Tag: shows in London (page 1 of 10)

Flabbergast Theatre: Boris and Sergey’s Astonishing Freakatorium @ Wiltons Music Hall / 9th – 13th May 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
9th – 10th 7:30pm
11th – 13th 9pm

@ Wilton’s Music Hall, Graces Alley, London E1 8JB

Tickets: from £10.50 book online (20% off when you book to see Tatterdemalion on the same night)

www.flabbergasttheatre.co.uk
www.wiltons.org.uk/whatson/298-boris-sergey-s-astonishing-freakatorium

Created by War Horse, Blind Summit and Handspring puppeteer, Henry Maynard and his highly skilled team of expert puppeteers who have been working together in sweaty and physically compromising conditions since 2010, Boris and Sergey’s Astonishing Freakatorium is an improvised crossover cabaret featuring tabletop puppetry and character comedy for discerningly twisted adult audiences!

Following sell out runs at the Edinburgh and Adelaide Fringes and gathering three awards, 10 five star reviews (and counting), puppetry’s Balkan bad boys Boris & Sergey; simply the greatest vaudevillian double act ever conceived for the small stage, are back in London with freak show cabaret like no other.

Starring a variety of puppet characters, Boris & Sergey follow the tragic story of Pierre le Petit Tête Gustav and his wildly deranged tap dancing companion Juan Tamino. Audiences must hold on to their hats as they delve into a titillation filled world of the macabre. Boris & Sergey recreate traditional scenes of geeking, feats of incredible fortitude, endeavours of unimaginable physical endurance with formidable artistry, all whilst beguiling with their roughish wit and erudite jocularity.

Festival Embassy @ House of St Barnabas / Saturday 25th March 2017 🎉🔊

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: noon till late!

@ The House of St Barnabas, 1 Greek St, London W1D 4NQ

Tickets: from £15 book online

www.hosb.org.uk

The wonderous world of Bestival, with its spirit of discovery and adventure that inspires peace, love and dancing, is coming to Soho and you won’t want to miss it.

A taste of Bestival in the heart of London’s Soho will bring rising stars, intimate acoustic gigs, renowned and emerging DJs and much more, to the unique Grade I listed Georgian townhouse and secluded courtyard garden.

HoSB believe in paying it forward; for every ticket bought, one will be given to someone who would not be able to afford one, opening access to culture, live music with social inclusion at its heart.

Pay it forward tickets will be given to people affected by homelessness, who are part of the House’s Employment Academy, the Soho community, or are supported by one of the many charities they work with.

Carly Grace Sound Bath 12pm – 1pm
Start the day by loving you. Join Carly for her drop-in Sound Bath to let go of all your worries and open into a deep space of peace.

Zoe’s Ghana Kitchen Brunch 1pm – 2:30pm
Brunch like a Ghanaian! For full details see below.

Tie Dye Workshop 3pm – 5pm
Join the team of crafters from The New Craft House in our garden for some tie dye magic!

Mother’s Day Card Making 4pm – 6pm
Drop in and show your mum some love by making her an extra-special card for mother’s day! Expect lots of colour and glitter!

The Radical Eye: Modernist Photography from the Sir Elton John Collection @ Tate Modern / until 21st May 2017 📷

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Monday to Sunday 10.00–18.00
Friday to Saturday 10.00–22.00

@ Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: £15 book online

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/radical-eye-modernist-photography-sir-elton-john-collection

This is a once-in-a-lifetime chance to see one of the world’s greatest private collections of photography, drawn from the classic modernist period of the 1920s–50s. An incredible group of Man Ray portraits are exhibited together for the first time, having been brought together by Sir Elton John over the past twenty-five years, including portraits of Matisse, Picasso, and Breton.

With over 70 artists and nearly 150 rare vintage prints on show from seminal figures including Brassai, Imogen Cunningham, André Kertész, Dorothea Lange, Tina Modotti, and Aleksandr Rodchenko, this is a chance to take a peek inside Elton John’s home and delight in seeing such masterpieces of photography.

Eduardo Paolozzi @ Whitechapel Gallery / until 14th May 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Sun, 11am-6pm (Thu until 9pm)

@ Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High Street, London E1 7QX

Tickets: £11.95 book online

www.whitechapelgallery.org/exhibitions/eduardo-paolozzi

Exhibition about one of the most innovative and irreverent artists of the 20th century. Considered the ‘godfather of Pop Art’, his collages, sculptures and prints challenged artistic convention, from the 1950s through to the Swinging Sixties and advent of ‘Cool Britannia’ in the 1990s.

