Tag: shows in London (page 1 of 11)

Howard Hodgkin: Absent Friends @ National Portrait Gallery / until Sunday 18th June 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Sat – Wed, 10am – 6pm
Thu – Fri, 10am – 9pm

@ National Portrait Gallery, St Martin’s Place, London WC2H 0HE

Tickets: £10 book online

www.npg.org.uk/whatson/howard-hodgkin-absent-friends/home

This is the first exhibition of portraits by Howard Hodgkin (1932-2017), one of Britain’s greatest artists. Hodgkin’s paintings are characterised by rich colour, complex illusionistic space and sensuous brushwork. By emphasising these pictorial elements, his work frequently appears entirely abstract. However, over the course of 65 years, a principal concern of Hodgkin’s art has been to evoke a human presence.

The role of memory, the expression of emotion, and the exploration of relationships between people and places are all preoccupations. The exhibition explores Hodgkin’s development of a personal visual language of portraiture, which challenges traditional forms of representation.

Into the Unknown: A Journey through Science Fiction @ Barbican Art Gallery / until 1st September 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 11am – 8pm (Thu and Fri until 9pm)

@ Barbican Art Gallery, Level 3, Barbican Centre, Silk Street, London EC2Y 8DS

From £14.50 book online

www.barbican.org.uk/intotheunknown

The genre-defining exhibition of art, design, film and literature.

From the 19th century cabinet of curiosities, to the vastness of space. Through future cities, into the inner landscapes of human perception.

Uncover the mysterious lands of Jules Verne and Ray Harryhausen where Science Fiction narratives first took root. Venture on an odyssey into our solar system, with vintage artwork promoting Soviet visions of space alongside immersive work by Soda_Jerk. Visit a gallery of aliens, and stand alongside iconic spacesuits from a galaxy of blockbusters including Star Trek and Interstellar.

Imagine dystopian worlds with Margaret Atwood and 28 Days Later. Then, with nowhere left to explore but human consciousness, delve deep and experience the transformation and mutation of the body through the eyes of Jack Kirby and Ex Machina.

Curated by historian and writer Patrick Gyger, this festival-style exhibition consists of more than 800 works, many of which have never been seen in the UK before. Continuing across the Centre, it includes artwork from Isaac Julien, Larissa Sansour and Conrad Shawcross, and an installation from the creators of Black Mirror.

The Powerpuff Girls Emporium @ central London pop-up / until Saturday 3rd June 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 11am-5pm

@ 15 Bateman Street, Soho, London W1D 3AQ

Get Powerpuffed at the make-up and nail bar, visit the Super Cute and Super Fierce petting zoo, enter Professor Utonium’s lab and explore all things Powerpuff!

RSVP on Facebook.

Block Universe @ various venues / from 29th May to 4th June 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: various

@ Various venues including the Royal Academy of Arts and Somerset House, as well as unique locations across the capital

Tickets: various book online

www.blockuniverse.co.uk

Block Universe, London’s international performance art festival, is back for the third year running, from 29 May to 4 June 2017, with a programme of newly commissioned performances, UK premieres, talks and workshops.

Week long festival presenting work by some of the most exciting UK-based and international artists working in performance art today:
Eglė Budvytytė
Işıl Eğrikavuk
Liz Magic Laser
Nicole Bachmann
Rory Pilgrim
Stina Nyberg
Will Rawls
Young In Hong
Zadie Xa
Collaboration between Kim Coleman, Zoë Poluch and Cara Tolmie

In post-Brexit Britain, this year’s festival theme will explore ideas surrounding political bodies, both personal and public, addressing identity politics and notions of nationhood set against a changing socio-political landscape. Looking at networked communities and the power of collective voices, Block Universe will champion work that questions the status quo in divisive times.

With four UK premieres and five site-specific commissions in noteworthy settings across central London, the works include: choreography modelled on the Gwangju uprising taking place in the public square of the Royal Academy of Arts courtyard by Young In Hong; Stina Nyberg’s choreographic work questioning Swedish physical ideals from the 1920s through a visually described performance; Rory Pilgrim’s collaboration with a youth group exploring sci-fi robotic support systems of care set in a Quaker Hall; and Isil Egrikavuk’s performative dinner exploring parallels between Pluto’s demotion from our solar system with the UK’s exit from the EU, amongst others.

Listings on Facebook.

London Craft Week @ various venues in central London / until Sunday 7th May 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: various

@ Various venues in central London

www.londoncraftweek.com/programme

The third edition of London Craft Week takes up residence in the capital. This annual event showcases the very best international and British creativity and craftsmanship through a ‘beyond luxury’ journey-of-discovery.

