Tag: museums

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 53 at Natural History of the Year until 28 May 2018

Explore the world’s best nature photography, highlighting the incredible range of life on Earth. 🐍 🐻 🦒

The exhibition of 100 images records the beauty and drama of the natural world, from tiny insects to massive mammals.

This year’s competition attracted almost 50,000 entries from professionals and amateurs across 92 countries.

See winning images selected by a panel of judges for their creativity, originality and technical excellence.

www.nhm.ac.uk/visit/exhibitions/wildlife-photographer-of-the-year

Location:
The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD

Times:
10:00am – 5:50pm

Price:
£12.50 book online

Botanical Portraits by Kate Friend at Garden Museum until 18 March 2018

A photographic study of English plants. British photographer Kate Friend spent the spring and summer of 2017 touring a selection of England’s greatest gardens, gathering the subjects of her photographic study which makes up Botanical Portraits. 🌱 🌿 🍃

To select some of the best specimens of the season she worked with Head Gardeners at Chelsea Physic Garden, Great Dixter, Houghton Hall and Fern Verrow. For each photograph, a stem was isolated from its growing environment and photographed in a studio setting, inviting the viewer to focus on form and colour. With a nod both to the Japanese rikka (standing flowers) tradition and to Gertrude Jekyll’s still life photography of the 19th century, the aesthetic focusses as much on what is left out as on the little that is allowed in. Vases and vessels are of central importance to the final result, seen here are ceramics from Rachel Lucas-Craig, Laura Huston and Karen Downing.

Kate Friend’s selection criterion for the chosen plants was that they were native to England. On pursuing this path, she discovered that this was not a straightforward premise. Exploration, trade, colonialism and early globalisation have resulted in England’s rich and diverse international plant community. The eclectic nature of the final selection reflects England’s multicultural botanical heritage.

Visitors can see the ten photographs which make up ‘Botanical Portraits’, alongside a narrative wall, a separate display showing ‘behind the scenes’ photographs and location shots, both at the museum.

www.gardenmuseum.org.uk/exhibitions/coming-soon-botanical-portraits-kate-friend

Location:
Garden Museum, Lambeth Palace Road, Lambeth, London SE1 7LB

Times:
Sunday – Friday 10:30am 5pm
Saturday 10:30am – 4pm
Closed the first Monday of the month

Price:
£10 adult or less with concessions

Permanent exhibition at Royal Air Force Museum

A unique experience to learn the story of the people who moulded the world of aviation from the daredevil early aviators to wartime heroes and the thousands of ordinary Service men and women who have served in the RAF and whose contribution has shaped the world that we live in today. ✈️ 🛩

With a world-class collection and display of aircraft, integrated with special exhibitions, films, interactives, artwork, engines, missiles, photographs, medals and uniforms and research and education facilities, the Museum takes an innovative approach to telling these stories whilst keeping with tradition.

With over 85 aircraft on site, nowhere else in London enables you to get close to so many historic and groundbreaking aircraft without paying an entrance.

In addition to this the Museum offers a full calendar of free events and exhibitions that not only bring the world beating collection to life but also educate whilst entertaining visitors.

www.rafmuseum.org.uk/london

Location:
RAF Museum London, Grahame, Park Way, London NW9 5LL

Times:
10am – 5pm

Price:
Free entry

The Currency of Communism at British Museum until 18 March 2018

This display looks at the changing roles of currency and exchange in communist states in the century since the 1917 Russian Revolution. 🤑 🤑 🤑

Communism proposes that money has no role in a utopian society. To date though, no communist state has successfully removed money from its economy. In the last 100 years, communism has existed in various forms in dozens of states all around in the world. From eastern Europe to Southeast Asia, this display examines the role of money in communist states, as well as the iconography and imagery associated with it.

Within communist economies, concepts of value and wealth are eroded and distorted, and the national currency becomes just one of various means of exchange. The display features examples of how the value of money has been reduced by communist states. East German coins made from aluminium demonstrate how communist currency was deliberately made to feel light and cheap. Adverts for savings banks from the USSR show how consumer benefits were left out of advertising in favour of information explaining how savings benefit the state.

