Tag: modern art

Block Universe @ various venues / from 29th May to 4th June 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: various

@ Various venues including the Royal Academy of Arts and Somerset House, as well as unique locations across the capital

Tickets: various book online

www.blockuniverse.co.uk

Block Universe, London’s international performance art festival, is back for the third year running, from 29 May to 4 June 2017, with a programme of newly commissioned performances, UK premieres, talks and workshops.

Week long festival presenting work by some of the most exciting UK-based and international artists working in performance art today:
Eglė Budvytytė
Işıl Eğrikavuk
Liz Magic Laser
Nicole Bachmann
Rory Pilgrim
Stina Nyberg
Will Rawls
Young In Hong
Zadie Xa
Collaboration between Kim Coleman, Zoë Poluch and Cara Tolmie

In post-Brexit Britain, this year’s festival theme will explore ideas surrounding political bodies, both personal and public, addressing identity politics and notions of nationhood set against a changing socio-political landscape. Looking at networked communities and the power of collective voices, Block Universe will champion work that questions the status quo in divisive times.

With four UK premieres and five site-specific commissions in noteworthy settings across central London, the works include: choreography modelled on the Gwangju uprising taking place in the public square of the Royal Academy of Arts courtyard by Young In Hong; Stina Nyberg’s choreographic work questioning Swedish physical ideals from the 1920s through a visually described performance; Rory Pilgrim’s collaboration with a youth group exploring sci-fi robotic support systems of care set in a Quaker Hall; and Isil Egrikavuk’s performative dinner exploring parallels between Pluto’s demotion from our solar system with the UK’s exit from the EU, amongst others.

Listings on Facebook.

Richard Tuttle: The Critical Edge @ Pace Gallery / until 13 May 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tues-Sat 10-6

@ Pace Gallery, 6 Burlington Gardens, London W1S 3ET

Free entry

www.pacegallery.com/exhibitions/12860/the-critical-edge

An exhibition of recent works in fabric by Richard Tuttle. First presented at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, in 2016, the exhibition follows two other major exhibitions of Tuttle’s work. In 2014, The Whitechapel Gallery surveyed the artist’s career from the 1960s to today and Tate Modern commissioned Tuttle’s largest textile sculpture to date for its iconic Turbine Hall.

Richard Tuttle (b. 1941, Rahway, New Jersey) is one of the most significant artists working today. Since the mid-1960s, he has created an extraordinarily varied body of work that eludes historical or stylistic categorization. Tuttle’s work exists in the space between painting, sculpture, poetry, assemblage, and drawing. He draws beauty out of humble materials, reflecting the fragility of the world in his poetic works. Without a specific reference point, his investigations of line, volume, color, texture, shape, and form are imbued with a sense of spirituality and informed by a deep intellectual curiosity. Language, spatial relationship, and scale are also central concerns for the artist, who maintains an acute awareness for the viewer’s aesthetic experience. Tuttle was the Artist in Residence at the Getty Research Institute from September 2012–June 2013. The artist lives and works in Mount Desert, Maine; Abiquiu, New Mexico and New York City.

Ashley Bickerton: Ornamental Hysteria @ Newport Street Gallery / until 20th August 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Tuesday – Sunday 10am – 6pm
Closed on Mondays

@ Newport Street Gallery, Newport Street, London SE11 6AJ

Free entry

www.newportstreetgallery.com/exhibitions/ashley-bickerton

Spanning more than three decades of Bickerton’s career and features 51 works, including a significant display of new and previously unexhibited pieces. It is the artist’s first UK show since 2009 and runs throughout all six spaces at Newport Street Gallery.

Bickerton moved to New York in 1982 and after working as a painting assistant to Jack Goldstein, he emerged as a key figure on the newly exploding East Village art scene. Within the context of the culture of commodification sweeping America he rose to prominence as part of an amorphous movement that was branded ‘Neo-Geometric Conceptualism’. Alongside artists such as Haim Steinbach and Jeff Koons, Bickerton endeavoured to reframe the practice of art production in response to the new, seductive mechanisms of desire at work in society.

Bickerton abandoned New York in 1993, eventually settling in Bali, where he still lives and works. Whilst a number of his themes prevailed, the materiality of his work shifted dramatically after this self-imposed exile from the urban environment.

Both in materiality and content, Bickerton’s work resists categorisation. On the diversity of his mediums – photocollage, appropriated image, digital image, paint and sculpture – he states: “Painting is far too cartoony and lacks the backbone of factuality; photography is too clinical and incapable of loony launches into the ether; and sculpture can be just downright presumptuous. […] Only in their combination do I find comfort.”

