Tag: Tate (page 1 of 2)

Fahrelnissa Zeid @ Tate Modern / until Sunday 8th October 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Sunday to Thursday 10.00–18.00
Friday to Saturday 10.00–22.00

@ Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: from £13.30 book online

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/fahrelnissa-zeid

Trained in both Paris and Istanbul, Fahrelnissa Zeid was an important figure in the Turkish avant-garde d Group in the early 1940s and the École de Paris (School of Paris) in the 1950s. Her vibrant abstract paintings are a synthesis of Islamic, Byzantine, Arab and Persian influences fused with European approaches to abstraction. Many of her abstract works are monumental and demand attention.

Zeid’s reputation as an artist was cemented in the 1950s when she was living between London and Paris and exhibiting extensively internationally. The artist also began experimenting with painting on turkey and chicken bones, which she later cast in polyester resin panels evocative of stained-glass windows. In the later years of her life she unexpectedly returned to figurative painting, creating stylised portraits of her friends and family.

Indulge in Zeid’s obsession with line and dazzling colour in this exhibition. Rediscover one of the greatest female artists of the 20th century in this first major retrospective.​

Fahrelnissa Zeid @ Tate Modern / until 15th October 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10am-6pm, Fri and Sat until 10pm

@ Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: £11.30 book online

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/fahrelnissa-zeid

Indulge in Zeid’s obsession with line and dazzling colour in this exhibition. Rediscover one of the greatest female artists of the 20th century in this first major retrospective.​ 🎨

Trained in both Paris and Istanbul, Fahrelnissa Zeid was an important figure in the Turkish avant-garde d Group in the early 1940s and the École de Paris (School of Paris) in the 1950s. Her vibrant abstract paintings are a synthesis of Islamic, Byzantine, Arab and Persian influences fused with European approaches to abstraction. Many of her abstract works are monumental and demand attention.

Zeid’s reputation as an artist was cemented in the 1950s when she was living between London and Paris and exhibiting extensively internationally. The artist also began experimenting with painting on turkey and chicken bones, which she later cast in polyester resin panels evocative of stained-glass windows. In the later years of her life she unexpectedly returned to figurative painting, creating stylised portraits of her friends and family.

Uniqlo Tate Lates August @ Tate Modern / Friday 25th August 2017

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 18:00–22:00

@ Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Free entry

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/late/uniqlo-tate-lates

This month Uniqlo Tate Lates celebrates ‘Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power’, a show dubbed one of the ‘must-see art shows of the year’ by NME. The exhibition shines a bright light on the vital contribution of Black artists to a dramatic period in American art and history, starting from 1963 at the height of the Civil Rights movement. ✊🏾

Lineup

Music & Visuals Programmed By NTS Radio
See Farai, Lala &ce and James Massiah live, with DJ sets from Bonaventure and Cktrl in the Turbine Hall. Plus see DJ sets from Nonsense, Minimal Effort and Senay in the Terrace Bar until 23.00.

Film Display
Drop in for a free display of four short films commissioned by Tate with support of the Ford Foundation for Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power. Films include ‘Black Mary’ By Kahlil Joseph, ‘Meeting Lorraine’ by Zawe Ashton, ‘The Ancestors Came’ by Cecile Emeke and ‘William T. Williams – A Diamond In A Box’ by Andy Mundy Castle.

Screening
Sampha: Process
Catch an exclusive screening of Process at 21.00 in the Starr Cinema. Process is a companion film to the debut album of singer-songwriter Sampha, directed by Kahlil Joseph, the visual storyteller behind Beyoncé’s Lemonade.

Sampha: Shy Light
Alongside the screening of Process, we launch Shy Light, a new zine by Sampha, created in collaboration with designer Grace Wales Bonner, art director Jamie Andrew Reid, and LA photographic duo Durimel.

Drawing Black Superheroes
Develop your own Black superheroes with character designer Wayne ‘Hard-Wired’ Riley. Take inspiration from historical figures, and learn how to design superhero characters using comic drawing techniques.

From a Creative Case to an Ecology of Care
What does the term ‘diversity’ mean? Join the debate led by The Ecology of Care team and generate a rolling document problematizing its definition. Interrogate policy and have your words amplified and made into badges.

Writing Black Power
Words were a powerful tool in the Black Power movement, from the poetry of Amiri Baraka to the speeches of Malcolm X. Explore the spoken word of the struggle at Bridget Minamore’s drop-in writing session, and hear pop-up readings throughout the evening.

Keeping It Real
Inspired by Black funk, soul and disco album sleeves, create your own album cover with artists Harold Offeh and Eloise Calandre, and watch your work projected live.

Uniqlo 10 Minute Art Talks
Staff and volunteers from across Tate share their personal insights into works from the collection.

Collection Conversation
Got an opinion about the art in Tate Modern? Visitor experience teams will lead three lively rounds of conversation around key artworks.

RSVP on Facebook.