This major Eduardo Paolozzi retrospective spans five decades and features over 250 works; from the artist’s post-War bronzes, revolutionary screen-prints and collages, to his bold textiles and fashion designs.

Alongside Paolozzi’s early brutalist concrete sculptures, highlights include material from his groundbreaking performance lecture Bunk! (1952), his large-scale Whitworth Tapestry (1967) and the iconic sculpture Diana as an Engine (1963).

Jo Brocklehurst: Nobodies and Somebodies @ House of Illustration / until 14th May 2017 ✏️

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Sun, 10am-6pm

@ 2 Granary Square, King’s Cross, N1C 4BH

Tickets: £7.50 book online

www.houseofillustration.org.uk/whats-on/current-future-events/jo-brocklehurst-nobodies-and-somebodies

Drawing live in fetish clubs, punk squats and on the performance scene of 1970-90s London, Berlin and New York, Jo Brocklehurst’s artwork is a unique record of subculture.

Her figurative paintings from fetish clubs document experiments with sex, androgyny and couture that later inspired the mainstream fashion collections of Jean Paul Gaultier, while her best-known portraits from the 1980s offer a raw, beautiful and female perspective on punk.

Co-curated by her model and muse Isabelle Bricknall, the exhibition also features her drawings of Berlin’s 1990s performing arts scene for the Berliner Zeitung newspaper, alongside clubland-inspired interpretations of Alice Through the Looking Glass.

Amy Winehouse @ Jewish Museum London / from 16th March until 24th September 2017 💁

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Daily from 10am – 5pm
Friday: 10am – 2pm

@ Jewish Museum London, 129-131 Albert Street, Camden Town, London NW1 7NB

Tickets: from £6.50 book online

www.jewishmuseum.org.uk/amy

Discover the woman behind the music and beyond the hype in this intimate and moving exhibition about a much loved sister.

Get to know the real Amy Winehouse through her personal belongings, from family photographs to fashion. Items on display reflect Amy’s love for her family, London and more.

Originally staged at the museum in 2013 and returning following an international tour, Amy Winehouse: Family Portrait was co-curated with Winehouse’s brother Alex and sister-in-law Riva.

The exhibition is accompanied by a new Amy-themed street art trail which leads to ‘Love Is A Losing Game’ by renowned street artist Pegasus in our Welcome Gallery.

The American Dream: Pop to the Present @ British Museum / until 18th June 2017 🇺🇸

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10am – 5.30pm (Fri until 8.30pm)

@ British Museum, Great Russell Street, London WC1B 3DG

Tickets: £17.50 book online

Trace the creative momentum of a superpower in this major new exhibition.

The past six decades have been among the most dynamic and turbulent in US history, from JFK’s assassination, Apollo 11 and Vietnam to the AIDS crisis, racism and gender politics. Responding to the changing times, American artists produced prints unprecedented in their scale and ambition.

Starting with the explosion of pop art in the 1960s, the exhibition includes works by the most celebrated American artists. From Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg to Ed Ruscha, Kara Walker and Julie Mehretu – all boldly experimented with printmaking. Experience this extraordinary history through their eyes.

Taking inspiration from the world around them – billboard advertising, global politics, Hollywood and household objects – American artists created highly original prints to rival their paintings and sculptures. Printmaking brought their work to a much wider and more diverse audience.

The sheer inventiveness and technical ingenuity of their prints reflects America’s power and influence during this period. Many of these works also address the deep divisions in society that continue to resonate with us today – there are as many American dreams as there are Americans.

This exhibition presents the Museum’s outstanding collection of modern and contemporary American prints for the first time. These will be shown with important works from museums and private collections around the world.

Sonia Boyce: We move in her way @ ICA / until 16th Apr 2017 💁

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tue-Sun 11am–11pm (Thu until 9pm)

@ Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA), The Mall, London SW1Y 5AH

£1 day membership, find out more

www.ica.art/whats-on/sonia-boyce-we-move-her-way

A new body of work created especially for the ICA. Involving the exploratory vocal and movement performances of Elaine Mitchener, Barbara Gamper and her dancers Eve Stainton, Ria Uttridge and Be van Vark, with an invited audience.

A multi-media installation has been generated from the documentation of their open-ended live performance. The title of the work suggests two possible readings: that ‘she’ dictates our movements; or that we obstruct ‘hers’, with both interpretations suggesting power is at play.

Boyce has a participatory art practice where she invites others to engage performatively with improvisation. In this process, she encourages contributors to exercise their own responses to the situations she enables, where she steps back from any directorial position to observe the activities and dynamics of exchange as they unfold. Once the performance is played out and documented, Boyce reshapes the material generated, in what she calls “recouping the remains”, to create the artwork as a multi-media installation.

