Tag: London exhibitions (page 1 of 2)

Seth Price Circa 1981 at ICA until 7 January 2018

Seth Price Circa 1981 is a survey exhibition of film and video works by the American artist Seth Price (born 1973, East Jerusalem) stretching from the early 2000s to the present day. 📷 📹

It spans the entire Institute of Contemporary Arts building, with works shown in the Cinema, Bookstore, Lower and Upper Galleries, Canteen.

www.ica.art/whats-on/seth-price-circa-1981

Location:
Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA), The Mall, SW1Y 5AH

Times:
Tue – Sun, 11am – 11pm (Thu until 9pm)

Price:
£1 for a day membership

Fahrelnissa Zeid @ Tate Modern / until 15th October 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10am-6pm, Fri and Sat until 10pm

@ Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: £11.30 book online

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/fahrelnissa-zeid

Indulge in Zeid’s obsession with line and dazzling colour in this exhibition. Rediscover one of the greatest female artists of the 20th century in this first major retrospective.​ 🎨

Trained in both Paris and Istanbul, Fahrelnissa Zeid was an important figure in the Turkish avant-garde d Group in the early 1940s and the École de Paris (School of Paris) in the 1950s. Her vibrant abstract paintings are a synthesis of Islamic, Byzantine, Arab and Persian influences fused with European approaches to abstraction. Many of her abstract works are monumental and demand attention.

Zeid’s reputation as an artist was cemented in the 1950s when she was living between London and Paris and exhibiting extensively internationally. The artist also began experimenting with painting on turkey and chicken bones, which she later cast in polyester resin panels evocative of stained-glass windows. In the later years of her life she unexpectedly returned to figurative painting, creating stylised portraits of her friends and family.

Anime Architecture: Backgrounds of Japan @ House of Illustration / until 10th September 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Sun 10am-6pm

@ House of Illustration, 2 Granary Square, King’s Cross, London N1C 4BH

Tickets: from £7.50 book online

www.houseofillustration.org.uk/whats-on/current-future-events/anime-architecture-backgrounds-of-japan

This is the UK’s first ever exhibition of architectural backdrops from classic anime films. It features over 100 exquisite technical drawings and watercolour illustrations from some of the most influential productions in the genre’s 1990s heyday, including Production I.G’s artwork for Ghost in the Shell. 🎨

The artists were tasked with creating a universe for the director. Their fictional worlds reflected real-life concerns over ruthless urban development and erosion of identity, mirroring the films’ narratives and giving the backgrounds a crucial role to play. Their work has had a defining influence on the style of anime we think of as typical today.

The show includes Hiromasa Ogura’s watercolour paintings for Ghost in the Shell, an anime epic that informed pioneering sci-fi works such as The Matrix and Avatar. Inspired by Asia’s emerging megacities and based on photographs of Hong Kong, Ogura’s work depicts the striking contrast between a derelict Chinese town and looming, faceless skyscrapers.

Summer Screenprints Film Poster Exhibition @ Somerset House / until 23rd August 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Mon, Tue, Sat, Sun 10:00-18:00 (last entry 17:00)
Wed–Fri 11:00-20:00 (last entry 19:00)

From 10-23rd August open 10:00-18:00 and additionally from 18:30–21:00 for Film4 Summer Screen ticket holders

@ Somerset House, West Wing Galleries, Strand, London WC2R 1LA

Free entry

www.printclublondon.com/summer-screenprints-film-poster-exhibition
www.somersethouse.org.uk/whats-on/summer-screen-prints

Somerset House and Print Club London are collaborating on the fifth edition of the Summer Screen Prints exhibition, which brings limited-edition film prints to Somerset House throughout August. 🎬📽🎞

This year’s display will be the most extensive to date, with 20 original, screen-printed film poster artworks inspired by the Film4 Summer Screen programme.

Emerging, international artists respond to a moment, theme, character or quote from their favourite film in the season, including Joe Cruz, whose colourful and intimate work captures a pivotal moment in this year’s ‘Best Picture’ Oscar winner Moonlight, while Hattie Stewart‘s bold and striking reimagining of Cruel Intentions bares the malice of the cult film’s protagonist.

