Tag: science

BLOOD: Life Uncut @ Science Gallery London / until 1st November 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: various

@ Boland House, St Thomas Street, London SE1 9RT

Free entry

london.sciencegallery.com/blood/london/exhibition-overview

An exhibition and event series that demonstrates the captivating power of blood to expose, shock and bring people together. 🅰️🅱️🅾️🆎

The season launches on 27 July with a series of events and installations at various sites around London Bridge and concludes with an exhibition – on view from 12 October – 1 November – at the Copeland Gallery in Peckham, alongside a programme of performances and workshops.

The season will feature a range of international artists including Jordan Eagles, Katharine Dowson, Live Art Development Agency, Chris Milk and poet Sabrina Mahfouz. New collaborations between artists and scientists tackle issues which are often invisible, offering fresh perspectives on menstruation, Ebola, sickle cell anaemia, blood donation, forensics and blood typing.

Robots @ Science Museum / 3rd September 2017 ???

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10:00 – 18:00 (until 22:00 on Fridays)

@ Science Museum, Exhibition Road, South Kensington, London, SW7 2DD

Tickets: £15 adults book online

www.sciencemuseum.org.uk

From the dawn of mechanised human forms to cutting-edge technology fresh from the lab, Robots reveals the astonishing 500-year quest to make machines human.

Focusing on why they exist rather than on how they work, our blockbuster exhibition explores the ways robots mirror humanity and the insights they offer into our ambitions, desires and position in a rapidly changing world.

Robots takes you on an incredible journey spanning five centuries, illustrated with robotic artefacts from around the globe from a 16th century mechanised monk to some of film’s most iconic robotic creations and the very latest humanoids.

Friday Late: Synthetic Aesthetics @ Victoria and Albert Museum / Friday 25th April 2014

Friday Late - Synthetic Aesthetics at Victoria and Albert MuseumTIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 18:30–22:00

@ Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A), Cromwell Road, South Kensington, London SW7 2RL

Free entry

www.vam.ac.uk

Friday Late turns V&A into a living laboratory, bringing science and design together for one night of events, workshops and installations, each exploring our biological future.

The evening will feature the book launch of Synthetic Aesthetics: Investigating Synthetic Biology’s Designs on Nature (MIT Press). The book marks an important point in the development of the emerging discipline of synthetic biology, sitting at the intersection between design and science. The book is a result of research funded by the UK’s Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and the National Science Foundation in the US.

Can we design life itself? The emerging field of synthetic biology crosses the boundary between science and design to manipulate the stuff of life. These new designers use life as a programmable material, creating new organisms with radical applications from materials to machines.

All events are free and places are first come first served.

Collider @ Science Museum / until 5th May 2014

Collider at Science MuseumTIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10:00-18:00

@ Science Museum, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2DD

Tickets: £10 book online

www.sciencemuseum.org.uk

A journey inside the largest scientific experiment ever constructed. Buried deep under the border between Switzerland and France, CERN’s Large Hadron Collider is the work of 10,000 men and women from across the globe, united in their quest to uncover the fundamental building blocks of our universe.

This immersive exhibition blends theatre, video and sound art with real artefacts from CERN, recreating a visit to the famous particle physics laboratory. We’ll take you behind the scenes to witness the uncovering of the Higgs boson, explore the 27-km collider and its cathedral-sized detector caverns, and discover how studying the subatomic world can point the way to a fuller understanding of our universe.

See history being made. Meet engineers who build the impossible. Walk the tunnels of CERN. Stand in the heart of a collision. Witness a moment of discovery. Step inside the world’s greatest experiment.

Lawrence Krauss on Cosmic Connections @ Conway Hall / Sunday 16th October 2011

TIME AND PLACE

Doors: 11.15 am – 12.45pm

@ Conway Hall, 25 Red Lion Square, WC1

“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded. And, the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics: You are all stardust.”
–  Lawrence Krauss

Tickets £12.50

The School of Life

Professor of Earth and Space Exploration, Lawrence Krauss, isn’t immune to small irritations of daily living. However, he can see the bigger picture.

He’ll take to the pulpit to show how each of us is connected to the cosmos in ways we’d never imagine. From the stardust we’re made of, to the atoms we breathe, to the curving of space time that governs the way we make our way through traffic jams, to time travel itself.

Join for a surprising and thought-provoking lesson on what looking to the stars can teach us about ourselves.

Dr Lawrence Krauss is a prolific and popular writer and an indefatigable fighter for science and critical thinking. At Arizona State University, he is Foundation Professor in the School of Earth and Space Exploration and Physics Departments, Associate Director of the Beyond Center, and Co-Director of the Cosmology Initiative. He is also Director of the exciting new Origins Initiative, which explores questions ranging from the origin of the Universe to the origins of human culture and cognition. He has studied and explained matters from the microscopic to astronomical. In performing with the Cleveland Orchestra, judging at the Sundance Film Festival, and his Grammy nominated notes for Telarc Records, Krauss has also bridged the chasm between science and popular culture.

We serve fresh events daily. Say hello on Twitter www.twitter.com/informedlondon

© 2017 InFormed London

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