The EY Exhibition: Sonia Delaunay @ Tate Modern / until 9th August 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
10.00–18.00, Sunday – Thursday
10.00–22.00, Friday – Saturday

@ Tate Modern, The Eyal Ofer Galleries, Level 3, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: £16 book online

www.tate.org.uk

Sonia Delaunay (1885–1979) was a key figure in the Parisian avant-garde and became the European doyenne of abstract art.

Throughout the first half of the twentieth century, she celebrated the modern world of movement, technology and urban life, exploring new ideas about colour theory together with her husband Robert Delaunay.

This will be the first UK retrospective to assess the breadth of her vibrant artistic practice across a wide range of media. It will feature the groundbreaking paintings, textiles and clothes she made across a sixty-year career, as well as the results of her innovative collaborations with poets, choreographers and manufacturers, from Diaghilev to Liberty.

Marlene Dumas: The Image as Burden @ Tate Modern / 10th May 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Sun – Thu 10am – 6pm
Fri – Sat 10am – 10pm

@ Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: £14.50 book online

www.tate.org.uk

Marlene Dumas is one of the most prominent painters working today. Her intense, psychologically charged works explore themes of sexuality, love, death and shame, often referencing art history, popular culture and current affairs – themes you can explore through related events.

‘Secondhand images’, she has said, ‘can generate first-hand emotions.’ Dumas never paints directly from life, yet life in all its complexity is right there on the canvas.

Her subjects are drawn from both public and personal references and include her daughter and herself, as well as recognisable faces such as Amy Winehouse, Naomi Campbell, Princess Diana, even Osama bin Laden. The results are often intimate and at times controversial, where politics become erotic and portraits become political. She plays with the imagination of her viewers, their preconceptions and fears.

Conflict, Time, Photography @ Tate Modern / until 15th March 2015

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
10.00–18.00 Sun–Thu
10.00–22.00 Fri–Sat

@ Tate Modern, The Eyal Ofer Galleries Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: around £13 book online

From the seconds after a bomb is detonated to a former scene of battle years after a war has ended, this moving exhibition focuses on the passing of time, tracing a diverse and poignant journey through over 150 years of conflict around the world, since the invention of photography.

In an innovative move, the works are ordered according to how long after the event they were created from moments, days and weeks to decades later. Photographs taken seven months after the fire bombing of Dresden are shown alongside those taken seven months after the end of the First Gulf War. Images made in Vietnam 25 years after the fall of Saigon are shown alongside those made in Nakasaki 25 years after the atomic bomb. The result is the chance to make never-before-made connections while viewing the legacy of war as artists and photographers have captured it in retrospect.

Mira Schendel @ Tate Modern / until 19th January 2014

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
10:00–18:00 Sunday to Thursday
10:00–22:00 Friday to Saturday

@ Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: £11.75 book online

www.tate.org.uk

Mira Schendel was one of Latin America’s most important and prolific post-war artists. With her contemporaries Lygia Clark and Hélio Oiticica, Schendel reinvented the language of European Modernism in Brazil. Tate Modern is staging the first ever international full-scale survey of her work.

The exhibition reveals aspects of Schendel’s dialogues with a diverse range of philosophers and thinkers, as well as her engagement with universal ideas of faith, self-understanding and existence. It brings together over 250 paintings, drawings and sculptures from across her entire career, including works which have never been exhibited before.

Merge Festival @ various Bankside venues / until Sunday 20th October 2013

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors: various

@ Various Bankside venues, London SE1

Tickets: mostly free, check website

www.mergefestival.co.uk

Merge 2013 is the third annual arts, music and performance festival celebrating the contemporary culture and rich heritage of Bankside, London’s dynamic artistic and business district. For one month, the river walkway near Tate Modern, the Victorian Kirkaldy Testing Museum, disused and historic buildings and other Bankside open spaces and workplaces will come alive when major names from the UK and international art world stage installations and musical performances alongside emerging artistic talent.

Venues:
– Flat Iron Square
– ’20 Blackfriars Road’
– Zenith House
– Kirkaldy Testing Museum
– Gold Caravan
– Southwark Playhouse
– Riverside Stage

 

Ellen Gallagher: AxME @ Tate Modern / until 1st September 2013

TIME AND PLACE:

Doors:
Sun to Thu 10:00-18:00
Fri to Sat 10:00-22:00

@ Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tickets: £10 book online

www.tate.org.uk

A mid-career retrospective for the American artist, a first chance for many to see her evocative treatments of myth, nature, art and social history.

This show surveys Gallagher’s eclectic practice over the past 20 years. Incorporating elements of abstraction and figuration, she works in a variety of media, including painting, drawing, relief, collage, print, sculpture, film and animation.

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Review: Lichtenstein: A Retrospective @ Tate Modern / until Monday 27th May 2013

To see “Look Mickey” in person, Roy Lichtenstein’s breakthrough painting, is like looking at a lost relic – the root of all things Pop: his early, definitive style and satire already visible in his controlled brushstrokes, comic-book aesthetic and signature hand-painted Benday dots. This is a precursor to the most comprehensive exhibition of Lichtenstein’s work, spanning 13 rooms of the Tate Modern, which include his famed War and Romance works such as Whaam! And Oh, Jeff… I Love You, Too… But…. In spite of their notoriety, these works formed only four years of the artist’s expansive career, and in a wonderful conclusion to this thorough retrospective are presented his large-scale and lesser-known nudes and Chinese landscapes. Conceived towards the end of his life, Lichtenstein’s palette has paled, the tone is serene. There is a lack of speech-bubbles and the scale used is paramount to gently tease the viewer with a hint of quiet honesty that his earlier works exchange for their hugely influential commentary on mass reproduction and the mechanical age.