This free exhibition, open each day across the season, will enable you to buy the original, affordable works at Somerset House and on the Print Club London website for £60. With effortless acess to the exhibition from the Edmond J. Safra Fountain Court, film-goers will be able to enjoy special late openings ahead of each film screening.

Thursday 10th August – Premiere: An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power
Friday 11th August – Victoria
Saturday 12th August – Donnie Darko + The Omen
Sunday 13th August – The Philadelphia Story
Monday 14th August – Moonlight
Tuesday 15th August – All The President’s Men
Wednesday 16th August – Premiere: The Square
Thursday 17th August – Bhaji on the Beach
Friday 18th August – In Bruges
Saturday 19th August – Jaws + Deliverance
Sunday 20th August – My Neighbour Totoro
Monday 21st August – Cruel Intentions
Tuesday 22nd August – Blow-up
Wednesday 23rd August – Premiere: Patti Cake$

London Korean Festival @ Kensington Olympia / Saturday 8th July 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 11am-5:30pm

@ Kensington Olympia, Hammersmith Road, London W14 8UX

Free entry

www.london.korean-culture.org

Bringing the best of Korean art, cuisine, martial arts and drumming from TAGO to the UK. There are loads of attractions for families at the free day event, full of the sights, sounds and scents of Korean culture. 🇰🇷

There is an opportunity for would-be UK K-pop stars to compete in the K-Pop World Festival, with UK Regionals taking place at 2pm during the London Korean Festival.

Bojan Šarčević invagination @ Modern Art / until 14th January 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Sat 11am-6pm

@ Modern Art, 4-8 Helmet Row, London EC1V 3QJ

Free entry

www.modernart.net

Third solo exhibition with Modern Art. Šarčević’s work was the subject of survey exhibitions at Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein, Vaduz, Liechtenstein, and Institut d’Art Contemporain, Villeurbanne, France (2012).

Bojan Šarčević was born in Belgrade in 1974. He studied at L’Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris, France, graduating in 1997, and undertook postgraduate study at Rijksakademie, Amsterdam, Netherlands, from 1999 to 2000. He lives and works in Berlin and Paris.

Anselm Kiefer: Walhalla @ White Cube / until 12th February 2017 ⬜️

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Tuesday-Saturday 10am-6pm
Sunday 12pm-6pm

@ White Cube, Bermondsey, 144 – 152 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ

Free entry

www.whitecube.com

A new large-scale installation, sculpture and painting referring to the mythical place in Norse mythology, a paradise for those slain in battle, as well as to the Walhalla neo-classical monument, built by Ludwig I King of Bavaria in 1842 to honour heroic figures in German history.

Throughout his career, Kiefer has interwoven themes of history, politics and landscape into his work, revisiting imagery and symbolism through different forms and media. His work conflates and connects themes, resonating with the idea of history as one continuous cycle. In the past, for example, Kiefer has employed the symbolism of Norse mythology alongside the forms of National Socialist architecture, and for this exhibition he uses this as a basis for dramatic new paintings and sculpture that deal simultaneously with notions of creation and destruction, life and death.

The exhibition focuses on the major new installation Walhalla in the central corridor space, from which the other works thematically depart. Featuring a long, narrow room lined with oxidised lead, rows of fold-up steel beds are set close together and draped with dark grey crumpled lead sheets and covers. At the far end of the room, a black and white photograph mounted on lead depicts a lone figure walking away into a bleak, wintery landscape. The whole installation is dark, sombre and sparsely lit by a series of bare light bulbs, suggesting an institutional dormitory, military sleeping quarters or battlefield hospital. This sense of morbid claustrophobia is countered nonetheless by the offer of rest, of a break in the journey; a place perhaps of transformation.

In his new paintings, Kiefer employs a range of media – oil, acrylic, emulsion, shellac and clay – to emphasise the space of painting as a threshold into a mythic, imaginative realm. Here, a series of high towers are set amid desolate landscapes, their stacked forms exploding and dissolving into clouds of deep black or caustic blue smoke. A familiar motif in the artist’s work, the towers are based on his own sculptures made from rough concrete casts of shipping containers, including the brutalist-style towers of Jericho made for the set of In the Beginning staged at Opéra Bastille in Paris in 2009. In one such painting, Kiefer depicts the towers up-close, as if the viewer has found themselves in the ruins of some ancient city. In another work, which consists of three panels, flights of steps leading up to each tower reference the neo-classical, imposing architecture of Walhalla. Here, however, rather than the symbolic bastion of power that Walhalla aims to evoke, they are flat and two-dimensional, overlaid and set at impossible angles under the expanse of a meridian blue sky. In other pictures, which echo the landscapes of Van Gogh, the paintings are divided by a rough track, receding as far as the eye can see and often encrusted with layers of paint and deposited with a bitumen-like matter.

