donovan Strain from Murk Avenue concluded that Ice Cube’s “good day” was Jan. 20, 1992.

Artwork by:
Gary Alford
Uslan Cevet
Daniel Cree
Josh Earle
Andrew Goss
Anna Hanlon
Darren John
Dan Jose
Jane Kenny
Chris Mackenzie-Gray
Alan Merrick
Kyle Nielsen
Claudine O’Sullivan
Silvia Ospina
Patrick Schmidt
Donovan Strain
Coby Walsh

Maps and the 20th Century: Drawing the Line @ British Library / from 4th November 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Mon 09:30-18:00
Tue-Fri 09:30-18:00
Sat 09:30-17:00
Sun 11:00-17:00

@ PACCAR Gallery, The British Library 96 Euston Road, London NW1 2DB

Tickets: £12 book online

www.bl.uk/events/maps-and-the-20th-century-drawing-the-line

Have you ever tried disappearing off the map? It’s harder than you think to be invisible nowadays.

That’s because 100 years of mapping technology – from the original sketch of today’s London Underground to the satellite imagery of the 1990s – has monitored and shaped the society we live in.

Two World Wars. The moon landings. The digital revolution. This exhibition of extraordinary maps looks at the important role they played during the 20th century. It sheds new light on familiar events and spans conflicts, creativity, the ocean floor and even outer space.

It includes exhibits ranging from the first map of the Hundred Acre Wood to secret spy maps, via the New York Subway. And, as technology advances further than we ever imagined possible, it questions what it really means to have your every move mapped.

Edmund Clark: War of Terror @ Imperial War Museum / until next year August 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10am – 6pm

@ Imperial War Museum, Lambeth Road, London SE1 6HZ

Free entry

www.iwm.org.uk/visits/iwm-london/exhibitions/edmundclark

This thought-provoking exhibition brings together several series of work by artist-photographer Edmund Clark to explore the hidden experiences of state control during the ‘Global War on Terror’.

Looking at issues of security, secrecy, representation and legality, the show focuses on the measures taken by states to protect their citizens from the threat of terrorism, and the far-reaching effects of such methods of control.

The exhibition brings together several series of Clark’s work including images and documents of CIA operated secret prisons or ‘black sites’, photographs from the detention camps at Guantanamo Bay, correspondence from around the world sent to a British detainee in Guantanamo that was transformed by the censorship and intervention of the US military, and the experience of a ‘controlled person’ who was placed in a house in suburban England under the restrictive conditions of a control order – a form of house arrest or detention without trial – introduced in 2005.

An immersive experience, the exhibition uses sound, moving images and large multi-media installations as well as photographs and documents to invoke a sensory engagement with the experiences of observation, detention and disorientation induced by the systems of control Clark explores.

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