The curated programme brings together over 230 events from all corners of the globe fusing making, design, fashion, art, luxury, food, culture and shopping.

From the V&A to The Shard and RADA to The House of Lords, hidden studios to Mayfair stores and bustling workshops to Michelin starred restaurants, London Craft Week is spread across the capital’s iconic buildings, influential institutions and off-the-beaten track side streets, many of which are not normally open to the public. Likewise, the programme spans a broad spectrum from unknown makers to celebrated masters, famous designers, brands and galleries. Emerging and established makers and artists such as Tom Raffield, Bill Amberg, Felicity Aylieff, Julian Stair and Grayson Perry feature alongside luxury brands including: Founding Partner Vacheron Constantin, Princess Yachts, Rolls Royce, Mulberry and Georg Jensen.

Museums and galleries include the V&A, Geffrye Museum, British Museum and Wallace Collection and fashion designers include Vivienne Westwood, Mary Katrantzou and Hussein Chalayan. International content includes wood carvers from Japan, artisans from Korea, wood block printers from China, designer-makers from Hong Kong, ceramists from Taiwan, umbrella and cufflink makers from France, porcelain painters from Germany, glass artists from Sweden, furniture makers from Denmark and a guitar maker from Spain.

The Gap in the Light @ New Diorama Theatre / until 27th May 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 19:30

@ New Diorama Theatre, 15-16 Triton Street, Regent’s Place, London NW1 3BF

Tickets: from £12.50 book online

www.newdiorama.com/whats-on/the-gap-in-the-light

As we grapple with a changing world – divisive politics, unstoppable temperature rises, never ending wars – Engineer Theatre Collective explore what it is to be truly afraid. Blending striking physical storytelling with visceral design, The Gap in the Light traces the nightmares that disturb the sleep of our modern world. How far do we have to fall, and who will catch us when the rope snaps?

The show tells the story of two climbers making a deep descent into somewhere they don’t belong. What they encounter in the dark feels real, but what they bring back with them, into the light, will change everything…

A sound. Stop. She’s suspended in black. What’s there? Head torch on full beam… Nothing. It’s in her head. Silent, she continues her descent.

The sound again. Closer. Head torch flickers off. She calls to her climbing partner. No answer. She hangs. Alone. Engulfed in the abyss.

Warning:
Parts of the performance will take place in complete darkness.

Canopy Market @ King’s Cross / Friday 28th until Sunday 30th April 2017 (and every last weekend of the month)

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Friday 28 April 12-8pm
Saturday 29 April 11am-6pm
Sunday 30 April 11am-6pm

@ West Handyside Canopy, Granary Square, Kings Cross, London N1C 4AA

Free entry

www.kingscross.co.uk/canopy-market

Returning to King’s Cross next week after the success of last year’s pop-up events, and this time it’s here to stay: bigger, better and tastier than before! The market, in collaboration with Real Food Festivals, is located under the restored Victorian West Handyside Canopy and runs for one weekend a month, starting today through this weekend.

You can shop one-off pieces from independent designers, buy artisan produce directly from traders, and sample finger-lickin’ street food, along with craft beer and coffee, all to the tune of live music and DJs.

Music lovers will be able to relax under the canopy, set to the sounds of singer/songwriter Victor Vox, DJ Claire Kalvis and jazz and blues star Dakota Jim.

Food traders include The Charcuterie Board with a selection of their finest cured meats; pioneers of flavour World of Zing; chocoholics heaven Bad Brownie; and hand-selected cheese from Borough Cheese Company. The Greek Larder, Casa Cannoli and Montadito will also each have a stand.

Visitors will shop unique vintage finds at The Hendersons and ethical and beautiful products at Buy Impossible, Lily Cole’s social retail venture; peruse the wares of designer-makers from business incubator Cockpit Arts, and enjoy the artworks from emerging illustrators, handpicked by House of Illustration.

Richard Tuttle: The Critical Edge @ Pace Gallery / until 13 May 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: Tues-Sat 10-6

@ Pace Gallery, 6 Burlington Gardens, London W1S 3ET

Free entry

www.pacegallery.com/exhibitions/12860/the-critical-edge

An exhibition of recent works in fabric by Richard Tuttle. First presented at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, in 2016, the exhibition follows two other major exhibitions of Tuttle’s work. In 2014, The Whitechapel Gallery surveyed the artist’s career from the 1960s to today and Tate Modern commissioned Tuttle’s largest textile sculpture to date for its iconic Turbine Hall.