Several new vitrines, in different scales, continue these themes, through assemblages of soiled bleached clothes, stones, stacks of institutional metal beds, bicycles or small trees set upon squared off, cut-out sections of earth. Sealed off and displayed, these objects appear like fossils or unearthed artefacts entombed in glass and lead cases.

In the ‘9 x 9 x 9’ gallery, a dramatic, rusted metal spiral staircase disappears into the ceiling. Along its handrails hang curling strips of film reel, mounted onto lead, and soiled, robe-like dresses on wire coat hangers. In Norse mythology, Valhalla is linked to the Valkyries; women who decided who would live and who would die in battle. After making this choice, the Valkyries accompanied the dead to Valhalla, the hall of the slain in the afterlife ruled over by the god Odin. Entitled Sursum corda, this sculpture relates to the moment when the Valkyries arrive at Valhalla, their robes periodically discarded along the climb, suggesting loss and the trace of bodies that are no longer there.

Weekend Open @ Design Museum / until Sunday 27th November 2016 (then open for good!)

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Saturday 10:00-20:00
Sunday 10:00-18:00

@ The Design Museum, 224-238 Kensington High Street, London W8 6AG

www.designmuseum.org

Join the Design Museum as it reopens its doors in a stunning new home in Kensington, west London. Featuring free workshops, installations, talks and performances for all ages.

Be the first to see the opening exhibitions – Beazley Designs of the Year and Fear and Love: Reactions to a Complex World exhibitions.

Beazley Designs of the Year £10 booking online recommended this weekend!
Now in its ninth year, Beazley Designs of the Year celebrates design that promotes or delivers change, enables access, extends design practice or captures the spirit of the year. Someday the other museums will be showing this stuff.

Fear and Love £14 booking online recommended this weekend!
Reactions to a Complex World presents eleven new installations by some of the most innovative and thought-provoking designers and architects working today.

Rachel Maclean: Wot U :-) About? @ Tate Britain / from Tuesday 15th November until 2nd April 2017 ?

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10:00–18:00 every day

@ Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1P 4RG

Free entry!

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/rachel-maclean-wot-u-about

Rachel Maclean is a Glasgow-based multi-media artist who creates artificial visions using green-screen technology. Within her fantastical settings Maclean parodies fairy tales, children’s television programmes, beauty product advertising, internet videos, and pop culture playing all the extravagantly costumed characters herself. At once seductive and nightmarish, glossy and grotesque, her films destabilise power dynamics and consumer desires.

Curated by Elsa Coustou, Assistant Curator, Contemporary British Art. Maclean’s new film work, It’s What’s Inside That Counts (2016), has been commissioned by HOME, Manchester. The film has been created in partnership with HOME, Manchester, the University of Salford Art Collection, Artpace San Antonio, Zabludowicz Collection, Tate, Frieze Film and Channel 4 Random Acts. The exhibition has been created in partnership with HOME, Manchester.

William Kentridge: Thick Time @ Whitechapel Gallery / until 15th January 2017 ???

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Sun 11am–6pm (closed Mondays)

@ Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High Street, London E1 7QX

Tickets: £11.95 book online

www.whitechapelgallery.org/exhibitions/william-kentridge

South African artist William Kentridge (b.1955, Johannesburg) is renowned for his animated expressionist drawings and films exploring time, the history of colonialism and the aspirations and failures of revolutionary politics.

In this major exhibition of six large-scale installations by the artist, music and drama are ruptured by revolution, exile and scientific advancement.

Highlights include the film work Second-hand Reading (2013), installation O Sentimental Machine (2015) and The Refusal of Time (2012), an immersive work created with composer Philip Miller, projection designer Catherine Meyburgh, choreographer Dada Masilo, scientist Peter Galison and collaborators from around the world.

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