We move in her way was created in this way as a performative laboratory, in which the audience and performers negotiated the ICA Theatre space around sculptural objects and their own bodies. Play and playfulness unfolded during the open-ended live performance, sparking a breakdown of assumed order between performers and audience. The dynamics of power-play shifted between the masked audience, the performers and the sculptural objects created as a means to facilitate touch and being together, whilst remaining distinct.

Richard Wilson: Stealing Space @ Annely Juda Fine Art / 25th March 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Monday–Friday 10:00–18:00
Saturday 11:00–17:00

@ Annely Juda Fine Art, 4th Floor, 23 Dering Street, London W1S 1AW

Free entry

www.annelyjudafineart.co.uk

The artist’s first at the gallery and his first solo show in London since unveiling his major site-specific work, Slipstream, at Heathrow Airport’s Terminal 2. The exhibition features four new works, two of which are in direct response to the gallery’s internal and external architecture.

Works in this exhibition dominate the gallery’s space and stand, in places, above the height of the architectural beams. In the main room, Wilson has created a sculpture of a slice of the negative space or “space between” the hallway and staircase leading to the gallery’s main entrance. Partial details of a doorway, steps or a bannister in negative form are visible on the sculpture which sits straight on the ground at a tilted angle, offering a reassessment of the perhaps completely unnoticed yet familiar surroundings the viewer has just encountered. Block of Dering, meanwhile, takes the façade of the gallery building at 23 Dering Street and reconfigures it into a near-cube. Even the gallery’s signage can be made out in this sculpture which presents the local architecture in an entirely new way.

In the second room, a sculpture delineates the “space between” an area of Wilson’s home in South East London whilst Blocka Flats takes a piece of household furniture reconfigured into a form reminiscent of an urban landscape on a micro scale, the very same landscape which Wilson refers to in other works on a 1:1 scale. Two preparatory sketches for each work hang near their sculptural counterparts, whilst in the final room, Wilson shows maquettes of past works and those not yet realised.

Richard Wilson is a world-renowned British artist whose architectural interventions have won him acclaim throughout his career. Wilson rose to prominence in 1987 when his installation, 20:50 – consisting of a room filled to waist height with reflective sump oil – was shown at Matt’s Gallery in London and purchased by The Saatchi Gallery. Wilson has gone on to create a series of predominantly site-specific works, most recently Slipstream (2014), which stands at an impressive 78 meters at Heathrow Airport’s Terminal 2. Wilson was appointed visiting research professor at the University of East London in 2004, elected as a member of the Royal Academy in 2006 and in 2008 was awarded an honorary doctorate at the University of Middlesex. He has created permanent and temporary works at prominent locations worldwide and his works have been shown at institutions such as The Serpentine Gallery, London; Saatchi Gallery, London; The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; National Gallery of Australia, Canberra and Museu d’Art Contemporani, Barcelona.

“I need that initial thing from the real world because I’ve always been concerned with the way you can alter someone’s perception, knock their view off kilter. And to do that I need to start with something we think we understand.”

Richard Mosse: Incoming @ Barbican – The Curve / until 23rd April 2017 📷

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
The Curve
Sat–Wed 11am–8pm
Thu–Fri 11am–9pm

@ Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS

Free entry

www.barbican.org.uk

Barbican Art Gallery has invited conceptual documentary photographer and Deutsche Börse Photography Prize winner Richard Mosse to create an immersive multi-channel video installation in the Curve. In collaboration with composer Ben Frost and cinematographer Trevor Tweeten, Mosse has been working with an advanced new thermographic weapons and border imaging technology that can see beyond 30km, registering a heat signature of relative temperature difference. Classed as part of advanced weapons systems under International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), Mosse has been using this export controlled camera against its intended purpose, to create an artwork about the refugee crisis unfolding in the Aegean Sea, off the coast of Libya, in Syria, the Sahara, the Persian Gulf, and other locations.

Mosse is renowned for work that challenges documentary photography. In his recent work The Enclave (2013) – a six-channel installation commissioned by the Irish Pavilion for the 2013 Venice Biennale – Mosse employed a now discontinued 16mm colour infrared film called Kodak Aerochrome that transformed the green landscape of the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo into vivid hues of pink to create a surreal dreamscape. Questioning the ways in which war photography is constructed, Mosse’s representation of the ongoing armed conflict in eastern Congo advocates a new way of looking.

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