Tag: things to do (page 1 of 83)

Launch of Social Bingo Academy on Saturday 27 January 2018

It’s obvious to anyone who’s played it that bingo is a phenomenal game. But, strangely, many young people still don’t see bingo as their number one pastime. The most likely reason for this is that young people in Britain today are ashamed that they lack the basic skills necessary to survive in the challenging world of modern bingo.

Traditional bingo halls can be intimidating places. Skill levels are high. Novice players who aren’t familiar with the complex rules often feel intimidated. The mission of the Social Bingo Academy is to equip a new generation of players with the skills to compete not just in traditional bingo environments but also all the “new-wave” bingo experiences popping up across the country. Bingo is changing. Don’t get left behind.

At the Social Bingo Academy you will be taught the rules, help you master advanced dabbing techniques, and show you how to win prizes in an enthusiastic but humble manner – all in a friendly, relaxed and social setting. If you enjoy drinking drinks, eating food, developing key life skills, and playing enjoyable games, then the Social Bingo Academy is the place for you!!!

Once mastered, there are few games that can match bingo for the deep sense of personal fulfilment and strong social bonds it brings. But developing the skills to participate in a meaningful way is the first hurdle.

The Social Bingo Academy will launch in a fully equipped, 750-seater bingo hall in Camden Town on 27th January 2018.

There is a full bar in the venue and food will be available in the form of lucious hotdogs from Popdogs.

www.bingo-academy.com

Location:
Social Bingo Academy, 180 Arlington Road, Camden Town, London NW1 7HL

Times:
7:30pm – 11pm

Price:
From £5 up to £15, book online

London Art Fair at Business Design Centre until 21 January 2018

Over the last thirty years, London Art Fair has given access to exceptional modern and contemporary art, as well as expert insight into the changing market. 👩‍🎨 👨‍🎨 🖼

Presenting leading British and international galleries alongside curated spaces Art Projects and Photo50, the Fair invites collectors and visitors to discover works by renowned artists from the 20th Century to today.

The Fair is an established destination for both museum quality Modern British and contemporary work from leading global names.

Sitting alongside the main Fair will be specially curated contemporary spaces Art Projects and Photo50, featuring the next generation of artists and collectives.

www.londonartfair.co.uk

Location:
Business Design Centre, 52 Upper Street, London N1 0QH

Times:
Thursday 11am – 9pm
Friday 11am – 7pm
Saturday 11am – 7.30pm
Sunday 11am – 5pm

Tickets:
Around £15 book online and get 30% discount compared to buying at the venue!

Gilbert & George: The Beard Pictures and Their Fuckosophy at White Cube until 28 January 2018

THE BEARD PICTURES are violent, eerie, grotesque, lurid and crazed. They show a dream-like world of paranoia and destruction and madness. Their strange sickly colours and creeping, smashed up, absurd landscapes confront the viewer with relentless aggression. THE BEARD PICTURES depict a world bereft of reason, in which negotiation no longer exists. 🔞 🔞 🔞

Gilbert & George take their place within THE BEARD PICTURES as intense, red, staring, empty-headed and sinister versions of themselves. Their eyes are shadowed and bizarrely prettified. Mutant, impish explorers or dead-headed sentinels, they seem to look at, into and through the viewer. They look possessed and serious. They look as though their spirits might have left their bodies. They look stern, absurd, imprisoned, mocking and mocked.

In each picture they wear beards that are surreal and symbolic. Beards made of wire mesh, beards made of beer foam, beards made of flowers, beards comprising rabbits with snakes for tongues. Secular and sacred, the throwback emblem of hip millennial youth as well as a mark of religious faith, the beard is depicted in THE BEARD PICTURES as both mask and meaning: a sign of the times.

In some of THE BEARD PICTURES, the artists stand either in front of a barbed wire or mesh fence, or behind one. Elsewhere, rusted steel rods sprout from collapsing buildings of pre-stressed concrete. In yet other pictures, Gilbert & George are unsmiling comic grotesques, with tiny bodies and huge heads. Behind them a blank silvery void, extravagant ornamental foliage, wire mesh fencing, newspaper advertisements for bouncers, builders and sex workers, the heads in relief of popes, monarchs, worthies and heroes.

Aggressively absurd, trashing contemporary artistic niceties but resonant with intense symbolism, THE BEARD PICTURES turn history into a mad parade, their mood shape-shifting between that of science fiction, lucid dreaming and Victorian caricature. It is a vision and a form which brings to mind Oscar Wilde’s account of Walter Pater’s ‘Appreciations’ (1889): ‘others are medieval in their strangeness of colour and passionate suggestion, and all of them absolutely modern, in the true meaning of the term modernity. For he to whom the present is the only thing that is present, knows nothing of the age in which he lives.’