Bickerton’s conceptual commitment to intersectionality extends to his subject matter; his audacious and technically complex assemblages are predicated on themes of opposition and duality, for example representation and reality, creativity and commodity, nature and artifice, idyll and apocalypse. This is evident in his earlier work on display in gallery 1, which offers a sardonic critique of contemporary consumer culture and the commodification of the ‘art object’ via steel and aluminium wall-mounted ‘Culturescapes’ from the ‘Logo’ and ‘Non-Word Word’ series. Galleries 3 and 4 are dominated by Bickerton’s ‘Sea’ and ‘Landscapes’ – overblown and incongruous, they contain ephemera from the anthroposphere in the simulated shells of transportation devices. In part, these “truly contemporary” landscapes might be read as a dystopian view of the devastating impact of man on the ecosphere.

Throughout his career, Bickerton has challenged the relevancy of traditional art-historical tropes. His ‘self-portraits’ similarly parody the mythological figure of ‘the artist’, who is represented in the guise of the brands he chooses to endorse in Tormented Self-Portrait: Susie at Arles (25 Years) (2014) and as a five-bodied, technicoloured serpent in the monumental 5 Snake Heads (2009), on display in Newport Street’s double-height gallery 2.

Bickerton’s practice evolved in the late 90s to incorporate digital image and photography. In portraits such as Smiling Woman (2009), models (often family members and friends) are heavily made-up and photographed, then distorted in Photoshop before the image is printed on canvas and re-painted. These paintings are amongst Bickerton’s most overtly satirical, presenting lurid, constructed visions of life on a generic Pacific / Caribbean island.

Bouchra Khalili @ Lisson Gallery / until 18th March 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Monday–Friday, 10am–6pm
Saturday, 11am–5pm

@ Lisson Gallery, 67 Lisson Street, London NW1 5DA

Free entry

www.lissongallery.com/exhibitions/bouchra-khalili

First major solo exhibition in the United Kingdom by Moroccan-French artist Bouchra Khalili. Based between Berlin, Oslo and Paris, Khalili’s work explores the broad topics of migration and displacement through the mediums of film, video, installation, photography and prints. Largely inspired by the idea of journeys, both literally and conceptually, Khalili’s exhibition at Lisson Gallery lays bare the socially constructed nature of borders and challenges our fixed ideas of identity and nationhood.

Nowhere do the concepts of movement, identity and borders align more poignantly than in Khalili’s multi-channel video installation The Mapping Journey Project (2008–11). Aiming to draw an alternative practice of map-making, the work consists of eight films that focus the audience’s gaze on the tortuous and complex journeys taken by individuals forced to cross borders illegally. These journeys are literally traced onto a large map seen on screen, while the narrators recount the journey factually, vividly filling in the experiential details of their quests. In an essay for MoMA, New York, where the work was recently exhibited, Quinn Latimer notes that “the dark, pen-inked lines of [the migrants’] trajectories create strange and distinct constellations, fluid forms of statelessness that are posited against and over the more familiar coloured shapes and lines they cross – that patchwork of nation-states (colonial and other) that we have all learned to recognise like some international language of signs of the hegemonic world order”.

The abstract traces created in The Mapping Journey Project are realised further in Khalili’s The Constellation Series (2011). Composed of eight silkscreen prints, each of the Constellations translates the voyages recounted in the films into the form of star constellations similar to those that have been used in astronomy for centuries. Stripped of their borders and resisting containment, these journeys become fluid records of travels through space and time.

The final work in the exhibition, Foreign Office (2015), examines ideas of internationalism and solidarity. It is made up of a film, a series of photographs and a print. The work focuses on the city of Algiers and its position as an active site of revolution and anti-colonial movements between 1962-1972, with groups including the African National Congress (ANC) and Black Panthers having headquarters there during this period. Produced with the support of the Sam Art Prize, the film shows two young Algerians ‘re-writing’ history through images, language and oral narratives, while the accompanying series of photographs document the ghostly places that were home to these political movements, at once echoing the disappearance of utopia and its persistence to haunt the present-time.

Conceptual Art in Britain 1964-79 @ Tate Britain / until 29th August 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10am–6pm

@ Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1P 4RG

Tickets: £10.50 book online

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/conceptual-art-britain-1964-1979

In the 1960s artists began to abandon traditional approaches and made ideas the essence of their work. This fascinating exhibition explores this pivotal period in British history.

It gathers together artists who took art beyond its traditional boundaries to suggest new ways of engaging with the realities of the world beyond the studio, which ultimately led to a questioning of the function and social purpose of art.

The radical and controversial work both scrutinised and consistently took inspiration from the real world. Asking what art is, as well as what it might be for, inevitably led some artists to create work that was often politically engaged with themes and issues ranging from feminism to the Troubles in Northern Ireland.

Seen within the context of its time, spanning Harold Wilson’s first Labour government to the election of Margaret Thatcher, this show reveals conceptual art’s lasting legacy.

Artists featured within the show include, among others: Keith Arnatt, Art & Language, Conrad Atkinson, Victor Burgin, Michael Craig-Martin, Hamish Fulton, Margaret Harrison, Susan Hiller, John Hilliard, Mary Kelly, John Latham, Richard Long, Bruce McLean, David Tremlett and Stephen Willats.