This remarkable and captivating retrospective is a masterful nod towards Lichtenstein’s oeuvre that changed art forever, showcasing his work contextually through the chronology of his life as well as allowing the viewer to understand the times and influences of his work. Notably the Art about Art room highlights Lichtenstein’s adherance to his formal training, his composition of line, form and colour, seen in his homage to Picasso’s Femme d’Alger and the reproduction of the Vatican’s Laocoön: within this idiom is embedded infinite creative potential to stylise anything. This is emotionalism pre-packaged in accordance with the masked outlines of his work (Plus and Minus VI) and the finite edges of the canvas as comic strip panels (Masterpiece): this is the legacy of one of the central figures of American Pop Art.

 

TIME AND PLACE

Daily from 10am – 6pm,
Friday and Saturday until 10pm

Tate Modern
Bankside, SE1 9TG

Tickets £14, concessions from £6.10 to £12.20, all available here

 

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Lichtenstein: A Retrospective @ Tate Modern / Thursday 21st February – Monday 27th May 2013

TIME AND PLACE

Daily from 10am – 6pm,
Friday and Saturday until 10pm

Previews on Wednesday 20th February

Tate Modern
Bankside, SE1 9TG

Tickets £14, concessions from £6.10 to £12.20, all available here

Co-organised by The Art Institute of Chicago and Tate Modern, this will be the first major Lichtenstein retrospective for twenty years, bringing together 125 of the artist’s most definitive paintings and sculptures.

Roy Lichtenstein (1923-1997) is one of the central figures of American Pop Art. In the early 1960s he pioneered a new style of painting, executed by hand but inspired by industrial printing processes. He became renowned for works based on comic strips and advertising imagery, coloured with his signature hand-painted Benday dots, as an ongoing examination of representation and originality in mass media culture. It will also highlight Lichtenstein’s engagement with art history, revealing his lesser-known responses to Futurism, Surrealism and German Expressionism. In the final years of his life, the artist went on to create a series of huge female nudes and sublime Chinese landscapes, neither of which have previously been shown within the wider context of his oeuvre.

This exhibition will showcase such key paintings as Drowning Girl 1963 (Museum of Modern Art, New York), shown above.
Advance booking is highly recommended.

We serve fresh events daily. Say hello on twitter.com/informedlondon

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Advance Booking of Lichtenstein: A Retrospective @ Tate Modern / Thursday 21st February – Monday 27th May 2013

TIME AND PLACE

Daily from 10am – 6pm,
Friday and Saturday until 10pm

Tate Modern
Bankside, SE1 9TG

Tickets £14, concessions from £6.10 to £12.20, all available here

Co-organised by The Art Institute of Chicago and Tate Modern, this will be the first major Lichtenstein retrospective for twenty years, bringing together 125 of the artist’s most definitive paintings and sculptures. Built on new research and scholarship, the exhibition will reassess Lichtenstein’s work and his enduring legacy.

Roy Lichtenstein (1923-1997) is one of the central figures of American Pop Art. In the early 1960s he pioneered a new style of painting, executed by hand but inspired by industrial printing processes. He became renowned for works based on comic strips and advertising imagery, coloured with his signature hand-painted Benday dots, as an ongoing examination of representation and originality in mass media culture. It will also highlight Lichtenstein’s engagement with art history, revealing his lesser-known responses to Futurism, Surrealism and German Expressionism. In the final years of his life, the artist went on to create a series of huge female nudes and sublime Chinese landscapes, neither of which have previously been shown within the wider context of his oeuvre.

This exhibition will showcase such key paintings as Drowning Girl 1963 (Museum of Modern Art, New York), shown above.


Advance booking is highly recommended.

We serve fresh events daily. Say hello on twitter.com/informedlondon

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A Bigger Splash Exhibition @ Tate Modern / until Monday 1st April 2013

TIME AND PLACE

10am-6pm Sunday – Thursday
Last admission: 5.15pm

10am-10pm Friday – Saturday
Last admission: 9.15pm

@ Tate Modern
Bankside, SE1 9TG

Tickets £10, concessions available

This exhibition will take a new look at the dynamic relationship between performance and painting since 1950. Contrasting key paintings by Jackson Pollock and David Hockney, the exhibition considers two different approaches to the idea of the canvas as an arena in which to act: one gestural, the other one theatrical. The paintings of the Vienna Actionists or the Shooting Pictures of Niki de St Phalle will be re-presented within the performance context that they were made, and juxtaposed with works by artists such as Cindy Sherman or Jack Smith that used the face and body as a surface, often using make-up in work dealing with gender role-play. The exhibition proposes a new way of looking at the work of a number of younger artists whose approach to painting is energised by these diverse historical sources, drawing upon action painting, drag and the idea of the stage set.

On Monday 28th January / 6.45pm-7.45pm, self-defining Queer artist Tim “Timberlina,” will be constructing a performance tour of the exhibition, centred around exploring the exhibition for broader sensibilities and notions of Queer past and present. Tickets are £10 / £7 concessions, and include a free glass of wine.