In the half century that they have lived and worked together as Living Sculptures, embarked on a visionary journey through the modern world, always together and always alone, Gilbert & George have made fiercely singular Anti-Art that is poetic, primal and emotionally driven. Order and madness are held in tension, vaudevillian and nursery rhyme absurdity take on the air of paranormal ritual.

The more the viewer contemplates THE BEARD PICTURES, the more Gilbert & George appear like poltergeists within the cause of art and spirit sentinels within a world gone mad. In this chaos of trashed aesthetics and reversed values, all has become symbol and surface: mad symbols, presented with deadly seriousness. And as such they study the viewer.

In keeping with their career-long merger of cultural and artistic provocation, the FUCKOSOPHY of Gilbert & George exhaustively employs the common yet taboo swear word to create a vast directory of absurd, unusual, amusing, bland or memorable statements. As with their GODOLOGY the artists interrogate the nature of a culturally primal word through myriad repetitions, each in a different context.

www.whitecube.com/exhibitions/gilbert_and_george_bermondsey

Location:
White Cube Bermondsey
144 – 152 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ

Times:
Tuesday – Saturday 10am – 6pm
Sunday 12pm – 6pm

Price:
Free entry

Ferrari: Under the Skin at Design Museum until 15 April 2018

Race through 70 years of passion, glamour and design innovation, with unique behind-the-scenes access to one of the most iconic car brands. 🚘 🏁

In an Italy ravaged by the Second World War, Enzo Ferrari and a small team decided to create the perfect racing machine. The exhibition will explore Ferrari’s powerful personality, the design and manufacturing process, the famous clientele and the future of the luxury car brand.

From the very first Ferrari to Michael Schumacher’s winning Formula One car and the newest hybrid model, the exhibition features rare cars and memorabilia displayed in public for the first time. Discover the Ferrari experience through original hand-drawn sketches, sculpture-like models and engines, alongside films and interviews telling one of the great design stories of all time.

www.designmuseum.org/exhibitions/ferrari-under-the-skin

Location:
Design Museum, 224-238 Kensington High Street, London W8 6AG

Times:
10am – 6pm

Tickets:
From £8.15 book online

Permanent exhibition at Royal Air Force Museum

A unique experience to learn the story of the people who moulded the world of aviation from the daredevil early aviators to wartime heroes and the thousands of ordinary Service men and women who have served in the RAF and whose contribution has shaped the world that we live in today. ✈️ 🛩

With a world-class collection and display of aircraft, integrated with special exhibitions, films, interactives, artwork, engines, missiles, photographs, medals and uniforms and research and education facilities, the Museum takes an innovative approach to telling these stories whilst keeping with tradition.

With over 85 aircraft on site, nowhere else in London enables you to get close to so many historic and groundbreaking aircraft without paying an entrance.

In addition to this the Museum offers a full calendar of free events and exhibitions that not only bring the world beating collection to life but also educate whilst entertaining visitors.

www.rafmuseum.org.uk/london

Location:
RAF Museum London, Grahame, Park Way, London NW9 5LL

Times:
10am – 5pm

Price:
Free entry

The Currency of Communism at British Museum until 18 March 2018

This display looks at the changing roles of currency and exchange in communist states in the century since the 1917 Russian Revolution. 🤑 🤑 🤑

Communism proposes that money has no role in a utopian society. To date though, no communist state has successfully removed money from its economy. In the last 100 years, communism has existed in various forms in dozens of states all around in the world. From eastern Europe to Southeast Asia, this display examines the role of money in communist states, as well as the iconography and imagery associated with it.

Within communist economies, concepts of value and wealth are eroded and distorted, and the national currency becomes just one of various means of exchange. The display features examples of how the value of money has been reduced by communist states. East German coins made from aluminium demonstrate how communist currency was deliberately made to feel light and cheap. Adverts for savings banks from the USSR show how consumer benefits were left out of advertising in favour of information explaining how savings benefit the state.

With the reduced role of currency, communist states introduced different reward systems, starting in Russia in the 1930s. Stalin said people were to be measured ‘by their heroic feats’. A worker who exceeded their factory quota may receive the Order of the Badge of Honour, and a mother who raised nine children would receive the Order of Maternal Glory, First Class. These awards came with monetary bonuses, and allowed recipients access to a better quality of life due to the perks that came with them.