Richard Tuttle (b. 1941, Rahway, New Jersey) is one of the most significant artists working today. Since the mid-1960s, he has created an extraordinarily varied body of work that eludes historical or stylistic categorization. Tuttle’s work exists in the space between painting, sculpture, poetry, assemblage, and drawing. He draws beauty out of humble materials, reflecting the fragility of the world in his poetic works. Without a specific reference point, his investigations of line, volume, color, texture, shape, and form are imbued with a sense of spirituality and informed by a deep intellectual curiosity. Language, spatial relationship, and scale are also central concerns for the artist, who maintains an acute awareness for the viewer’s aesthetic experience. Tuttle was the Artist in Residence at the Getty Research Institute from September 2012–June 2013. The artist lives and works in Mount Desert, Maine; Abiquiu, New Mexico and New York City.

Ashley Bickerton: Ornamental Hysteria @ Newport Street Gallery / until 20th August 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Tuesday – Sunday 10am – 6pm
Closed on Mondays

@ Newport Street Gallery, Newport Street, London SE11 6AJ

Free entry

www.newportstreetgallery.com/exhibitions/ashley-bickerton

Spanning more than three decades of Bickerton’s career and features 51 works, including a significant display of new and previously unexhibited pieces. It is the artist’s first UK show since 2009 and runs throughout all six spaces at Newport Street Gallery.

Bickerton moved to New York in 1982 and after working as a painting assistant to Jack Goldstein, he emerged as a key figure on the newly exploding East Village art scene. Within the context of the culture of commodification sweeping America he rose to prominence as part of an amorphous movement that was branded ‘Neo-Geometric Conceptualism’. Alongside artists such as Haim Steinbach and Jeff Koons, Bickerton endeavoured to reframe the practice of art production in response to the new, seductive mechanisms of desire at work in society.

Bickerton abandoned New York in 1993, eventually settling in Bali, where he still lives and works. Whilst a number of his themes prevailed, the materiality of his work shifted dramatically after this self-imposed exile from the urban environment.

Both in materiality and content, Bickerton’s work resists categorisation. On the diversity of his mediums – photocollage, appropriated image, digital image, paint and sculpture – he states: “Painting is far too cartoony and lacks the backbone of factuality; photography is too clinical and incapable of loony launches into the ether; and sculpture can be just downright presumptuous. […] Only in their combination do I find comfort.”

Bickerton’s conceptual commitment to intersectionality extends to his subject matter; his audacious and technically complex assemblages are predicated on themes of opposition and duality, for example representation and reality, creativity and commodity, nature and artifice, idyll and apocalypse. This is evident in his earlier work on display in gallery 1, which offers a sardonic critique of contemporary consumer culture and the commodification of the ‘art object’ via steel and aluminium wall-mounted ‘Culturescapes’ from the ‘Logo’ and ‘Non-Word Word’ series. Galleries 3 and 4 are dominated by Bickerton’s ‘Sea’ and ‘Landscapes’ – overblown and incongruous, they contain ephemera from the anthroposphere in the simulated shells of transportation devices. In part, these “truly contemporary” landscapes might be read as a dystopian view of the devastating impact of man on the ecosphere.

Throughout his career, Bickerton has challenged the relevancy of traditional art-historical tropes. His ‘self-portraits’ similarly parody the mythological figure of ‘the artist’, who is represented in the guise of the brands he chooses to endorse in Tormented Self-Portrait: Susie at Arles (25 Years) (2014) and as a five-bodied, technicoloured serpent in the monumental 5 Snake Heads (2009), on display in Newport Street’s double-height gallery 2.

Bickerton’s practice evolved in the late 90s to incorporate digital image and photography. In portraits such as Smiling Woman (2009), models (often family members and friends) are heavily made-up and photographed, then distorted in Photoshop before the image is printed on canvas and re-painted. These paintings are amongst Bickerton’s most overtly satirical, presenting lurid, constructed visions of life on a generic Pacific / Caribbean island.

Selfie to Self-Expression @ Saatchi Gallery / until 30th May 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10am-6pm, 7 days a week

@ Saatchi Gallery, Duke of York’s HQ, King’s Road, London SW3 4RY

Free entry

www.saatchigallery.com/selfie

Saatchi Gallery and Huawei have teamed up to present From Selfie to Self-Expression. This will be the world’s first exhibition exploring the history of the selfie from the old masters to the present day, and will celebrate the truly creative potential of a form of expression often derided for its inanity.

The show will also highlight the emerging role of the mobile phone as an artistic medium for self-expression by commissioning ten exciting young British photographers to create new works using Huawei’s newest breakthrough dual lens smartphones co-engineered with Leica.

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