With the reduced role of currency, communist states introduced different reward systems, starting in Russia in the 1930s. Stalin said people were to be measured ‘by their heroic feats’. A worker who exceeded their factory quota may receive the Order of the Badge of Honour, and a mother who raised nine children would receive the Order of Maternal Glory, First Class. These awards came with monetary bonuses, and allowed recipients access to a better quality of life due to the perks that came with them.

The collapse of the Soviet Union and the transition to democracy in the early 1990s had a huge effect on former communist states. With borders and economies suddenly open after many years, new ideas and imagery soon began to circulate, along with new national currencies. Today there are only four states with planned economies – China, Laos, Cuba and Vietnam. Trading relations between them and capitalist countries have become normalised, but concepts of currency and political ideology continue to evolve.

www.britishmuseum.org/whats_on/exhibitions/the_currency_of_communism

Location:
British Museum, Great Russell Street, London WC1B 3DG

Times:
10am – 5:30pm (Friday until 8:30pm)

Price:
Free entry

Power UP at Science Museum / until Tuesday 31 October 2017

Back by popular demand for a second year. Filling the museum to the brim with retro games and 180 consoles to give everyone the chance to Power UP and game on. 🎮 👾

This hands-on, fully interactive gaming event will feature the best video games and consoles from the past four decades. From Pong to Pac-Man and Minecraft to Mario, there’s something for everyone—whether you’re a retro games fan, a serious gamer or just to get competitive.

Play against friends and family with multiplayer showdowns, relive your childhood favourites and test out some of the latest virtual reality experiences at this ultimate gaming extravaganza.

www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/see-and-do/power-up

Times:
Open daily 10.00–18.00
School holidays 10.00–19.00

Location:
Science Museum, Exhibition Road, South Kensington, London SW7 2DD

Tickets:
From £8 for a session, book online

Robots @ Science Museum / 3rd September 2017 ???

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10:00 – 18:00 (until 22:00 on Fridays)

@ Science Museum, Exhibition Road, South Kensington, London, SW7 2DD

Tickets: £15 adults book online

www.sciencemuseum.org.uk

From the dawn of mechanised human forms to cutting-edge technology fresh from the lab, Robots reveals the astonishing 500-year quest to make machines human.

Focusing on why they exist rather than on how they work, our blockbuster exhibition explores the ways robots mirror humanity and the insights they offer into our ambitions, desires and position in a rapidly changing world.

Robots takes you on an incredible journey spanning five centuries, illustrated with robotic artefacts from around the globe from a 16th century mechanised monk to some of film’s most iconic robotic creations and the very latest humanoids.

Disobedient Objects @ Victoria and Albert Museum / until 1st February 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Daily 10:00–17:30
Friday 10:00–21:30

@ Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A), The Porter Gallery, Cromwell Road, London SW7 2RL

Free entry

www.vam.ac.uk

From a Suffragette tea service to protest robots, this exhibition is the first to examine the powerful role of objects in movements for social change.

It demonstrates how political activism drives a wealth of design ingenuity and collective creativity that defy standard definitions of art and design.

Disobedient Objects focuses on the period from the late 1970s to now, a time that has brought new technologies and political challenges.

On display are arts of rebellion from around the world that illuminate the role of making in grassroots movements for social change: finely woven banners; defaced currency; changing designs for barricades and blockades; political video games; an inflatable general assembly to facilitate consensus decision-making; experimental activist-bicycles; and textiles bearing witness to political murders.

Universal Everything and You @ Science Museum / until 7th Feb 2014

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10:00-18:00

@ Science Museum, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2DD

www.sciencemuseum.org.uk

An ambitious project by the UK based art and design collective sees a large audio visual installation take over the new Media Space gallery.

Made up of two parts – 1000 Hands and Presence – Universal Everything’s interactive digital installation is described as a ‘playful and experimental invention in sounds, drawing and moving image’.

1000 Hands is created by contributions from the public through a smartphone app. In the gallery space it takes the form of a circular projection onto multiple screens, with each one showing an individual artwork generated by app users.

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