The collapse of the Soviet Union and the transition to democracy in the early 1990s had a huge effect on former communist states. With borders and economies suddenly open after many years, new ideas and imagery soon began to circulate, along with new national currencies. Today there are only four states with planned economies – China, Laos, Cuba and Vietnam. Trading relations between them and capitalist countries have become normalised, but concepts of currency and political ideology continue to evolve.

www.britishmuseum.org/whats_on/exhibitions/the_currency_of_communism

Location:
British Museum, Great Russell Street, London WC1B 3DG

Times:
10am – 5:30pm (Friday until 8:30pm)

Price:
Free entry

Artist Rooms: Bruce Nauman at Tate Modern until 24 July 2018

Bruce Nauman’s interest is ‘in what art can be, not just what painting can be,’ and he embraced a variety of media, including sculpture, installation, video, neon and printmaking. 🔺 🔸 🔹 🔳 🔲

In the mid-1960s, having first studied mathematics and physics, and then art, Bruce Nauman became involved with the art scene in Los Angeles and San Francisco. Throughout his career, Nauman has investigated who we are, physically and mentally, using the human body and the space it inhabits. His own body became an important tool and reference point, whether performing in videos, or being cast to form part of a sculpture. Using self-imposed limitations and systems, he exposes the body’s vulnerability, as well as the human potential for violence and our need to communicate.

Words are both the subject and the form of many of Nauman’s works. Through thought-provoking wordplay, his neon pieces and works on paper cast new light on everyday phrases. Sound and the human voice are also significant aspects of his artistic approach, be it using his own voice or employing actors to perform unsettling and humorous scenarios. Disrupting the traditionally quiet space of the gallery, Nauman wants the experience of his work to be: ‘like getting hit in the face with a baseball bat. Or better, like getting hit in the back of the neck. You never see it coming; it just knocks you down.’

www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-modern/display/bruce-nauman

Location:
Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Times:
10am – 6pm Friday and Saturday until 10pm

Price:
Free entry

Designs on Britain at Jewish Museum until 15 April 2018

Discover how much of the most iconic British design was produced by immigrants to this country. ✏️

20th century design in the UK was profoundly shaped by the arrival of pioneering Jewish émigré designers from continental Europe. They brought with them a knowledge of modernism and radically transformed the practice and language of British design.

Don’t miss iconic posters for London Underground, the General Post Office and the War Office created by designers including Dorrit Dekk, FHK Henrion and Hans Schleger.

See the classic designs that have been embraced by generations – a ‘70s Raleigh Chopper bike, an early Marble Run toy, and the London Transport bus stop sign.

www.jewishmuseum.org.uk/designs

Location:
Jewish Museum London, Raymond Burton House, 129-131 Albert Street, London NW1 7NB

Times:
10am – 5pm (Friday 10am – 2pm)

Price:
£8.50 more info

Lumiere across central London from 18 to 21 January 2018

Bigger, brighter and bolder, the Lumiere London light festival returns for a spectacular second edition. 🔻 🔹 🔻 🔹

More than 40 UK and international artists reimagine London’s iconic architecture and streets, transforming the city into a dazzling nocturnal art exhibition.

Free to visit and taking place north and south of the river Thames, the UK’s largest light festival extends its reach across the capital. Everyone is invited!

RSVP on Facebook

www.visitlondon.com/lumiere
www.artichoke.uk.com

Location:
King’s Cross, Fitzrovia, West End, Mayfair, Westminster, Victoria, South Bank and Waterloo

Times:
Nightly

Price:
Free for everyone!

Scribbler Valentine’s PlayDate at SAMA Bankside on 10 February 2018

Single women and men, try something different this Valentine’s Day with PlayDate in association with Scribbler. 💏💋🍷🍺

Everyone gets a special Scribbler goody bag, free drink, nibbles, games and entry to the afterparty!

You don’t have to be an artist or especially creative, just take a good sense of humour and willingness to mingle with other single people and the hosts will take care of the rest! The emphasis is on fun, play and interaction.

Retro sweets will be freely available throughout the event from 7pm and of course you will be encouraged to share a loveheart with the person you fancy.

Your entry ticket will also grant you entry to the venue for the rest of the evening until close and you are welcome to stay on and mingle!

There are a limited number of ‘male’, ‘female’ and ‘mixed’ tickets. Mixed tickets are the equivalent of a single male and a single female ticket combined. If certain tickets are sold out please join the waiting list or purchase a mixed ticket and take a single friend.

www.scribbler.com
www.playdatelondon.com
www.samabankside.co.uk

Location:
SAMA Bankside, 3 Robinson Road, London SE1 8BU

Times
7pm until late

Price:
£25 book online

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