Carsten Höller: Decision @ Hayward Gallery / until 6th September 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Mon noon–6pm
Tue, Wed, Sat, Sun 11am–7pm
Thu, Fri 11am–8pm (late night)

@ Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, Belvedere Road, London SE1 8XX

Tickets: around £15 book online

www.southbankcentre.co.uk

The exhibition, which sprawls across Hayward Gallery and erupts beyond its roof and walls, explores perception and decision making.

Confronting visitors with a series of choices, it features mirrors, disconcerting doubles and mysterious objects which together create an impression of a world where nothing is quite as it seems.

Born in Belgium to German parents, Höller trained as a scientist – gaining an advanced degree in agricultural entomology – before becoming an artist.

Over the past 20 years Höller has created experiential installations, participatory artworks and immersive environments.

These often feature disorientating architecture and perception-altering devices, which Holler refers to as ‘artificial limbs for parts of your body that you don’t even know you’ve lost’.

Believing that ‘people are often more powerful than artworks’, Holler sees his work as ‘incomplete’ without visitor interaction. Under Höller, Hayward Gallery is transformed into a platform – part laboratory, part playground – dedicated solely to human experience.

BP Spotlight: Tracey Emin and Francis Bacon @ Tate Britain / until June 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10am – 6pm

@ Tate Britain, Millbank London SW1P 4RG

Free

www.tate.org.uk

Tracey Emin’s installation My Bed 1998 returns to Tate Britain after it first came to public attention when shown in the 1999 Turner Prize exhibition.

It is displayed there alongside six of the artist’s recent figure drawings, as well as two oil paintings by Francis Bacon selected by Emin. Her installation, as Bacon’s paintings do, retains a strong sense of the lived presence and memory traces of past events.

By virtue of bringing the domestic into the public sphere, without directly representing specific events, My Bed is forcefully and compellingly suggestive of personal narratives.

Best known for making works that convey experiences and events from her own life by using a range of media, read Tate’s introduction to Tracey Emin to find out more about the artist in her own words.

John Gerrard: Farm @ Thomas Dane Gallery / until 21st March 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Fri 11-6pm, Sat 12-6pm

@ Thomas Dane Gallery, 3 & 11 Duke Street St James’s, London SW1Y 6BN

Free entry

www.thomasdanegallery.com

A second solo exhibition by Irish artist, John Gerrard (b. Dublin 1974) consisting of two new works. Gerrard is widely regarded as a pioneer of digital media. Deceptively looking like film or video, his works are simulations – virtual worlds, made using real-time computer graphics, a technology developed by the military and now used extensively in the gaming industry. Often exploring geographically isolated locations – be they the agrarian American Great Plains, remote reaches of the Gobi Desert, or sites of military exercises in Djibouti – the works frequently refer to structures of power and networks of energy that have coincided with the expansion of human endeavor in the past century. In Gerrard’s two new works, hyper-technology meets this sense of isolation again.

In early 2014, following his denial of access by Google Inc, Gerrard hired a helicopter and produced a detailed photographic survey of one the key physical sites of the internet – a Google data server building in Oklahoma, also known as a ‘data farm’. This survey was the starting point of his new work entitled Farm (Pryor Creek, Oklahoma), 2015. It features a simulated ‘twin’ of the squat building flanked by diesel generators and powerful cooling towers. The work extends Gerrard’s ‘Grow Finish Unit’ series, which focuses on architecturally similar, computer-controlled park production units in the Midwestern USA.

#JohnGerrard Farm still captivating visitors #Google #DataFarm #PryorCreek #Oaklahoma

A photo posted by Thomas Dane Gallery (@thomasdanegallery) on

Digital Revolution @ Barbican Art Gallery / until 14th September 2014

Digital Revolution at Barbican Art GalleryTIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
11:00-20:00
Thu:11:00-22:00

@ Barbican Art Gallery, Level 3, Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS

Tickets: £12.50 book online

www.barbican.org.uk

Digital Revolution is the most comprehensive presentation of digital creativity ever to be staged in the UK.

The immersive and interactive exhibition brings together for the first time a range of artists, filmmakers, architects, designers, musicians and game developers, all pushing the boundaries of their fields using digital media. It also looks at the dynamic developments in the areas of creative coding and DIY culture and the exciting creative possibilities offered by augmented reality, artificial intelligence, wearable technologies and 3-D printing.

Contribute to new commissions including Google’s DevArt, an installation by global music artist and entrepreneur will.i.am and artist Yuri Suzuki and works by artists Umbrellium, Universal Everything, Seeper and Susan Kare (Mac Paint designer). Experience Oscar-winning visual effects behind Christopher Nolan’s Inception and Alfonso Cuarón’s Gravity, or go back in time to play classic videogames like Pacman and Space Invaders.

© 2017 InFormed London

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