Mona Hatoum @ Tate Modern / until 21st August 2016

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Sun–Thu 10am–6pm
Fri–Sat 10am–10pm

@ Tate Modern, Bankside London SE1 9TG

Tickets: £14.50 book online

www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/mona-hatoum

Mona Hatoum creates a challenging vision of our world, exposing its contradictions and complexities. Hot Spot is a steel cage-like neon globe which buzzes with an intense, mesmerising yet seemingly dangerous energy. Elsewhere electricity crackles through household objects, making the familiar uncanny.

This is the first major survey of Hatoum’s work in the UK, covering 35 years from her early radical performances and video pieces, to sculptures and large-scale installations. Born in Beirut to a Palestinian family, she settled in England in 1975.

Through the juxtaposition of opposites such as beauty and horror, Hatoum engages us in conflicting emotions of desire and revulsion, fear and fascination.

Immerse yourself in the work of one of the most important artists working today.
One of the most important and powerful artists of her generation finally gets the big British show she deserves.

Late @ Tate Britain / Friday 2nd October 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 18:00–22:00

@ Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1P 4RG

www.tate.org.uk

From historic royalty to YouTube fame, how has art displayed status? Starting with the idea of power, and going on to the body and changing face of celebrity, this season, Late at Tate Britain explores representations of status through time.

Start the week by tackling ideas of power through music, art and talks, with The Age of L.U.N.A, Skinny Girl Diet and Native Sun.

This season, Late at Tate Britain is curated by by 15-25 year olds from Tate Collective London. Tate Collective London host a range of free events and festivals for young people to experiment, create and innovate through art and ideas.

Music:
18.00–19.30 Reprezent Radio DJ set
19.30–20.15 Native Sun
20.15–20.45 Discussion with The Age of LUNA lead by Tate Collective London
20.45–21.30 The Age of L.U.N.A

Agnes Martin @ Tate Modern / until 11th October 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Sun–Thu, 10am–6pm
Fri–Sat, 10am–10pm

@ Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: £12 book online

www.tate.org.uk

Agnes Martin is perhaps most recognised for her evocative paintings marked out in subtle pencil lines and pale colour washes. Although restrained, her style was underpinned by her deep conviction in the emotive and expressive power of art. Martin believed that spiritual inspiration and not intellect created great work. ‘Without awareness of beauty, innocence and happiness’ Martin wrote ‘one cannot make works of art’.

The EY Exhibition: Sonia Delaunay @ Tate Modern / until 9th August 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
10.00–18.00, Sunday – Thursday
10.00–22.00, Friday – Saturday

@ Tate Modern, The Eyal Ofer Galleries, Level 3, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: £16 book online

www.tate.org.uk

Sonia Delaunay (1885–1979) was a key figure in the Parisian avant-garde and became the European doyenne of abstract art.

Throughout the first half of the twentieth century, she celebrated the modern world of movement, technology and urban life, exploring new ideas about colour theory together with her husband Robert Delaunay.

This will be the first UK retrospective to assess the breadth of her vibrant artistic practice across a wide range of media. It will feature the groundbreaking paintings, textiles and clothes she made across a sixty-year career, as well as the results of her innovative collaborations with poets, choreographers and manufacturers, from Diaghilev to Liberty.

Marlene Dumas: The Image as Burden @ Tate Modern / 10th May 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Sun – Thu 10am – 6pm
Fri – Sat 10am – 10pm

@ Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: £14.50 book online

www.tate.org.uk

Marlene Dumas is one of the most prominent painters working today. Her intense, psychologically charged works explore themes of sexuality, love, death and shame, often referencing art history, popular culture and current affairs – themes you can explore through related events.

‘Secondhand images’, she has said, ‘can generate first-hand emotions.’ Dumas never paints directly from life, yet life in all its complexity is right there on the canvas.

Her subjects are drawn from both public and personal references and include her daughter and herself, as well as recognisable faces such as Amy Winehouse, Naomi Campbell, Princess Diana, even Osama bin Laden. The results are often intimate and at times controversial, where politics become erotic and portraits become political. She plays with the imagination of her viewers, their preconceptions and fears.

Mira Schendel @ Tate Modern / until 19th January 2014

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
10:00–18:00 Sunday to Thursday
10:00–22:00 Friday to Saturday

@ Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: £11.75 book online

www.tate.org.uk

Mira Schendel was one of Latin America’s most important and prolific post-war artists. With her contemporaries Lygia Clark and Hélio Oiticica, Schendel reinvented the language of European Modernism in Brazil. Tate Modern is staging the first ever international full-scale survey of her work.

The exhibition reveals aspects of Schendel’s dialogues with a diverse range of philosophers and thinkers, as well as her engagement with universal ideas of faith, self-understanding and existence. It brings together over 250 paintings, drawings and sculptures from across her entire career, including works which have never been exhibited before.

Turner Collection @ Tate Britain / permanent collection

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: 10:00–18:00

@ Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1P 4RG

Free entry

www.tate.org.uk

Tate Britain houses the world’s largest collection of Turner’s work. It is home to the Turner Bequest, comprising 300 oil paintings and many thousands of sketches and watercolours (including 300 sketchbooks). The Bequest, including all works left behind in Turner’s studio at his death in 1851, forms the vast majority of the Turner collection at Tate.

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